Want a lifetime of happy quilting? Know these basics (+ giveaway!)

All quilters know it’s true: it only takes a few threads to knock a quilt block off its game.

Muddled cutting and sewing can quickly have a domino effect. One block is too small, another is too large, and all of a sudden no block wants to play nice! But here’s the good news:

When you learn to cut and piece with precision, you’ll clear the way for a lifetime of quilting creativity—instead of frustration.

Quiltmaking Essentials IBestselling author Donna Lynn Thomas has taught quiltmaking since 1981. She’s seen (and fixed) it all. Now she’s gathered her know-how into a must-have book: Quiltmaking Essentials 1. In it, you’ll discover time-tested techniques for rotary cutting, pressing, and machine piecing—the trio of techniques that lead to well-behaved quilt blocks!

If you want patchwork blocks that promise to play nice every time, it’s well worth the effort to learn (or re-learn) the essentials. Today we’re thrilled that Donna is here as a guest blogger to tell us more about her latest book. Welcome, Donna!


Donna Lynn ThomasI’m SO excited about Quiltmaking Essentials 1 and hope you will be too. Bet you noticed that little old “1” sitting at the end of the title, eh? As an astute reader I bet you noticed that subtitle too. Well, volume 1 is all about cutting, piecing, pressing, and block construction. And Quiltmaking Essentials 2 is on its way. It’ll be in your hands in early 2015 and takes you to the last stitch on your bindings.

Yes, I admit—I’m all about precision! Precision is getting a bad rap these days, dismissed as an obsessive thing. To correct this undeserved image, I explain to my students that precision isn’t about pleasing the quilt police. It’s about developing good skills and habits to make the piecing process more enjoyable.

After all, Van Gogh first had to learn how to prepare his canvas, use and care for his brushes properly, mix paints, use the right paints for the desired effect, and much more in order to create his masterpieces. Once his essential skills were mastered and became second nature, he could focus completely on the creative process.

Tip box from Quiltmaking Essentials IBy the same token, a quilter will enjoy creating her own masterpieces if she isn’t frustrated by pieces and blocks that don’t fit together properly. Her skills should be second nature as well so she can enjoy hours of frustration-free and happy sewing. This is where Quiltmaking Essentials 1 comes in.

Loaded with tip boxes (see right), the book will travel with you as you learn and grow as a quilter, teaching the basics but also delving into essentials beyond the basics such as cutting and sewing diamonds, set-in seams (they are NOT as scary as people think they are), and much more. And lefties are not forgotten either.

Quilt how-to for left-handed people
From
Quiltmaking Essentials I: illustrations for righties AND lefties!

But of all the things we need to master, there’s one skill that’s often neglected or underplayed: pressing.

Quilting with a pressing planPressing you ask? What’s there to know about pressing? An iron, a surface, some electricity, and away you go, right? Well, there’s more to know about pressing than you might think! How wonderful is it when all the seams meeting at an intersection end up pressed in opposite directions? Wouldn’t it be wonderful if strip sets didn’t curve and those half-square-triangle units stayed square? Ever wonder if you should press seams open as opposed to one side?

In Quiltmaking Essentials 1, mysteries of the quilt-pressing universe are revealed! You’ll learn how to make a pressing plan for all your seams before setting out on that trip. You’ll learn things you didn’t know you needed to know.

Beyond pressing, you’ll find so much information on all aspects of piecing packed into this 48 page book—oops, that’s wrong—it increased to 64 pages to fit everything in! You’ll want to keep it handy every time you set out to make a new quilt and try new skills.

My hope is that your copy of Quiltmaking Essentials 1 will become so tattered and worn over the years that you’ll have to buy multiple copies, thus ensuring my ability to retire some day… Well actually, I truly do want you to enjoy many years of happy sewing!


Donna, thanks for getting us fired up about adding smart techniques to our quilting tool belt!

A pressing plan: always, sometimes…or never heard of it? Share your answer in the comments and you could win a copy of the Quiltmaking Essentials 1 eBook! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.

Comments are closed for this post.

Thanks to all who entered the drawing! The winner is Riley, who says:

“I love patterns which tell you how to press. If they don’t, I fumble around pressing and unpressing. I would love to learn how to develop a pressing plan.”

Riley, we’ll email you about your prize. Congratulations!


441 Comments

  • I always press but it does seem like a chore when I want to get blocks done

    Betsy on June 5, 2014
  • I;m not sure of what you mean by a pressing plan, but I learned many years ago, pressing your pieces as you go along determines the happy outcome of your finsihed piece. Never short change your project by not pressing.

    —Dawn on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing PLAN? Never heard if it.

    —April on June 5, 2014
  • I have quilted for 12 years and I find that pressing is extremely important; every step of the way. There are always new tips to be learned; your book sounds like it would be of help to new quilters and those who have quilted for years.

    —Nancy on June 5, 2014
  • I have to confess, I am a presser! Though sometimes I feel I could make better use of the time, I do press as I find my projects turn out more precise. As I look at my project it progress, seeing it presses is a motivator to continue to be conscientious as I continued working on it.

    —Gail on June 5, 2014
  • I’m not sure what a pressing plan is but I could probably benefit from knowing. I grew ironing everything and I have a tendency to iron, not press.

    —Joanne O'Neal on June 5, 2014
  • This book looks wonderful! I’m mostly a self taught quilter, using lots of the free tutorials you offer, but I think this book would be a wonderful guide for me. Would love to win it, so please, please, please pick me!

    —Carol on June 5, 2014
  • I have been quilting for a couple of years now and really need help with pressing. Never really knew it made a difference and was ironing. WOW was I wrong. I need to develop new skills of pressing and not ironing and I love it when the seams marry but it happens by accident I have to admit. This book sounds like it would take a lot of guess work out of quilting and make my job so much easier. Thanks

    —Marie Sheppard on June 5, 2014
  • Yes — I realize the importance of pressing and I understand how important it is for the seams to nest correctly. However once there are more seams meeting at one point — should you press the seams open, rather to the side? How important is the iron you are using? Am I stretching fabric if I iron too much? So many questions on such a basic and important quilting step.

    Does the book address these types of questions?

    thanks.
    Joan

    —joan desantis on June 5, 2014
  • I know that one is supposed to press the seems in opposite directions where they will intersect but I have a hard time knowing when and where to do this. Maybe your book could help me! I’d love a copy of your book.
    Thanks

    —Jean on June 5, 2014
  • Since I’m a new quilter, pressing has always been a question. Thanks for writing this book.

    —Ann on June 5, 2014
  • Never heard of a pressing plan..but it makes sense.. now if only I *remembered* it every time…. 🙂

    —Carol on June 5, 2014
  • Though I’ve never heard of a pressing plan, per se, beyond "go to the dark side." ButI know how important it is and I know the patternmakers I’ve used sure have. At a workshop, my teacher was very specific at which way to press the seams. And when you have a bunch of seams coming together it makes a big difference. I’d like to know more. Thanks!

    —Diana on June 5, 2014
  • Yes, I put thought into which direction I’m going to press before I actually do it. I would love to win the book!

    —Shari Kersey on June 5, 2014
  • So many quilters have plunged in…that’s great! This book may help keep them going when they hit a "skills needed" roadblock!

    —Sunnie Malesky on June 5, 2014
  • I always follow the pressing guidelines in quilting instructions. That way, the seams always nest together perfectly! LESS FRUSTRATION!!

    —Erin Earl on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing plan – yes I always try but it doesn’t always work. Some patterns give you hints but there are many out there that don’t suggest which way to press. Can’t wait to read this book – sounds like a wonderful addition to my library of well-used ideas & suggestions to make my quilts better.

    —Joy B on June 5, 2014
  • I always figure out the best way to press so that my seams will lie flat. Sometimes, it is difficult to figure out and I would love to know the best way to do this.

    —Debbie Fowler on June 5, 2014
  • I definitely stand back and look at the project before pressing and get a plan in my head.. If I have a lot of white or light colors I will press to the dark or decide to press open depending on the pattern. Personally I prefer to the side for nesting seams, but thats not always the smartest choice!

    Debbie D. on June 5, 2014
  • I appreciate it when a pattern has a pressing plan – when I am winging it I sometimes end up having to rethink the pressing – or re-pressing some blocks to make things work.

    —regina on June 5, 2014
  • A pressing plan? It’s something I always do – sometimes by trial and error. I just didn’t know it had a name. Now, about those curvy strip sets….

    —Martha on June 5, 2014
  • Do you mean that I have to relearn everything about quilting. Pressing has always been press to the dark material. I am very precise but with Murphy’s law in place, I can come up short.

    Barbara on June 5, 2014
  • I have never heard of a pressing plan I just always went with the press to the darker of the two fabrics.

    —Mindy Wolfe on June 5, 2014
  • I am a beginning quilter and still getting everything set-up. So, I have never heard of a pressing plan but do have a question about ironing/pressing. Do you iron or press your yardage to remove creases/wrinkles?

    —Scorpie on June 5, 2014
  • A great big hoorah for pressing. I have seen seams done by those who insist that finger pressing is enough. Bah! And a plan? Actually, I always press toward the dark. From time to time, however, I have run into a problem with that plan and had to repress. The problem was me, and how I put the block together. I see from the drawing above that the plan works every time. From now on, I PLAN to think ahead so my seams will nest.

    —vickie on June 5, 2014
  • I appreciate patterns that have directions for pressing. Otherwise I tend to press toward the dark unless I need to do otherwise to get the seams to abut each other.

    —Marca Fritzemeier on June 5, 2014
  • I usually pressed toward the darkest side.

    —Sandra on June 5, 2014
  • Why do my comments have a bunch of text after the word, Warning? Anyone?

    Hi Vickie,
    Not sure why that is happening but your previous comment looked just fine on our end. Our IT guy and webmaster will look into it!
    Cheers,
    Cornelia/Customer Service

    —vickie on June 5, 2014
  • A Pressing Plan….never heard of it! And that could be why I often end up with wonky blocks even after pressing (not ironing)!!

    —Linda B on June 5, 2014
  • I would buy a book just about pressing! So many times the back of my blocks are just a mess.

    —Nancy Z on June 5, 2014
  • I just noticed the pressing plans in follow along quilting. Need to watch the patterns for a pressing plan. crystalbluern at onlineok dot com

    —Debra Kay Neiman on June 5, 2014
  • My pressing does leave a lot to be desired! I have often envied other people’s quilts that have such neat back with all the seams going where they are supposed to go. Something I really need to work on!

    —Brenda Hulsey on June 5, 2014
  • I used to only press to the side but read and learned that sometimes it is better to open the seams. I do find pressing really helps the look of the project. I have been lucky to have had Donna as a teacher, so know will learn a lot from her books.

    —Cindy Wienstroer on June 5, 2014
  • I usually try to have a plan, but sometimes the best pressing plans go awry and I’m stuck with 2 seams pressed in the same direction. I solve the dilemma by pressing seams open, but often sections have been sewn and it’s too late. If there could be a good strategy for solving this, I’d love to read about it in Donna’s book!

    —Marie Chat on June 5, 2014
  • This book Quilting Essentials 1 appears to be a good book to pass onto my grand daughter 12 year old, as she is learning to sew. The tips will help me improve my quilting skills.
    Carol

    —Carol Dunn on June 5, 2014
  • Yes, of course…many patterns indicate in the instructions which direction to press the seams. However, that really only works if you use fabrics exactly as directed & will assemble exactly as directed. Since I tend not to, and don’t decide on final block arrangement until all blocks are completed, I find it works better to NOT PRESS any seams that I don’t have to until after I have decided how to arrange them! That way, I don’t have to go back & "re-press" any seams that turned out to be the wrong way! This gives me a lot more flexibility in "swirling" the blocks around in order to get the final look that I like the most. Obviously, you would never publish this, as it will not sell the book…just a thought that creative quilters ( who see a pattern as more of an idea, then do whatever they want with it ) might find helpful!

    —Ellen Horning on June 5, 2014
  • Sometimes I have a pressing plan- I love when it’s included in block construction instructions.

    —Claire on June 5, 2014
  • I love pressing plans. Having the seams nest really helps me line up my blocks and keeps my quilt from going all wonky.

    —LynS on June 5, 2014
  • A Pressing Plan….never heard of it!! And that could be why I sometimes end up with crooked blocks even after pressing! I could certainly learn much from Donna Lynn Thomas and Quiltmaking Essentials 1!

    —Linda B on June 5, 2014
  • ALWAYS press! I’m a fairly new quilter, so I’d rather error on the side of caution. Thanks for the opportunity to win!

    —Brenda C on June 5, 2014
  • ALWAYS press! I’m a fairly new quilter, so I’d rather error on the side of caution. Thanks for the opportunity to win!

    —Brenda C on June 5, 2014
  • Sometimes. Actually, I always try, but many times I have to re-press because the seams are not facing the right way. 🙁

    —Judy on June 5, 2014
  • I am fussy about how I press my quilt blocks. I find it makes piecing easier and the final project lays nice and flat if your seams are pressed in the correct sequence. It’s not as important to me to press toward the darker fabric as it is to press so that all of my seams can nest.

    —KatieQ on June 5, 2014
  • a pressing plan is a great idea and although I have never written down my plan I usually try to go in with one….LOL…. that being said it doesn’t always work out the way I planned … so maybe I should try writing it down! This book looks like a must have for beginners and a great review for the rest of us.. great job!!!!!

    —Tonie Peterson on June 5, 2014
  • Sometimes, I try to press so seams form a small 4 patch on the back and spin opposite every other row.

    —Quilting Tangent on June 5, 2014
  • Being that I’m new to quilting, I was just told to press seams in opposite directions so they will blend. I am getting ready to do my first triangle square quilt and would like to know if pressing open the seam is better than to one side when putting triangle squares together. I am nervous about making this quilt as it is for one of my brothers. I am making quilts for both my brothers and want them to look perfect (even if they aren’t).

    —Carol Bramande on June 5, 2014
  • I always have a pressing plan..It distresses me when I see a quilt shared on FB and it is evident there was no pressing, much less a plan.

    —Jill Myra Martin on June 5, 2014
  • Many patterns give directions on pressing, but I never thought of it as a "pressing plan" when I am working with just putting together scrap blocks without a pattern. Makes sense and I will revise my thinking so that I can plan for success in matching seams!

    —Carole Diehl on June 5, 2014
  • I always press with a dry iron, after each seam! I keep a travel iron near my sewing machine, so I don’t even need to get up!

    —Joan on June 5, 2014
  • Correct pressing and cutting will save hours pc frustration.

    —Dorothy Ransom on June 5, 2014
  • Congratulations Donna. Even though I haven’t been out in the teaching world as long as you have (but I’m probably older than you!!), I totally agree with the concept of your new book. I can’t wait to get a copy.

    You are exactly right when you say that if you make precision piecing your "standard practice" it will become second nature.

    When we are paying $10, $11, $12 a yard for fabric, I think we owe the quilt we are making the best work we can do. I’ve been influenced by you, Jo Morton and others and like you said, precision piecing only makes the project easier in the end. So many focus on how fast we can make a project — I like fast, but fast isn’t always fast when you have to rip out and resew because the pieces don’t fit.

    Thanks for nudging quilters in the right direction.

    —Candy Hargrove on June 5, 2014
  • Never thought of it as a plan, but it makes sense. I would love to see your other hints in the book!

    —Carole Diehl on June 5, 2014
  • Having a plan is a novel idea! No wonder I am always fuming when I go to join blocks and scratching my head. Thanks for the chance to win this interesting book! Being a newbie, I feel sure this will be a tremendous help!!

    —Patsy Wilkerson on June 5, 2014
  • I always always press. That’s press not iron !! There is a difference!
    Ironing may stretch your fabric, while pressing correctly will not.

    —Re on June 5, 2014
  • I would love to have a pressing plan. Especially how to "fan" four seams. Are we always supposed to fan? what about when we have points? I want to fan. I long to fan. Sometimes fanning just doesn’t work. And I inderstand pressing to the dark, but sometimes when I am working on a block I have to unpress, repress and double check to make sure my seams nest.

    —Mary on June 5, 2014
  • I try to have a plan and somehow it always turns out that I have to re-press or fold and already sewed seam the other way for the other end. I sure would love to learn how to do this properly. The best laid plans, like mine, don’t turn out LOL

    —Lori on June 5, 2014
  • I would love to have a pressing plan. Especially how to “fan” four seams. Are we always supposed to fan? what about when we have points? I want to fan. I long to fan 🙂 Sometimes fanning just doesn’t work. And I understand pressing to the dark, but sometimes when I am working on a block I have to unpress, repress and double check to make sure my seams nest.

    —Mary on June 5, 2014
  • I keep a post-it note on or near my machine reminding me that even numbered rows go one way and odd the other. It sure does help not having to re-press all those seams!! So, yes, I guess I do have a pressing plan.

    —krafty kc on June 5, 2014
  • Sometimes I have one, especially if the directions spell it out for me, but, more often than not, I am at a loss and would love to receive your new book, which sounds like it would be very helpful and informative. Thanks for this opportunity.

    —Sylvia Anderson on June 5, 2014
  • Never heard of it! I was taught to press seams to one side, preferably the darker side from front and back of piece.

    —Jan on June 5, 2014
  • ALWAYS know the grain of your pieces and set up your pressing plan accordingly. This makes a huge difference in the finished project plus ensures ease of construction!

    —Sue Bullock McKenzie on June 5, 2014
  • Never really have a pressing plan…but I do a lot of repressing to get the seams to nest when sewing blocks together. What a great learning tool for a new and old sewers! Would love have this as a resource to use myself and pass on to my daughter.

    —Cheryl M on June 5, 2014
  • It never occurred to me to draw a diagram to indicate the best direction to press each seam ‘before’ starting to sew. Great idea!

    Gail on June 5, 2014
  • ALWAYS know the grain of your pieces and set up your pressing plan accordingly. This makes a huge difference in the finished project plus ensures ease of construction!

    —Sue Bullock McKenzie on June 5, 2014
  • i’ve been accused of being too precise but I never let it bother me because the I always pressed quilts as I constructed them as well as clothing I have made. My friends and relatives who sew with little pressing in the construction process cannot understand why their quilts and garments never turn out as nice as mine. I believe that if you decide to do something, you might as well do your best to do it well. You’ll feel good about what you did in the end.

    —Carol A. on June 5, 2014
  • Congratulations Donna!! Thank you for promoting accuracy in quilting. I haven’t been out in the teaching world as long as you have (but I’m probably older than you!), but this is exactly what I like to focus on in my classes. Not so much about making/finishing a project, but learning the techniques to make everything go together smoothly.

    We are paying $10, $11, $12+ per yard for fabric. I think we owe it to the quilts we make to use the best techniques to produce a quilt we are proud of. So many focus on fast – getting a quilt done as fast as you can. Fast doesn’t always end up being fast when it results in ripping out and resewing.

    My focus on accuracy has been influence by you, Jo Morton and others. I can guarantee that focusing on accuracy in quilt making does become second nature, and don’t our quilts deserve the best work we can do??? I think they do.

    Thanks again Donna – I can’t wait to get a copy of the new book.

    —Candy Hargrove on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing = exercise for me. My cutting board is in the garage, my sewing machine is in the den, and my ironing board is in the back bedroom. All blocks need to be pressed, but the timing may be different. During multiple block construction, I may finger press seams, but I always press seams before continuing to the next step, which helps keep my blocks square. I still get mileage going from place to place during construction, which helps keep my weight steady!!

    —Marilyn on June 5, 2014
  • I am a beginner. I just jump in there and flounder around and hope it works out. There are so many ‘experts’ saying do this, do that, that I’m more confused than ever. It would be great to have a plan – any plan – from a reliable source that could take the frustration out of quilting for me. I am starting to avoid my sewing room because I come away without getting the results I want. Donna makes sense and I’d love to have her book so I can start wearing and tattering it myself!

    —Denyse Rose on June 5, 2014
  • A pressing plan would be good to have for guild block swaps!!!

    —Linda P in IL on June 5, 2014
  • One of the "best tricks" of pressing is that sometimes when seams do not meet, not matter what you do, if you reverse the direction of the seam and press, it will (magically) meet correctly. Nearly one-third of your quilting (or sewing) experience is spent at the ironing board!

    —Terry G on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is a very important component to create a well made project. When l started quilting l took every shortcut and attempted to press at the end. My projects never ended up as well made as others. Now l have an iron by my machine to ensure l press the seams flat and in the correct direction. Planning is also required when you are matching rows. If you have everything going the same way., you end of so much bulk and it makes it difficult to sew through, I spend the time now to ensure l press flat so my seams line up so much better 1/8th of inch can distort the project if the seams aren’t pressed flat. I am more content with my finished projects and no more bulky seams…yes press as you work on your project – a better end result.
    I think this type of book is such a fantastic idea – many tips for right or left handed as well

    —Anne on June 5, 2014
  • When I first began quilting I didn’t realize there were different ways of pressing–I just pressed all my seams open. But then as I began following patterns I noticed the recommendations for pressing to one side or the other. I saw that it made so much sense when it came to joining pieces, so now I try to plan out the best directions for pressing as soon as I start my piecing.

    —Cindy Emond on June 5, 2014
  • I am a beginner. I just jump in there and flounder around and hope it works out. There are so many ‘experts’ saying do this, do that, that I’m more confused than ever. It would be great to have a plan – any plan – from a reliable source that could take the frustration out of quilting for me. I am starting to avoid my sewing room because I come away without getting the results I want. Donna makes sense and I’d love to have her book so I can start wearing and tattering it myself!

    —Denyse Rose on June 5, 2014
  • When I took Home Ec. in in Junior High one of the first things we learned was to press our seams open when we finished sewing them and I’ve continued to do that. When I took my first quilting class, I was surprised to learn that the rule was the same. I’ve just started quilting, but I understand there can be different ways to press for different types of quilting. I don’t know if this is what you meant by a pressing plan or not, but that’s my pressing plan. Whether sewing garments, home dec., or quilts when I sew a seam: I press.

    —Carol Gerlach on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is so very important. I am a new quilter and my teacher stressed how important it is to "press" (not "iron"), especially when one quilts. I come to quilting from dressmaking and where it is equally important. I look forward to the book.

    —Gail Griffith on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve been accused of being too precise but I never let it bother me because I always pressed quilts a I constructed them as well as clothing I have made. My friends and relatives who sew with little pressing in the construction process cannot understand why their quilts and garments never turn out as nice as mine. I believe that if you decide to do something, you might as well do your best to do it well. You’ll feel good about what you did in the end.

    —Carol A. on June 5, 2014
  • I have used a pressing plan for my blocks and when I do things go togeTher sooo much easier. I put together a top yesterday that had really been carefully and thoughtfully constructed. I had made the blocks about 10 years ago and I am trying to get UFOs completed. It went together so smoothly and I kept thinking about how nice it will be to quilt even though there are so many seams ( log cabin setting) because all the seams are so orderly.

    —Barbara on June 5, 2014
  • I can not tell you how bad I need this book. I have been trying over and over again to make a 16″ block only to keep unpicking and trying again. I am not sure what I am doing wrong. I have had lots of suggestions but still not going well.

    —cheryl on June 5, 2014
  • My general rule is to always press to the dark. When I have multiple seems sewed together with a larger piece,I always press to the side that reduces the bulk of too many seams overlapping. Most of all, pressing is key to beautiful construction!!!

    —Judy on June 5, 2014
  • Absolutely. Pressing is very important. I love pressing during the piecing process. It makes the blocks come alive. Thanks for chance to win this book.

    —Glenda Britten on June 5, 2014
  • I can not tell you how bad I need this book. I have been trying over and over again to make a 16″ block only to keep unpicking and trying again. I am not sure what I am doing wrong. I have had lots of suggestions but still not going well.
    Thanks for the chance to win one.

    —cheryl on June 5, 2014
  • I try to do a pressing plan but usually doesn’t work!!! I need help with that. I just clip to fit.

    —Donna on June 5, 2014
  • I have never heard of a pressing plan. The idea intrigues me because up until now I simply felt that controlling the outcome was too complicated for me to even begin to control. I am so tired of bulky seams!

    —Suzanne Zakis on June 5, 2014
  • I always press my seems open unless I am going very light to dark fabric and then I press to the dark side. I also use a little spray starch on the finished blocks as I press them before I add the sashing–helps to keep the blocks flat and accurate while pinning. You can never press too much.

    —Barb Gentry on June 5, 2014
  • I recently started taking classes on quilting, and was told by the gal teaching class when I asked if there was a specific way to iron the seams that it did not matter! Now I know why my quilt top looks a bit wonky.

    Sharee on June 5, 2014
  • Never heard of it-I’m a beginning quilter.

    —Jan C. on June 5, 2014
  • I always make a pressing plan because it helps you to organise your time more effectively

    —Marthese on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve never heard of a "pressing plan", but I think I have an intuitive one in my head when I go to the ironing board.
    thanks!

    —Linda Erickson on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve never heard of a “pressing plan”, but I think I have an intuitive one in my head when I go to the ironing board.
    thanks!

    —Linda Erickson on June 5, 2014
  • After all my years of quilting I still end up repressing seams so will lock together. Very frustrating. Donna’s book looks like an essential tool for every quilter.

    Diane H on June 5, 2014
  • I usually think about how I should press my seams so that when I actually construct my quilt it will lay nicely. However well thought out the plan, it doesn’t always work out. At least I try. Thanks for the chance to win a wonderful book!!

    —Jill on June 5, 2014
  • I am new to quilting after sewing clothes for about 40 years. I have never heard of the phrase "A Pressing Plan." I guess I need this book!

    —Robin in New Jersey on June 5, 2014
  • A "pressing plan" is what I often end up with by the third or fourth block! It seems obvious that I should think about that before I make the first block, but I never did.

    —Nancy Adams on June 5, 2014
  • This is a super neat book and one I would love to read and use!!!!! Thanks for the chance!!!!!

    My fav thing to do is spray Best Press on fabric before I ever start to cut up FQs. Also use it on the blocks before I finish squaring them up.

    —Janet E on June 5, 2014
  • Oh I so need this! I never know which way to press my seams, have tried "press to the dark side" but that doesn’t always work. Thanks for the chance.

    —Sunnybec on June 5, 2014
  • A pressing plan is what I often end up with by the third or fourth block! It seems obvious that I should think about that before I make the first block, but I never did.

    —Nancy Adams on June 5, 2014
  • I try to have a plan for pressing before I sew each block together so that all the seams butt neatly at the intersections. Then when you pin them and sew them together they match perfectly. You should figure out how many rows you will have and then press the first row to the left and the second row to the right and then alternate until you reach the final row.
    Try to press towards the dark fabric. Don’t drag your iron across the fabric, especially if you have cut on the bias. Gently lift your iron on to the fabric pressing the seam that you sewed first to set it and then flip the fabric open and press along the seam line.
    You can also try fabric starch when you press, but be picky and buy the good kind.
    If you want to reduce bulk, especially at a Y seam you may want to set the seam first and then press the seam open.
    I love ironing. My grandma Gladys took in ironing to earn a little extra money. She used to sprinkle everything with water and put it in a plastic container in the fridge in the morning and then she ironed it in the afternoon watching her ‘stories’.

    Penny Duane on June 5, 2014
  • A pressing plan is what I often end up with by the third or fourth block! It seems obvious that I should think about that before I make the first block, but I never did.

    —Nancy Adams on June 5, 2014
  • I press carefully, but I don’t have a plan set out ahead of time. Now I’m going to be more diligent on that note! It makes sense.

    —Susan Stanton on June 5, 2014
  • My first quilting teacher stressed pressing so I press everything. I have my ironing board & iron at sitting level so all I need to do is swivel around & press. If I had to keep getting up, I probably wouldn’t press as much.

    Thank you,
    Stephanie S.

    —Stephanie S. on June 5, 2014
  • I try to wash and press my larger pieces of fabric before cutting. But I do have several quick tricks, using a "wooden iron" (Nancy’s notions) or a bone folder (used in paper folding to get a sharp crease, these can be made from bone, wood, or other stiff materials), and even a small iron with interchangeable tips. The bone folders, if heat proof, can also be used with a full sized iron to hold small seams open, or closed. Running the bone tool over the seam prior to pressing may enable you to avoid holding down the seam with your fingers, making pressing quicker as the fabric is "pre trained" to go where you want.

    —Karen on June 5, 2014
  • I don’t have a "Pressing Plan" but I do try to think ahead as to the block construction and the best way to press before I go to the ironing board. I always press each step of the block as I sew-they fit together so much easier and nicer! When I am sewing is about the only time my iron gets used!

    —Debbie on June 5, 2014
  • Oh I have a pressing plan alright, but it appears that one or two seams get pressed in the wrong direction after I have sewn the seam, (or so it seems) very frustrating when I have only been quilting for 1 year. Need more help so I do not keep using my seam ripper.

    Laurie Travis on June 5, 2014
  • I don’t have an actual plan, but I do know the importance and try to look ahead when pressing seams so that things nest up as best they can. This book would be so helpful!

    —Carol Vickers on June 5, 2014
  • In quilting, I’ve ruined more quilting efforts by not pressing correctly than with any other "sin" I could commit.

    —Claudia on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is very important to me, especially if you are planning to hand quilt in the ditch. Nothing is more frustrating than to have that big hump of seams in corners. I have done lots of hand quilting in the ditch for others and the first thing I look for is how well the seam crossing are pressed. Punch and stab works, but is not the greatest look on the back of the quilt. I thoroughly agree with Donna that pressing is most important. Your quilt lays much better when well pressed.

    —Alvina Nelson on June 5, 2014
  • I always try to follow the arrows shown in the pattern, but am rarely totally successful. I could use a lot of help.

    —Betty Jansen on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing Plan. Not really, sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t. However, when I don’t I really wish I did when it comes to finishing. Can’t wait to see the book.

    —Kathy on June 5, 2014
  • I always press, but I do not have a Pressing Plan. It is a great idea.

    CBB on June 5, 2014
  • I wouldn’t say I have a pressing plan. However, I do know that it is important to press as you go. Looks like I need this book to learn more.

    —Susan on June 5, 2014
  • I don’t usually have a pressing plan but I make sure to follow the instructions when pattern indicates it…and boy do I appreciate it!

    —Roz on June 5, 2014
  • I am not sure what happened with the comment above. It won’t let me edit it or delete it. So I will try again.

    I wouldn’t say I have a pressing plan. However, I do know that it is important to press as you go. Looks like I need this book to learn more.

    —Susan on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing can help things come together so nicely, so I always press. Do I always to it correctly… maybe not.

    —Vicky on June 5, 2014
  • I haven’t always had a plan, but am becoming much more aware that a plan is, if not necessary, advisable. It certainly makes piecing easier.

    —Deborah DeBerry on June 5, 2014
  • I always press my fabric and blocks. I put my ironing board a good distance away from my machine, for ergonomic purposes. Thanks for the chance.

    —Janie on June 5, 2014
  • I usually have a partial pressing plan but always seem to end up with some seams going the wrong way.

    —Pat on June 5, 2014
  • Tried to leave a comment and got a weird notification. So repeating. I haven’t always planned my pressing, but am fast becoming aware that a plan is extremely helpful in piecing ease.

    —Deborah DeBerry on June 5, 2014
  • It is easier to press if you have the ironing board set close to your sewing machine. Pressing is necessary to make a great quilt.

    —Lynn on June 5, 2014
  • Yes, I have a pressing plan and press my blocks right after stitching. However, I could certainly use more tips on pressing. Quiltmaking Essentials 1 sounds fantastic and I would love to win a copy. Thanks for the great giveaway!

    —Bonnie H on June 5, 2014
  • Still being new to the piecing process, I depend upon the pattern instructions for pressing guidance.
    Haven’t quite felt that magical "lock together" feeling that I’ve heard so much about though.

    thanks for the giveaway opportunity!

    —Jetta on June 5, 2014
  • I must get my hands on this book! I don’t have as much time as I would like to quilt, and I very often don’t plan my pressing properly. Just looking at the description of this book tells me that it would always be close at hand in my sewing room!

    —Sharon on June 5, 2014
  • Press every step of the way…participating in a Round Robin. Received a Newbie’s piece and it had not been pressed and I am afraid that her quilt will tent in the middle when it is done. Did talk to her and let her know how important it is to press the seams well.

    —Connie Higgins on June 5, 2014
  • I also thought you when toward the darkest fabric. Who says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks?

    Lynn on June 5, 2014
  • would love to get that book

    —marj durling on June 5, 2014
  • Always Always Always – it makes such a huge difference

    —Terri on June 5, 2014
  • Having a pressing plan makes so much sense. I always press my seams as I go, but never think ahead, and now I wonder why. As a new quilter one of the things I like most about it is the need for precision. As a Virgo I have always been all about precision too! So having a pressing plan is a great idea. Can’t wait to win the book and get started on my next quilt. Kathleen

    —Kathleen Pearson on June 5, 2014
  • Having a pressing plan makes so much sense. I always press my seams as I go, but never think ahead, and now I wonder why. As a new quilter one of the things I like most about it is the need for precision. As a Virgo I have always been all about precision too! So having a pressing plan is a great idea. Can’t wait to win the book and get started on my next quilt. Kathleen

    —Kathleen Pearson on June 5, 2014
  • I always press. I always have a pressing plan. However, having a plan and being able to carry it through are two different stories. Inevitably, when the quilt begins to take shape and becomes larger, the pressing becomes confusing and despite all my careful diligence, seams apparently take on a life of their own and go awry.

    —Linda Edwards on June 5, 2014
  • Yes, I’m happy to say I know about a pressing plan! I love it when I can "nest" my seams so everything matches up so much better. I learned that from my dear friend Jane, and my small group friends have reiterated the importance of it over the years. Makes a HUGE difference… both in matching and how the "flatly" seams lay. It’s a great tip!

    Susan Mulvihill on June 5, 2014
  • I always press. I always have a pressing plan. However, having a plan and being able to carry it through are two different stories. Inevitably, when the quilt begins to take shape and becomes larger, the pressing becomes confusing and despite all my careful diligence, seams apparently take on a life of their own and go awry.

    —Linda Edwards on June 5, 2014
  • It would be really nice to have a such good referensbook to go.

    —Mai-Britt on June 5, 2014
  • I can figure the geometry, its the pressing plan I look for and greatly appreciate in pattern instructions. My guild’s block of the month’s usually include it for pieced blocks so you get consistency from so many different block makers. On my own, I’m more trial and error and might be half way through before I "get consistent".

    —Karen Falvey on June 5, 2014
  • As a math lover ~ precision is the name of the game! The idea of a pressing PLAN is intriguing.

    —Lorelei on June 5, 2014
  • I always press but I don’t have a pressing plan. I need this book!

    —Cheryl F. on June 5, 2014
  • pressing is so important to things fitting together properly. and not ironing but carefully pressing so as to not stretch the blocks.

    —Mary on June 5, 2014
  • I would love this book, a pressing plan certainly sounds like a great plan. I look forward to the leftie tips something that is often forgotten,

    —Donna Hawley on June 5, 2014
  • I try to plan but sometimes I do not plan well

    —Cindy Balin on June 5, 2014
  • Time to relearn. I have to admit, I’ve been doing a lot of clipping. The book sounds invaluable.

    —Diane on June 5, 2014
  • A pressing plan–most definitely. Each step of the piecing process goes together so easily if pressing is done diligently and towards the right fabric or open seams. I recently tried to change a pressing plan published in a book pattern thinking I was a little wiser. Was I wrong. Near the end of the top construction I discovered the reason why the pressing plan had been set out as it had. Now I check the published pressing plans to the end of construction to see if it is the best way to press pieces before I make any of my own adjustments. Test blocks are a good way to check out pressing plans in your own designs.

    —Audrey on June 5, 2014
  • I’m finding now that if I look a ahead and plan for pressing I have more success in my piecing.

    —Jaye Gause on June 5, 2014
  • I am a presser. I press flat before pressing to the dark side and I can sometimes plan where to press before quilting but not always easy especially with a large quilt. I learned from error—I was hand quilting a wall hanging and never thought about the seams. Well, talk about a nightmare trying to quilt through all those layers.
    Her book would certainly be a staple to have on the book shelf. A how to book of knowledge.

    —Helen on June 5, 2014
  • I always press. Have a mini iron right beside my machine and press each seam as I sew.

    —Joy on June 5, 2014
  • Starch press cut sew=perfection

    lynne mulcahey on June 5, 2014
  • I wish this book was around when I first started to learn to quilt. I learned by trial and error. . . . more error and a lot of "un-sewing".

    —Nina on June 5, 2014
  • What a novel idea…a plan!

    —Pat Limburg on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing correctly makes a quilt come together very quickly. No worry about trying to make a block fit by gathering or stretching. Makes for a quilter’s smile!

    —Robbie on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is the hardest thing for me to do. I never know if I’m doing it right.

    —Sharon Ingalls on June 5, 2014
  • I learned the hard way that there is definitely a difference between pressing and ironing. I now press and try not to iron or stretch to make the piece right. One has to measure and cut precisely & not press or iron to adjust the size. Happy quilting everyone.

    —Barbara Dolan on June 5, 2014
  • Never thought of preplanning how to press…but I know I like it when patterns include details of which way to press. Great idea to include details of pressing in a basic quilt book!!

    —Lorraine on June 5, 2014
  • I too received an an error warning – so apologies if this appears twice.

    I wish I had this book when I first learned to quilt. I learned a lot of things by trial and error – actually more error leading to ‘un-sewing’. The pressing to the dark doesn’t always work especially when you are making star blocks. Sounds like a great book to have as a reference when planning new quilt project

    —Nina on June 5, 2014
  • I learned the hard way that there is definitely a difference between pressing and ironing. I now press and try not to iron or stretch to make the piece right. One has to measure and cut precisely & not press or iron to adjust the size. Happy quilting everyone.

    —Barbara Dolan on June 5, 2014
  • I never thought about a true pressing plan. I can see from the illustrated block that a plan is necessary for better fit of the pieces. Thanks for the chance to win!

    —Debra G on June 5, 2014
  • Sometimes instructions call for pressing under a raw edge 1/4″. I use a large index card as a quide, since the lines are 1/4″ apart. It makes a much more accurate seam than eyeballing it. Another trick is to sew a line of basting stitches 1/4″ from the edge and then press under.

    —Bonnie Goodrich on June 5, 2014
  • Heard of it, used to know about it, but left quilting for a number of years and upon my return, FORGOT HOW! Tell me….

    —Margaret Lind on June 5, 2014
  • I only started quilting a couple years ago and I’m never sure which way to press the seams so I just press them open. It takes more time, I’m sure and I’m told the joining isn’t as strong. I would love to have a pressing plan. This sounds like a book I need to have, not just for pressing, but for lots of other skills as well.

    —Stella on June 5, 2014
  • I have seen patterns with a pressing plan but don’t make one of my own.

    —Elaine on June 5, 2014
  • I agree that quilting is so much more enjoyable when the seams line up perfectly. Sometimes I need a little help in making the decision of which way to press them.

    —Michelle on June 5, 2014
  • I have invested money (lots) in quilting and I’m self taught but I’ve never been completely happy with end results – with this said this book will give me the basics that is needed to justify not only the money invested but the time and if I can get the basic from an expert I say YES either way I will put time an effort to learn -thank you Donna for the opportunity. Sincerly

    —Marjorie silva on June 5, 2014
  • HI,looks like a very neat book!
    Yes,I try to pay attention to how I press!
    Thanks for sharing!

    —LINDA on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve always been a careful presser. I don’t always have a set plan but I usually know which seams are going to need to be ready to intersect and press accorgingly!

    Beth Strand on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is really essential, and I always steam my seams. HOWEVER, I always air or let the pieces rest a bit, because moisture in a sewing machine eventually ruins the parts. I like the pressing illustration for the churn dash block – one I am working on right now.

    Gail G on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing plan?!? Oh my goodness, something else I didn’t know I needed to know! I am a newbie 🙁

    —Jinger on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing plan?, definitely have not heard of a pressing plan. I thought all seams were pressed to the dark. I really have a lot to learn and would love to own this book. Thanks for the giveaway

    Cindy on June 5, 2014
  • This book sounds like what everyone needs. We get so complacent and lazy in our methods and need a gentle reminder how to do things right.
    Looking forward to reading it.

    Linda

    —Linda Wiebe on June 5, 2014
  • I never knew the importance of precision until I saw a friend pressing her work one day and how beautiful her work came out, seams all matched and she had no seams turn over. I hope to become that good someday and maybe just maybe this book will help me.

    —Grams on June 5, 2014
  • Yes I press even though I hated ironing when I was younger it save a lot of time later

    Donna Davies on June 5, 2014
  • My iron is one of the most important tools in the sewing room!

    —Judy on June 5, 2014
  • No matter what I’m sewing I always press each seam as soon as I sew it. Press light color toward darker color. Learned that as a 9 year old many years ago in 4-H Club.

    —Jane K. in Ohio. on June 5, 2014
  • I was mostly self taught and have always had trouble with accuracy so this book sounds like something I could definitely use! I’m very curious about the curve in strips sets and have on occasion wondered if there is a rule of thumb for pressing seams open. Thanks for the opportunity to win this book!

    —Pam H on June 5, 2014
  • I am good at pressing as I go, pressing light to dark. Sometimes the fabric just naturally wants to go a certain direction, so I let it. But no I don’t have a plan.

    —Kathy Hancock on June 5, 2014
  • I have heard a little about pressing and I try to pay attention and press so that my seams lock when I put sew pieces together. I also found that I like starching everything, it just makes things go easier. I also lock my seams and press after every seam. I am sure that I have lots to learn and I am eager to learn more.

    —Tina on June 5, 2014
  • i really don’t have a ‘press’ plan but I always press to the bulk is not the same direction when sewing pieces and blocks together.

    —Aloya on June 5, 2014
  • Always press and maybe sometimes too much (yes, I’ve scorched before). Now I’m confused as there seems to be two schools – toward the dark color or open.

    —Tanya on June 5, 2014
  • I always determine a pressing plan before sewing a block. I do really appreciate patterns that include pressing diagrams in the instructions.

    —Mary Ann on June 5, 2014
  • I have never heard of a pressing plan but I do press and try to press to the dark and butt pressed edges so they are opposites

    —Suzanne on June 5, 2014
  • I have to say, I’ve been well trained to "press, not iron" as I go. I used to think it was a time wasting activity, and I could move my project along by pressing periodically, but the first time the seams don’t line up, or you have a "bump" at an intersection, it becomes a "lesson learned" to quote my first teacher.

    —Karen on June 5, 2014
  • How a I LOVE quilt patterns and publications that include pressing directions in the instructions. Without that guidance, all too often I’ve ended up pressing seams in a way that turns out to be a problem at a future step of quilt construction. Sounds like this book would help.

    —Bette Ingoglia on June 5, 2014
  • I always press as I’m going along, but I don’t have any kind of "plan". Do I need one ? :-\

    —Kay on June 5, 2014
  • Try to have a seam pressing plan when I start (if one is not given with pattern I may be following) but it never fails that somewhere along the way the "plan" seems to fall apart. Would love the book, there is always something new to learn or something that has been forgotten.

    —April on June 5, 2014
  • I need a pressing plan. sometimes it goes along fine til the end. Help.

    —Joan Stoltz on June 5, 2014
  • I press toward the dark but have a great deal trouble "pressing" and not ironing. Would be a great book to learn better habits.

    Lyn Kaufmann on June 5, 2014
  • I "try" to have a plan of pressing, but i find sometimes without a pattern that specifies exactly what to do, I have to stop and try to remember the when to do what with shapes/colors etc etc… thanks Molly

    —Molly on June 5, 2014
  • I try to press according to instructions… but get lazy sometimes! I do try not to use steam now…

    Susie on June 5, 2014
  • I try to do a pressing plan but sometimes get confused

    —Elaine on June 5, 2014
  • I believe this book would clarify what I think is a "pressing plan" and make my piecing that much better.

    —Elaine on June 5, 2014
  • I always press my seams, even if it is only finger pressing for the immediate sewing. Pressing is the heart of the block!

    —Janet T on June 5, 2014
  • I know that it is important to press at every step, but I am not familiar with the pressing plan.

    —Bridget on June 5, 2014
  • I do not have enough experience that I have planned out the pressing myself. I do follow pressing suggestions on patterns though, as I love the proper nesting, flatness of the finished project. I am very interested in this book, to learn the planning side.

    —Cat Turner on June 5, 2014
  • Wow…a quilters bible a must have! I never have formed a plan for pressing seams. What difference it would be….

    —Konnie Osborne on June 5, 2014
  • I wish that all pattern designers and publishers would show pressing plans. They have finished the quilt and should know what is ahead.
    It would also help to know if we should press open or to one side.

    —ANN on June 5, 2014
  • Making a pressing plan before you start your quilt is always a good idea. This book looks great even a good book for a seasoned quilter.

    —Denise Holland on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing correctly is a must. It is not always easy or fast, but it makes a huge difference in the finished quilt. How do I know? I am a long armer who quilts for customers and 75% of my clients quilts would look so much better if they had a "pressing plan".

    —Janice Mc Laren on June 5, 2014
  • Absolutely! A pressing plan is very important if the quilt top is to turn out flat and crisp looking. It really helps to think about how distribute the bulk in the seam intersections so the seams lay flat & neat. As a long arm quilter, I have seen pressing plans that have been used and also ignored. If a piecer presses (as they assemble the quilt top/block) with the thought of how the finished product should look, the finished product will look wonderful. IMHO, pressing as you piece with a plan in mind needs to be taught to be more important as cutting accurately and sewing accurately. After all, even if a quilt top is not put together precisely, but is pressed well, it will still look great. Just as in wearing clothing, if an unpressed, wrinkled designer outfit is worn, it will look as sloppy as an old sack.

    —Vicki Sprain on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing. sometimes I think ahead to what is going to be attached to it, but that is really the only plan I have for Pressing. 🙁

    —Julie Craven on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing plan, YES! I love when a pattern already has one. Makes life much easier. Thanks for a chance to win your book.

    —Janet Nykiel on June 5, 2014
  • I plan my pressing as much as possible. Sometimes I get two seams pressed the same way and just work with it. It’s much harder than when they nest. I had not thought about sitting down and planning my pressing from the beginning, but it makes sense. The book sounds great!

    —Virginia in AK on June 5, 2014
  • I need a new category – most of the time. When it is obvious, I do it. Sometimes, I just can’t figure out what it should be and then I wing it. I regret that I didn’t plan it.

    —Kay Lee on June 5, 2014
  • I also like to plan how I am going to press my seams in my quilt. I love it when everything lies flat and no extra bulk , also makes it easier to sew things together.

    —Sharon on June 5, 2014
  • Sometimes. I usually regret it when I don’t.

    —Kay Lee on June 5, 2014
  • I always plan which way to press seams so they fit together and I don’t need to repress later on. I just didn’t know there was a name for that. Looks like a great book, hope i win, thanks for the chance!

    —susan on June 5, 2014
  • Never heard of press planning, I always decide as I go and, of course, some seams get quite thick in the end…

    —Noemy on June 5, 2014
  • I normally do not make a pressing plan. The last class I took was 60 degree triangles and the teacher talked about pressing before we even started cutting. When I think about it a pressing plan would make a big difference in the look of the finished product. This book looks like something every quilter should have!

    —Nancy on June 5, 2014
  • I’m one who goes to the dark side… repressing if needed. A plan sounds like a great idea, but I tend to edit layout on my wall. Guess the engineer in me has to put in it’s two cents.

    —TRACY DVR on June 5, 2014
  • This is an area that often drives me crazy. I love it when pattern designers include a pressing plan. It makes everything go so smoothly. When there is none, I try to come up with a working plan, but inevitably, I make mistakes. I would love to be able to look at the pattern in advance and make a pressing plan that works.

    Susan G on June 5, 2014
  • I always press as I piece, but I’ve not considered a pressing plan. Always new things to learn.

    —Karen A on June 5, 2014
  • I have found that careful pressing is essential in quilting. Have nice flat seams that alternate directions is critical when trying to line up pieces. Bulk in the final product makes for a difficult time quilting at the end, too.

    As a relative newbie, I have consulted a number of beginner’s books and have found few that address pressing. Does seem like pattern designers would be better off including directions about this…because it does make a huge difference in the final product.

    —Kate on June 5, 2014
  • I press as I piece. I find the more detailed the block, the more careful I am about pressing but I always use care not to stretch a block. I use the standard press the seam towards the dark but there are some block patterns which requires different pressing plans. I love it when the pattern designer tells their thoughts about pressing.

    —Nona on June 5, 2014
  • I plan the pressing on my blocks and quilts as much as possible. The intricate blocks can be a pain in the patootie…and you can always add sashing if it gets to tricky!

    Bari on June 5, 2014
  • I believe in pressing plans. There is a special place in my heaven for pattern designers who include them. In blocks with many pieces or where one cuts up a larger block and swaps the cut segments around, and there are diagonal seam, I always end up with twisted seams in the final stages of construction. Being able to deal with this would really bring my piecing up another notch.

    —Sandy on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing plan makes ta block come together perfectly-or not! Your book sounds like a great resource for new and experienced quilters. Thank you~ Diana

    —Diana Williams on June 5, 2014
  • Was interesting learning the difference between ironing and pressing!

    —Cindy on June 5, 2014
  • I usually always press toward the dark color and always try to have seams pressed in opposite directions so when I’m stitching a seam together they create a flatter seam.

    —Susan Stone on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve always tried to have my seams pressed so as to "nest" my seams. When the time arrives to put it together there is always something that didn’t quite make it. This would be a great book to find out where I’m going wrong.

    —Catharine on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve always tried to have my seams pressed so as to nest my seams. When the time arrives to put it together there is always something that didn’t quite make it. This would be a great book to find out where I’m going wrong.

    —Catharine on June 5, 2014
  • I try to plan in advance but if the blocks get turned or I change plans on the go I sometimes repress.

    —Lisa on June 5, 2014
  • I keep my ironing board and iron right next to my sewing machine, so that all I need to do is turn and press. I find that this encourages the process and speeds up my sewing. Your book sounds like a winner – which is what I’d like to be!

    —Kathy Biciocchi on June 5, 2014
  • I know there is a "right and wrong" way to press, but when I start to do it, I can never remember the "right" answer. I sometimes use pressing incorrectly as when I state " I’m going to press this square until it fits right!" Probably not the best use of steam. Although I have been quilting for awhile, I probably have more to learn than I know about some proper quilting techniques!

    —Patty on June 5, 2014
  • I do think about how the pieces will go together when I’m pressing. I’ve had only one pattern that included complete instructions for which way to press every seam. It was so nice not to have to think it through myself.

    —Theresa on June 5, 2014
  • This is a book that would have been helpful when I started quilting.But I need to late to learn something new or easier way of doing things. Would love to win this book!

    —Kim Waknitz on June 5, 2014
  • I don’t make a pressing plan, just press to dark colors whenever possible. But I think making a plan sounds like a good idea and would like to know how to make the plan.

    —Joanna on June 5, 2014
  • Always press, when you have wrinkled fabric & after you piece, you will get perfect seams. This is an awesome book for a beginner, as well as for a experienced quilter. We forget the fundamentals, when we think of trying something quicker, or this will be faster, ya know we have all done it. Then we realize why it didnt work. We didnt stick to the fundamentals that we learned.

    —Linda King on June 5, 2014
  • Now that I’m retired, I’m excited to be coming back to quilting! One thing that always confused me was pressing multiple-seam intersections. I ended up with a few more lumpy spots than I cared for. 🙂 Sounds like this book is just what I need!

    —Loretta Henslick on June 5, 2014
  • I always press, but sometimes the wrong direction! I just finished my first paper-piecing top and pressed all seams open. I confess; I’ll be glad to go back to pressing to the side and I’ll pay better attention to which way!! This book is definitely on my wish list since I’m a new quilter (only 5 years!)

    Linda Shumway on June 5, 2014
  • Now that I’m retired, I’m excited to be coming back to quilting! One thing that always confused me was pressing multiple-seam intersections. I ended up with a few more lumpy spots than I cared for. Sounds like this book is just what I need!

    —Loretta Henslick on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing….this is the one item that always seems to be forgotten when I do my own designing, and then I step up to the iron and begin trying to decide the best way to go. Unfortunately, I find myself more often than not having to re-iron a block so that my seams will nest neatly. I love a pattern that has an ironing recommendation. This book is a must for my quilting library.

    —Susan on June 5, 2014
  • I always press as I go. Those seams going the right way, laying flat on the back of my blocks, make me feel all is right in my world.

    —Jill Ellis on June 5, 2014
  • I always press as I go. Those seams lying flat on the back of my blocks make me feel like all is right with my world.

    —Jill Ellis on June 5, 2014
  • I try to think about which way to press, but can’t say I have a plan! Probably need one!

    —Jeannine Stoddard on June 5, 2014
  • As an older quilter I enjoy finding easier and better techniques.
    Pressing is always a challenge to make my quilts even on the back. I
    would enjoy the book!!!! Sassy

    —Sassy Foster on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing Plan? I just press as I go. I like to see the flatness and enhancement of the project that pressing as I go does.

    —Pam Lewshenia on June 5, 2014
  • I do have a plan of sorts in my mind as I’m peicing my blocks. It may not be right but I currently press towards the dark when possible. This cuts down on seams facing the same directions not always but on average. I have learned you can’t always win on this thought. When this fails I press away from the center. Even this doesn’t always work but at least I start out with a plan 😉

    —Michele Cais on June 5, 2014
  • I always press often with a plan in mind. I have trouble when I switch blocks around to more pleasing positions and the pressing no longer allows the blocks to nest

    —Ellen on June 5, 2014
  • I do have a plan of sorts in my mind as I’m peicing my blocks. It may not be right but I currently press towards the dark when possible. This cuts down on seams facing the same directions not always but on average. I have learned you can’t always win on this thought. When this fails I press away from the center. Even this doesn’t always work but at least I start out with a plan. Thank you for the opportunity to win this fabulous book.

    —Michele Cais on June 5, 2014
  • I wear as much cotton as possible–of course I press or it looks slept in. When I begin a new project. Wash first, press ALL fabrics to be used, and press along the way. Pressing should never be an option. I look good, my projects look good! Enough said 🙂

    —Donna Philip on June 5, 2014
  • I don’t have a pressing plan but always press my quilt seams. Lately I have been reading about quilters who press their seams open and have been trying that.

    —Judy on June 5, 2014
  • What is this? Should I be concerned?

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    Hi Donna,
    Sorry, we had some technical issues with the comments section of the blog yesterday, but they are fixed now. We do apologize for the inconvenience!
    ~Cornelia

    —Donna Philip on June 5, 2014
  • I think of the finished quilt and blocks and plan how I will press the seams-to one side or split open (I prefer not to have open seams as the batting can come through some). I press each block-this gives me a clue as to whether the block is correct and sides are straight. If the block doesn’t look right, I make corrections to the block or rip out and start again or adjust my cutting and start from stratch. Pressing as you quilt works the best for analizing and making changes if needed. I would love to read your book to see what I need to improve on. thank you for reading. Lanette

    —Lanette Powell on June 5, 2014
  • A pressing plan? Yes! I learned just how important a pressing plan is when I made a log cabin quilt with at least ten different kinds of blocks in it. Because the person who designed the quilt also told us which way to press each seam, the whole thing went together beautifully. Of course, that doesn’t mean I’m rushing to start another log cabin quilt.

    It is extremely helpful when the designer includes the pressing plan. It’s too bad that doesn’t happen very often. I’m going to tell the designer of the log cabin quilt I made just how grateful I am for her doing that. I just hadn’t thought of doing that before.

    —JoAnne T. on June 5, 2014
  • Please put my name in the draw for this much needed "How To" book. It would be very reassuring to have this guidebook of experience on hand whilst I am learning the basics of patchwork.

    —Joan on June 5, 2014
  • Yes, i press. I am new to quilting and friends have emphasized press, press, press. Lol.

    —Curran Donna on June 5, 2014
  • Oh this book sounds perfect for me! I’ve always been a stickler for details and discipline when I start a new craft medium but haven’t had much luck finding a book that suited my needs and this sounds perfect. The main thing I’ve learned in sewing doll garments is to iron with the grain of the fabric so I don’t stretch it out of shape. Thats been a huge help to me in keeping my garments looking perfect and not going all wonky on me after a wash.

    —Cheryl on June 5, 2014
  • Well not sure what happen with my post but it seems to of gotten munched! grrrr Hate it when that happens!

    Hi Cheryl,
    Sorry about that! We were having some technical issues with the comments, but they are all fixed now.
    ~Cornelia

    —Cheryl on June 5, 2014
  • I always press as I go along, but I never thought of planning in advance. Seems logical and probably prevents the need to repress.

    —Rivka Hamdani on June 5, 2014
  • I definitely learned the hard way when I gave a quilt top to a long armer for quilting having NOT pressed ANY of the seams in any of the blocks. I got it back with less than the bare minimum of quilting and was not at all pleased with the end result. So now I press every seam if not once then twice to make sure every lays out perfectly. And then the top gets pressed again before going to my long armer.

    —Sue Fender on June 5, 2014
  • Yes, I try to plan ahead when it comes to pressing, but sometimes even the best plans go astray!!

    —Debbie R on June 5, 2014
  • Sounds like the "quilting bible". Every quilter should have a copy!

    —Barb E., highlands Ranch, CO on June 5, 2014
  • I’m a newbie quilter and I found this to be tremendously informative!

    —jane d on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing small seams always seemed smart to me, but not that important. Then I made a baby blanket with the help of a friend. She was VERY particular about pressing the seams, and it made a HUGE difference. So now I pay much more attention to that seemingly unimportant detail when I am quilting as well.

    —Michele Dawson on June 5, 2014
  • I always press, but have a hard time with multiple intersections like those in a pinwheel block. I like the idea of having a pressing plan for an entire block!

    —Sarah Evanko on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is very important! Otherwise, your blocks can go wonky when you don’t want them to.

    —Janet on June 5, 2014
  • Would love to know more about a pressing plan. I try to be consistent but sometimes can’t quite figure out how it will all work together. I could definitely benefit from this book for my cutting as well I think.

    —Cher Merriman on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing, I have heard of it but not until I started watching Eleanor Burns. Now I do not know how to have a pressing plan all the time, I sometimes have to repress the opposite direction as I go.

    Laurie P on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve never heard it called a "pressing plan", but I do put a moment’s thought into how I’m going to press each seam, with the idea to have each block fit together perfectly into the quilt top. I’ve never completed the "perfect" top yet, but I’m enjoying the journey!

    —Kathy Brigham on June 5, 2014
  • I always press as I go when putting my blocks or strips together. Whenever I’ve attempted to not press, It doesn’t work. I end up removing the stitches, pressing and re-sewing the piece.

    —Thelia Smith on June 5, 2014
  • I always press as I go. It does help

    —Jeni on June 5, 2014
  • I press pretty religiously. I don’t sit down and think it through a lot though. The last block I made, I put one strip together and pressed the seams light to dark. When I did the next strips I had to stop and think how to press those seams so that they would "fit". But I don’t get into it more then that.

    Jess on June 5, 2014
  • I have a plan, but it doesn’t seem to work out.

    —Ruth on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is very important to me. If my seams are not pressed, it is hard to make the seams match when sewing. They tend to roll or shift out of place.

    —Janet T on June 5, 2014
  • I don’t know the difference in ironing and pressing. Most of me quilts have turned out well so far but there have been some squares when the pressing plan wasn’t right and created extra bulk in areas. I look forward to the book to learn some new pointers.

    —Norma Honey on June 5, 2014
  • I love blocks that come with a pressing plan in the instructions. I’m not so good about planning ahead to make my own plan.

    —Joan on June 5, 2014
  • I just press when I come to the place where I will have to cross a seam I have not pressed yet; then I press everything I can, and go on sewing until the next juncture.

    —Sarah on June 5, 2014
  • I try to plan which way to press seams so they "lock" and I don’t have they all going the same direction, but sometimes end up with bunches. A way to plan them would be great to learn!

    —Sandy A in St. Louis on June 5, 2014
  • pressing does not equate to "ironing", care much be given to not stretch the fabric when pressing. Sometimes a light hand is better!

    —Mary Ann Baker on June 5, 2014
  • Only recently learned the difference between "ironing" and "pressing" so a "pressing plan" is new to me, too!

    —Marty on June 5, 2014
  • I am a new widow requiring me to have to move from my home, my fabric, my quilt resources such as Quilting Essentials. I am trying to restore my favorite books and your giveaway would be a special blessing and encourgement.

    —Connie Douty on June 5, 2014
  • I’m a beginner at quilting as I finally have the time now that I am retired. I would love this book to help me learn the basics. Just learnt that pressing and ironing are different!

    —Liane Foord on June 5, 2014
  • I would love to know how to press properly. I definitely have no plan just do it as required. A copy of the book would really help and certainly improve my piecing.

    —Susanne on June 5, 2014
  • Hadn’t thought about it that way, but it would likely save having the occasions of the butting seams being pressed the same way. I’m sure there would be something in this book for us all to benefit from.

    —Kerry on June 5, 2014
  • I always press after each step. Yes it takes extra time but everything looks and fits together nicely.

    Jan Jeppson on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve tried to stick to a pressing plan but, sometimes I don’t know if the iron is on the wrong setting or to much pressure, pressing. They (pieces) sometimes strech,curl,distort just get ugly. Would love a copy of Quiltmaking Essentials 1, maybe then I’ll get it right.

    —Dot on June 5, 2014
  • I’m a newbie. I haven’t even finished my first quilt! I have been reading and watching YouTube videos to learn all I can about quilting so I do it at least almost right the first time. This is the first I’ve heard about the quilting plan. Wow, there is so much to learn! But I love learning new things 🙂

    —Jacqie Cowles on June 5, 2014
  • Looks just like the book I sure could use to improve my quilting!

    —valerie csmith on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve never heard of having a pressing plan but I know that I need to pay attention to direction so things nest nicely.

    —Adele on June 5, 2014
  • Sounds like this will be an amazing addition to my quilt library. I hope to be able to use it when I teach new quilters the "proper" way to do things…not for the quilt police but just to make their piecing more precise and their quilting experience more enjoyable! Thank you for the giveaway!

    —Lori B. on June 5, 2014
  • I have always been on the fussy side of pressing – due to some really annoying gaffs made in my early quilting days – and usually have a little hand-drawn pressing map, pinned to the end of my ironing board (and another piecing map next to my sewing machine, Lol!)

    My son and his fiance live with me and she has really been bitten by the quilting bug. Unfortunately, I work days and she works nights, so the opportunity to be there and step in to explain the basics doesn’t happen often enough. The result is usually a few "Grrr…!!!" moments when she’s trying to put blocks or rows together followed by a bit of unpicking and wheedling Mumma to stitch it together again! 😀

    I think that Quiltmaking Essentials 1 (& 2!!) would be a terrific addition to our bookshelf.

    —Kayt Deans on June 5, 2014
  • I used to think that "I don’t need to press, what a waste of time." Then I went to a quilting retreat where a lady showed me the BIG difference of pressing verses not pressing. I now press every seam, but wonder if I’m doing it the right way. Just reading the information in this article gives me reason to want to learn more! Plus all the other information I could use from this book.

    —Margaret Clubb on June 5, 2014
  • I know pressing is important. I now keep my ironing board lowered to a nice height, and I only have to turn my chair a little from my sewing table to my ironing table. But, I still don’t know which way to press the seams. And, try as I can, I still can’t get the seams to go the opposite direction when pressing a row to attach to another row.

    —Sharon Howell on June 5, 2014
  • When pressing pieces I try to plan ahead so that my seams will go together nicely but usually end up having to re-press some of the pieces. I like your idea of making a pressing plan before I actually start the project.

    —Linda Webster on June 5, 2014
  • I formulate a pressing plan for the blocks or sections, but sometimes still run into trouble when they go together or sashings are attached. I would love it if a pressing plan were included on all patterns! And I would love to read your book!

    —karen Falk on June 5, 2014
  • never heard of it

    —Kathy Luehrs on June 5, 2014
  • A pressing plan? not here – so I think I might need to read this book! lol thank you!

    —Lee on June 5, 2014
  • I’m a fanatic about pressing … but I can’t really say I plan it in advance. I work it out as I go to have seams going in the proper directions to nest together nicely. An advance plan is an intriguing idea!

    —Mary G on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve never heard of a pressing plan before, but it makes total sense to have one. I’ll do this from now on!

    —Kathy E. on June 5, 2014
  • I usually do not have a plan. I go by which way the pattern calls for. I have not been quilting that long to know which way to press the seams.

    —beth daniels on June 5, 2014
  • I always try to figure out which way to press each seam so that the blocks play nice together. Sometimes it works…..

    —Barb Johnson on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is always essential for any quilt even when all you want to do is finish the block/quilt. I would certainly like to learn more tips, you can never know it all, like life you are always learning.
    Judy

    —Judy on June 5, 2014
  • I sort of make up a pressing plan as I go along!

    —kathy on June 5, 2014
  • I try to press to the dark side and if seams will match, press where they will nest together. Otherwise, I just "wing it" with pressing my projects. A pressing plan would be helpful!

    —janice on June 5, 2014
  • I am just getting started in the quilting world and I am scared. Ihope I can do this.this book would help a lot.

    cindy on June 5, 2014
  • So I have to admit, I might suffer from OCD. I couldn’t dream of jumping head first with out a plan. Especially for my seams. I enjoy planning every detail of my quit right down to the smallest. 😉

    —Mindy on June 5, 2014
  • Pressing is a must for me. I find I have a much better finished product when I press.

    —Colleen on June 5, 2014
  • I am a "self taught" quilter. I’ve learned the value of pressing but I’ve never learned such specifics as a "plan". I would love to know how to have more accurate stitching without being obsessive! lol I think quilting is much more rewarding when things turn out the way you plan.

    —Cheryl Strayer on June 5, 2014
  • Your book Donna, sounds like a conversation rather than a lecture and I know it will be an important ‘tool’ in every quilter’s toolbox! Just from what I’ve read so far, you make it easy to understand and follow! Thanks for making Precision a good word again! Hugs, Deb

    —Deb Johnson on June 5, 2014
  • I am pretty new to quilting and am intrigued to learn more about the correct way to press.

    —Kathy Smith on June 5, 2014
  • Presser! I’ve only been quilting 2 years, but in all the quilts I’ve made, pressing has made the difference between having an even block and a catywhompus one. Press always 🙂

    —Becca on June 5, 2014
  • I always press as I’m sewing. I’ve started using "Best Press" fabric spray and it makes everything so much easier because the squares stay square and diagonals don’t stretch! Always press!

    —Roberta Kennedy on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve never heard of it – but I’ve only been quilting for a short time.

    —Karen Cohn on June 5, 2014
  • I follow the instructions if told which way to press, otherwise I generally press open.

    —Ashley on June 5, 2014
  • I always press and I usually try to figure out how to press to help the pieces fit together better when I am joining them.

    —Renee Stapleton on June 5, 2014
  • Ummm, pressing plan?? I’ve been quilting for more than thirty years and now I find out there’s a pressing PLAN! My pressed seams have been "the good, the bad and the ugly". I’m excited about a plan! Now, what else don’t I know???

    —Joyce on June 5, 2014
  • I never thought of it as having a pressing plan, but I guess that is what it was anyways lol. I am always trying to think a few steps ahead of where I am so that I can avoid clumpy seam intersections. I have even pressed some seams open (I can almost hear the gasping) because it made the most sense. Whatever works, right? I will be watching for your book!

    —Carol J on June 5, 2014
  • I’ve never heard of a pressing plan but I have often thought that there should be a better way to press quilt seems so that they come out better. I wish I could read it right now so that I could put the idea into practice now.

    —Cindy Dahlgren on June 5, 2014
  • I try to use a pressing plan but don’t stress out it it’s not working

    —Cinzia on June 5, 2014
  • ALWAYS! have a pressing plan.. You want your seams to lay flat with NO bulk!

    —Nanette Edmonds on June 5, 2014
  • I love technique books as you can never stop learning and one top or technique can change the out one of your quilting experience and the quilt itself…I do feel lucky. Lucky another good book is coming out and that I might win
    It!!

    Jane Modjeski

    —Mj Modjeski on June 5, 2014
  • At last, a book us southpaws can follow. Even after all my years of adjustment (like, my whole life!), I still having trouble flipping pictures from right handed to left handed. This book will be a lifesaver for me.

    —Lynne on June 5, 2014
  • I understand the concept, but never heard it referred to as a "pressing plan" I know it is important to press away from the bulk of seams and to try to have opposing seams, so that when sewing rows together the seams butt into each for a more perfect intersection. Thank you.

    Doris on June 5, 2014
  • I feel pressing plays a major part in the outcome of a neat and precise block, it’s not finished until pressed.

    —Helen Costner on June 5, 2014
  • I wish I could share my quilting story with you, but it would be much too long for this comment section. So, you will probably know a lot of it when I tell you that I thought pressing seams meant to press them completely open!! That is until I Made My first ever quilt (for my mom) when I was 40+ years old. I was trying to sew 5/8″ seams on a Crazy Quilt made in purple satin and velvet. Thank goodness a work friend came to my rescue and showed me how to press correctly AND create 1/4″ seams. I only distorted 3 12″ blocks which weren’t looking so good anyway. I’m 61 now and I have still never heard of a "Pressing Plan" (except to rip seams and repress when they don’t match like they’re supposed to). So, I’m really looking forward to this book to teach me. Although, I love quilts solo much, in the end, if I never learned a Pressing Plan, I’d NEVER stop piecing!

    —Glenda Castillo on June 5, 2014
  • I need a pressing plan. I did a block today and there is a wonky area in the middle because the seam is not pressed the right way. Always pressing to the dark side does not always work so – I need that plan!

    —Eileen on June 5, 2014
  • A "pressing plan" is not something I Think about, but mostly do automatically sometimes I wait for the next pieces to make sure I press it correctly.

    —ELIZAJANE on June 5, 2014
  • I am new to quilting, but what I learned first was how important pressing is. Your book seems to help everyone who wants to make precise piecing.

    —Timtirim on June 6, 2014
  • Sometimes I have a plan but it doesn’t always work. As I put it together I find one or two seams going in the wrong direction. Besides, I think I iron not press. Probably not good.

    —K on June 6, 2014
  • I always press, but would like guidance on "the quilters rules!".

    —Kathy Feltmate on June 6, 2014
  • Even though I do press as I go I have not heard of the term pressing plan. I love the quilt on the front of the book and hope the pattern is in the book.

    —Sandy D on June 6, 2014
  • Pressing plan – well I have never heard that term before – but on any quilt you need to press and press and press to ensure that everything is lying flat as possible. I press as I go along so I know that when I join the rows they are not all pressed the same way for a build up of fabric.

    —Gwen on June 6, 2014
  • A pressing plan is a good plan for success. it keeps you moving which is important. Sitting is the new smoking!

    —Margaret C. on June 6, 2014
  • Just learning about pressing plans

    —Debbie Pete on June 6, 2014
  • I have never heard of a pressing plan. I will definitely make one now that I know about it!

    —Cynthia West on June 6, 2014
  • Pressing fanatic here…I do plan it out whenever I can. Love everything to be nice and neat!

    Colleen Taylor on June 6, 2014
  • I always press my seams. Can’t say I have a pressing plan though. I do have a hard time with bulky seams coming together.

    —Pat D on June 6, 2014
  • When I have a lot of seams I press them open I believe that my blocks lay better I also use spray like
    Sizing .

    —Shirley on June 6, 2014
  • I always press my blocks, but it is hard to make them all nest together sometimes. Would love to have a copy of this book!

    —Linda Cartwright on June 6, 2014
  • The only pressing plan I know is to set your seams before you open up and press …. I’m not sure how to plan ahead to press the seams in the right direction so they’ll nestle together when piecing .. that’s what I need to learn. Would love to win this book since I’m a lefty and there aren’t many sewing instructional books out there that have diagrams for left-handed sewers.

    —Laurie T on June 6, 2014
  • My plan was to press as the instructions told me to and I am glad I did. I have only made two quilt tops, but find that I actually loved pressing them as it made them look so smooth and I was told they would "quilt up" much better if pressed well and so that all lies flat. I also use a product called Best Press. My next quilt, which I plan to design myself, I will definitely think about and incorporate which way to press! It helps that I grew up making clothing and was taught very early by my grandmother that pressing is the KEY to a wonderful end project. Love & miss you Gram, thanx for all you taught me!

    —Winona on June 6, 2014
  • When Alex Anderson had the Simply Quilts show on HGTV she always stressed proper pressing–since then I’ve learned the need for pressing correctly, always–I continue to use tips & solutions
    learned from Alex & her guests. What joy she so generously shared & taught all of us. Yes, as I said, pressing is an essential tool.

    Thank YOU ALEX!

    —BARBARA on June 6, 2014
  • Using a pressing plan sounds logical. I do try to figure out in advance which direction to press, but somehow my seams always manage to be going in the wrong direction is more than one place. I started making quilts to relax, but sometimes I find myself more stressed when things don’t quite work the way I thought they would. I could use some good tips.

    —Mary Ann McG on June 6, 2014
  • Knowing ahead of time how to press each piece of the block would certainly be a time saver – what a great idea! Book sounds like it is full of useful information. I would love to have a copy!

    —Nancy on June 6, 2014
  • Okay well will give this another try…..lol…… I don’t always have a pressing plan although I try to have things nest as often as possible! However that being said the book looks to me to be a great starter guide as well as a refresher for those of having traveled farther along the quilting road. Congratulations Donna on a great book.

    —Tonie Peterson on June 6, 2014
  • Been quilting for years but I still end up sometimes pressing seams in the wrong direction-would love to know how to develop a pressing plan!

    Elaine on June 6, 2014
  • Having recently completed a quilt with 2,025 squares, i would have been thrilled to know how to make a pressing plan before assembling! Sounds like a book that will improve anyone’s quiltmaking. And i love tip boxes !!

    —Marlene Coates on June 6, 2014
  • I usually follow a pressing plan if they give you one in the pattern instructions, but I sometimes have to re-press seams in the opposite direction as I construct a block to get the seams to nest.

    —Mary on June 6, 2014
  • I have not heard of making pressing plan before starting. It seems like a good idea. Many times I have gotten into a project and wished there was a way to anticipate where the seams would end up.

    —Shawna Empey on June 6, 2014
  • I always have a pressing plan. I hand quilt all my quilts and often press seams open if I know i am going to quilt across seams. This reduces bulk and makes it much easier to hand quilt these areas.

    —Vicki Zoller on June 6, 2014
  • I agree that having a pressing plan Is worth the extra time and effort and makes a huge difference in the final outcome.

    —Dorothy Wilson on June 6, 2014
  • I’m finally returning to sewing and quilting after 34 years. I need all the learning I can get, since SO MUCH has changed! I am the one who really NEEDS this book. Plus, I can then teach my granddaughter the correct techniques as she begins her sewing and quilting journey.

    —Karen Helms on June 6, 2014
  • When I first began quilting, I did not use a pressing plan. Once I started to use one, I was surprised at how much of a difference it made on the final results of my project.

    —Phyllis Wichert on June 6, 2014
  • Have quilted for years (largely self taught), but still go back to various books I have to look up things or check that I have remembered a particular process correctly. Would be nice to have an ‘all in one place’ reference book.

    —Barb Forde on June 6, 2014
  • I am excited about this book. I am in the process of making my very first quilt and the pieces are not fitting together!!! I realized that in cutting some of them they are a quarter inch to small. Now I have to buy more fabric. I agree with you, if you want a quilt to look nice, you have to have good techniques. If I don’t win the book , I will buy it!

    —Cheryl on June 6, 2014
  • I make each block to the same point, then stop and press, then continue on to the next phase. I always press! It makes a huge difference. That is my plan and I’m sticking to it.

    —Helen E Young on June 6, 2014
  • I have made block sketches with arrows showing how I plan to press, so I guess I do know what a pressing plan is. However that does not mean that I always get it down right. This book would be most useful.

    —Crazy Cuban on June 6, 2014
  • I do follow some pressing guidelines. I have pressed to one side and open depending of the project. But I am sure I have things to learn, and the book seems useful.

    —Nancy Angerer on June 6, 2014
  • Pressing plans are always important. But, I have to admit, that sometimes I forget to have one before I start. And, then I usually run into a problem with seams going the wrong way. So, I need to remember to always create a pressing plan!

    —Donna W on June 6, 2014
  • I try to have a pressing plan, get frustrated midway through when I have to re-press the opposite way, and then give up and just sew the seams … It seems complicated and I think I could use some training so my plan actually works for a change!

    —Elaine Judd on June 6, 2014
  • I absolutely agree with Donna’s statement that precision is not about pleasing the quilting police but rather building skills for a lifetime of quality quilting. I’ve been teaching for 25 years and know that precision is what growing as a quilter is all about.

    —Gayle McFarlain on June 6, 2014
  • Of course I press, but not so sure I do it the best way. Pressing plan sounds interesting! 🙂

    —Inger Martinson on June 6, 2014
  • I do make a "pressing plan", but I never heard it called this before. Like others when I first started quilting everything was pressed towards the darker fabric. That’s great until you want to put blocks together and seams don’t nest together. Now I think about how blocks will be joined and make a plan for pressing. Sure keeps this quilter happy.

    —Julia Stavran on June 6, 2014
  • I find pressing is the most important thing in having a nice flat block. I press after each piece is added, and usually toward the dark, but not always.

    —Jenny Moore on June 6, 2014
  • Since I have just started quilting, I have heard conflicting information on pressing. I’m glad that there is a resource for the correct way to not only press but to complete the other "basic" parts of quilting. Thank You!

    —Julia on June 6, 2014
  • My pressing plan: After I sew each row and number them, I take a pin and put it in one direction for each row. Placing the sharp end towards the direction that the row is to be pressed, in the first block (left side). That way, if I get called away, I don’t have to think about it when I return, I just keep going. If you have numbered pins, even better!

    —Stephanie on June 6, 2014
  • As a fairly fussy and precise person I wish I’d heard about your book earlier. But as in most endeavours learn early so I’m thrilled that there is a book out there that fills my needs. Never too late to relearn and I don’t have too many years of bad habits-quilt wise that is.

    —Glennis Vetter on June 6, 2014
  • I’m a bad presser….Need to change my ways.

    weezie on June 6, 2014
  • I like the idea of a pressing plan, but have no clue how to devise one – this book might be just what I need!

    —Margaret Lawrence on June 6, 2014
  • I always press seams. I love how the seams lie flat. Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Renea on June 6, 2014
  • Pressing plan….now isn’t that a brilliant idea! It would make my quilt tops even better, and reduce some frustration.

    —Alison on June 6, 2014
  • I never thought of having a pressing plan, but what a great book! I’m sure I could learn a lot from this. Pick me!

    —Sue on June 6, 2014
  • looks like a good reference book

    —Caroline on June 6, 2014
  • Yep, I try to always plan ahead my pressing directions…make lots of mistakes since I’m still a beginning quilter…but still try! 🙂
    This book sounds like a great reference – especially for a beginner like me! Thanks for the opportunity to win a copy!

    —Diane Dashevsky on June 6, 2014
  • Although I always press, I’m not completely sure what a pressing "plan" is. It sounds like it would be extremely helpful to my quilting to find out. Thanks for the opportunity.

    —BusyButtons on June 6, 2014
  • I’ve been quilting for 33 years and I’ve never heard of a pressing plan. I need this book!

    —Cindy J on June 6, 2014
  • I love to press so I can see how the block is coming along.

    —Sherril M. on June 6, 2014
  • I have ironed my blocks, never heard of a pressing plan. I think I need to get a pressing plan, it seems, I have been doing it wrong all these years! Who said an old dog can’t learn new tricks? lol

    Janice Aistrop on June 6, 2014
  • I rarely press. I wait till I am at a stopping point on my project, then dry press. I also steam press older fabrics in my stash that have crease lines.
    Thanks for the giveaway,
    Jacqueline in Pitt Meadows

    Jacqueline VH on June 6, 2014
  • I always press, I don’t like patterns that do not provide a pressing plan so that your block will come together.

    —Gina on June 6, 2014
  • I am a self-taught quilter but also read everything I can get my hands on–well about quilting that is. What a happy day when I learned about "opposing seams"! And an even happier day when I chose an intricate pattern (not knowing how intricute it really was) with the "pressing plan" already in the instructions! Pressing really is important to our success. Thanks for a book with all the skills needed for us to succeed!

    —Fran May on June 6, 2014
  • I have never developed a pressing plan. When following a pattern, I USUALLY follow the pressing directions but do not correct the seams I press incorrectly. I press to one side. The only seam I press open is the one that butts lengths of binding together since I stitch binding down by hand.
    I will pay more attention to pressing in general for better looking piecing.

    —Lynne on June 6, 2014
  • I always press. I have been sewing since I was 12 and it was one thing my mom pressed into my brain with clothes so with quilts it was natural. I have seen quilts and clothes done without pressing and the results were not pretty.

    —Tammy L. on June 6, 2014
  • I was taught to press 50+ years ago — so always press as I go, usuall toward the darker fabric.

    Bev R on June 6, 2014
  • The book looks just like what I need! Today I was sewing, I had two different charm packs, one was exactly 5″ the other one was about 5 1/4″, so now I have to go back and cut every one of the larger ones to make things come out even! I got the charm packs to make things easier on me and now I have more work!
    Jackie Powell

    jackie on June 6, 2014
  • I learned about pressing plan from a quilt teacher several years ago along with considering pressing seams open instead of to one side if it makes joining easier.

    —Regina Harris on June 6, 2014
  • I resisted it and still do, but it really does make a difference.

    —Allison C on June 6, 2014
  • Wow! So many of us needing and wanting your book. I’m self-taught and could really use your pointers. I get so frustrated when seams don’t match up. Thank you for being one of those people who, like me, really do care about the process and the outcome of all their hard work!

    —Karen Capellman on June 6, 2014
  • Pressing is something that I hear a lot about and try to do properly. It sounds like I really need this book as a fairly new quilter.

    Susan Paxton on June 6, 2014
  • I would love to see what Donna Lynn Thomas has to say about pressing. On the quilt I am presently making I am using steam because that’s the last advice I read, next time it will be dry and each time I will stand there and wonder what I could do to get it right every time!!

    —Juliet Wood on June 6, 2014
  • A pressing plan sounds like a good idea I had never thought of it

    —Jo on June 6, 2014
  • I love patterns which tell you how to press. If they don’t, I fumble around pressing and undressing. I would love to learn how to develop a pressing plan.

    —Riley Middaugh on June 6, 2014
  • Two comments: 1) Press means set the iron down without directional movement. This is essential to avoid distortion in pieced work.

    2) Cover a 1/2 inch thick piece of 20″ x 60″ plywood with batting and cotton and place in on your ironing board for a larger working surface. I’ve added two horizontal strips of wood to the bottom to keep it in place on my board, too.

    —Ev Pieczonka on June 6, 2014
  • I love it when there is a pressing plan given. Many times I’ve had to remake a block or rip out stitches to get the pressing just right.

    —Marianne on June 6, 2014
  • Pressing has always been important during my project/sewing process. However confusion sets in when the question arises as to which method/technique should I follow for the very best finished product.
    So whatever mood I am at the moment do I think, or just press, whichever way the material tells me to press.

    —Deloris Baldwin on June 6, 2014
  • I find it helpful if a pressing direction is indicated in the pattern….but it often is not and then I press toward the dark but sometimes that is not the right direction when the intersections don’t nest in the right directions…I don’t always think about what is the next step down the road before I decide which direction to press.

    —Rosalie on June 6, 2014
  • Years ago when learning to sew garments in Home Economics, I was taught "always press seams open". This worked well for garment construction. Then as I have learned (or tried to learn) how to quilt I have been told, by most, to press to the dark. I do know from experience that pressing makes everything look nicer and fit together much better. Looking forward to learning more from your book.

    —Sarah G. on June 6, 2014
  • I always, always, always press!

    —Bridget on June 6, 2014
  • I have tried all methods, press as I go, press at the end, press with my fingers, stream iron, dry iron. I still have problems, I need help with mastering the beast of a iron.

    —Karen Thew on June 6, 2014
  • Absolutely I press, essential in quilting in my opinion. We all could use a refresher and new ideas. Love these types of books

    —Debbie Yarbrough on June 6, 2014
  • I always press. Things just come out right when I do. Imagine that? Doing what I’m supposed to do. I would love to win the book. I know it will become well in a short time. Thanks for the chance.

    —Charlene McCullough on June 6, 2014
  • Always have a pressing plan.

    —Jo Anne on June 6, 2014
  • Always, always, always! Anything sewn looks better pressed, always!

    —Janey on June 6, 2014
  • For years I did pressing for a living. I have heard of a system. Like press to the dark but remembering all the ends and outs I got lost. When I saw opening seams on a quilt show, at first I was not impressed, but some areas it works better than anything else. I always enjoy reading what others think works better. when you do the quilting part it can make all the difference to the outcome, especially if you hand quilt.

    —Linda Christianson on June 6, 2014
  • I need to press more

    barbara woods on June 6, 2014
  • Pressing is essential to a good-looking quiltblock/quilt. However, I have tried to skip this step in my quiltmaking-with less than satisfactory results. Lesson learned!

    —Karen Funk on June 6, 2014
  • I’ve never heard the term ‘pressing plan’, however in some patterns I have they do tell you in each step which way to press the seams as you go. I am not experienced enough yet to know myself if I were going to make a sampler quilt using multiple blocks I like, which direction to press each of the seams to make it all lay nicely when done. I’d love to read what she’s got to say about that and learn more so that I am not dependent upon any pattern.

    —VickiT on June 6, 2014
  • I never heard the term "Pressing Plan". I usually will follow the directions given in the pattern that I am working with. Sometimes that means following the press to the dark rule, sometimes it makes more sense to press so that the seams nest better for the project. My biggest pressing challenge seams to be making a good crisp seam with out pieces overlapping each other. Your book sounds like a great resource and I want to thank you for a chance to win.

    Jamie Todhunter on June 6, 2014
  • I always press after each seam, or set of seams when chain piecing, but have always wondered if there were some particular way of pressing, or as it’s called here, a pressing plan, I would love this book, as I really want to become more precise in my quilting, and to always improve.

    —Cindy Dahlgren on June 6, 2014
  • I have never heard off a pressing plan. I would LOVE to see the results of nicely planned pressing and sewig.

    —Bev Jackson on June 6, 2014
  • Once I learnt the difference between ‘Pressing’ and ‘ironing’ my quilting has progressed nicely. This book looks exciting and informative….

    —Marie on June 6, 2014
  • I do try and press the seams to nest, but sometimes pressing seams open works the best. It just depends on now the quilt blocks behave themselves. Then there’s always the machine who has its own idea on how the seams should lay. Its never the driver of the fabric(ME).

    —Rita S on June 7, 2014
  • I have lots of books but might be tempted to buy this one if it would help make things go faster.

    —Marlene Hahn on June 7, 2014
  • I think I have a tentative pressing plan when I start but it may change as I piece. I always try to press seams, though, since it makes measuring, cutting, and sewing more exact. This books sounds like a good resource!

    Carol Kussart on June 7, 2014
  • Sooo much to learn, but I love quilting and your book looks like it would be very beneficial for anyone to read. Thanks for all the time and effort that went into it.

    Pamela Krieg on June 7, 2014
  • I’ve never heard of a pressing plan, but I always follow the instructions given with a pattern. However, not all patterns have pressing instructions. Also, I’ve often wondered if you’re supposed to move the iron back and forth over your seams and blocks or if you’re supposed to place the iron on the seams and fabric – I guess that’s the difference between pressing and ironing? Would this book address these issues?

    Hi Diane, thanks for your comment. The answer to your question is yes–Donna absolutely covers these issues in her book! –Jenny

    —Diane C on June 7, 2014
  • I also try to look ahead if its a complicated pattern. Other wise I just press to the darkest side or on curves where it naturally wants to go. Maybe I could learn something new from this book. Thanks for the chance to win it. Have a great day

    —Julie Craven on June 7, 2014
  • Pressing plan? The only thing I plan on is making sure I don’t leave my iron on when I leave the house! LOL

    —Patricia on June 7, 2014
  • Pressing is very important.. I keep my iron right near the sewing table and press as I go. I do end up frustrated when I discover later on that something should have been pressed in the other direction in order to fit right with the next block, row, section, etc. This book sounds great!

    —Jeannie on June 7, 2014
  • Sometimes the pattern writer will let you know to press seams open or to one side, but I have never sat down to figure it out myself. A good idea! Thanks for the give away!

    —Jacklynn Grimm on June 7, 2014
  • I know that it’s wonderful when the seams all come together nicely. And I like it when the instructions include pressing directions. But it never occurred to me to sit down ahead of time and work out a pressing plan. What a great idea! Thank you.

    —Pearl on June 7, 2014
  • I used to get paid by my sisters to iron their laundry and do touch-up ironing and I still love to iron and press. Would not dream of sewing without by iron by my side.

    —sybil williams on June 7, 2014
  • I am new to quilting, mostly squares and rectangles. Any of the TV shows that I have seen always press, so I automatically started pressing. I think it makes the finished product look more professional. It also makes the fabric pieces easier to work with. Thank you for the giveaway. Any hints would be helpful.

    —Virginia Bronner on June 7, 2014
  • Sim sempre… pressiono muitas vezes abertas… (Translation: Yes … when I press often open …)

    liege welsch on June 7, 2014
  • Growing up I did most of the family ironing (I was the oldest of six children)and actually enjoyed it! Ironing and pressing helps our wardrobes look their best and it’s also extremely important in sewing, whether it’s clothes making or quiltmaking. My irons are important tools I can’t do without for a quality product.

    —Elena on June 7, 2014
  • Hello
    I am a fan of Patchwork, and I feel terrible when I go to join the blocks and do not match the drawings, I try to join the board and blocks.
    I hope to read this wonderful book to see the techniques and tricks that have,
    regards
    Marta Pilar

    Marta Pilar on June 7, 2014
  • I always (almost always) press my seams but I hadn’t thought out how to press so the seams play nicely. If the pattern says press one way then I will but a plan, not me. Thanks.

    —Mom C on June 7, 2014
  • Always!!!! So much easier to join sections and square up. And pressing gives a much nicer finished product.

    —Helen on June 7, 2014
  • I learned to press at my first quilt class, but I admit I sometimes "iron" to try to stretch a piece or seam to get it to behave.

    —Cindy S on June 7, 2014
  • As a longarm quilter I know how important a pressing plan can be. In the long run it makes your quilts easier to assemble and they lay flatter for quilting. I would love to win a copy of your book. Thanks for the opportunity to win.

    —Deanna on June 7, 2014
  • I always press — my mom insisted on it when I was learning, and I still do it because it just makes things easier and the final project better.

    —Mary P on June 7, 2014
  • When I took my first quilting class, they did talk about pressing and why it was important. But most patterns don’t talk about how to press, so I find as I am putting all the blocks together I sometimes have to redo the pressing.

    —Collette M on June 7, 2014
  • I do try to "nest" seams and press to dark where possible, but sometimes it "seams" like they have a mind of their own. Any solutions to this is your book?

    Hi Donna, the short answer to your question is yes. In fact, Donna devotes seven pages of her book to the topic of pressing. One special tip she includes in the book is what to do when you’ve mistakenly pressed seams in the wrong direction, which may help with the specific question you have. Thanks for your comment! –Jenny

    —Donna on June 8, 2014
  • Never heard of pressing plan, but after trying to get seams to nest on my last quilt, I can see where you need one. I spent too much of my sewing time re-pressing making the quilt a very frustrating one.

    —DebV on June 8, 2014
  • I’ve always known pressing is important but I never thought of a pressing plan before- probably because I’ve never made very complicated blocks or quilts either. I can see that it will become more important as I develop my skills into more complicated patterns. Thanks for the advice!

    —Julie Zeigler on June 8, 2014
  • I just realised that making a quilt is not as simple as it seems to be.
    Precision is very important and I believe it is a good habit to have.
    can’t wait to have a copy of this book to learn the basics.

    —Judy Quah on June 8, 2014
  • I learned about pressing when my girls and I took a sewing class out where we live. Pressing makes your pieces look nicer and straighter, it holds better.

    —Sunnie on June 8, 2014
  • I started quilting when I retired 2 yrs. ago, so I am still learning. I have sewed for many years, so always pressed my projects as I went. I don’t have a pressing plan when I piece and not sure whether to press seams open or to the dark side of the fabric. I guess alot. Thanks.

    —mildred plaskett on June 8, 2014
  • Yes, first I set the seams, then press them. My sewing room is upstairs and my ironing board is downstairs. This way I get some exercise while sewing. I would probably finish a quilt faster if I didn’t have to run downstairs to press but I like to get up and move around.

    —Cindy Schultz on June 8, 2014
  • I always press the seams. Makes for a cleaner look.

    —Leah on June 8, 2014
  • The section on pressing sounds interesting. I always have problems knowing which direction would work best for the block I’m making. Sometimes I’m working on a block and find that it would have been best to press a seam the opposite way from what I did press it. Then I probably already have a seam making it impossible to press the other direction… very frustrating. It would be nice to have a way of planning the pressing layout.

    —Margie on June 8, 2014
  • Don’t forget that starching helps with the pressing! That’s something I learned about two years ago and it has improved my quilting skills immensely.

    Calista Schafer on June 8, 2014
  • I always press. It just looks better. It’s funny since I never iron my clothes. In fact I had to buy an iron & ironing board when I started quilting because I didn’t have one.

    —Susan Clarkson on June 8, 2014
  • I follow pattern directions when they are there. When not I press to the darker fabric.

    elr on June 8, 2014
  • I have heard of having a pressing plan, but have no idea how to create one that goes beyond pressing to the dark side! I do prefer to press as I go. I think my accuracy is much better and the it makes the block look better, too.

    —Elizabeth Tallau on June 8, 2014
  • My first quilt teacher taught us the importance of pressing as you go and pressing seams in opposite directions whenever possible. It helps a lot.

    —Elaine on June 8, 2014
  • I generally do not have a plan for ironing much…especially my clothes, but I know when sewing it is very important to be a diligent presser and your seams will turn out so nice. Doing so also make quilting and sewing much more enjoyable.

    —ruby t on June 8, 2014
  • I always press the blocks (hand or machine sewed) before putting these together. One can work more preciselly that way.

    —Agnes on June 9, 2014
  • I learned pressing from Eleanor Burns, where our seams would lock in place for a neater and precise design. NO, off center squares or HST points being cut off. I generally press to the dark side, but if doing patches in no particular order, my first row is to the right; second row to the left; and third row to the right, and continue to alternate my rows or blocks in this manner. No "humps" for me.

    Keep smiling,

    Lynnita Shipman on June 9, 2014
  • I press and spray starch!

    Meg Jewell on June 9, 2014
  • I always press and press a lot, maybe too much and oops sometimes it might be more like ironing-sorry. Sometimes I need a "basics" lesson and look in my stuff or online for right info and sometimes just keep going to get to the end.
    Cheers
    Carol*

    —Carol on June 9, 2014
  • A pressing plan? Always! My first quilt course over 30 years ago used scissors and templates and taught us how to hand quilt. A pressing plan is critical when hand quilting so that you aren’t stitching through unnecessary multiple layers. I don’t hand quilt much these days, but I still plan my pressing because it makes a big difference when assembling the quilt top and later when quilting.

    —Betty on June 10, 2014
  • I try to press to the darker side, but it doesn’t always work out that way. Use a lot of starch any direction that I press.

    —connie b on June 11, 2014
  • I am an novice quilter, but when I made my first quilt with half square triangles I did not have a pressing plan. Well lo and behold when I started to sew my blocks together, I had a problem, because my seams were pressed every which way and would not piece together neatly or evenly. Before I made the second quilt I went on the web and read everything I could find to teach myself how to quilt properly. I read that a quilter should press seams light to dark if there is a possibility of your dark material showing through to the light. From then on I press my seams that way and also I try to press so there is no bulk in any designated area, so when I do my final finishing my quilt lays nice and flat. I draw diagrams of my planned quilt similar to what was shown on this site. I do recommend pressing, but not sliding your iron across your material, but holding it down for a few seconds on the seam, because the material may stretch, then there again creates another problem when you get to the final piecing together, the blocks will not be even sizes. I never realized how much quilting entails, but I love it. I admire all the people who takes the time to write books, design patterns and teach quilting. I taught myself from reading books and watching videos on the web, because where I live there are no fabric stores and definitely no instructors close by our little hamlet. I would probably have to travel at least an hour and a half for instructions. Thanking all quilt book writers and pattern designers from the bottom of my heart because I now have a new hobby that I enjoy doing in my retirement.

    —Rose Masuda on June 12, 2014
  • I am an novice quilter, but when I made my first quilt with half square triangles I did not have a pressing plan. Well lo and behold when I started to sew my blocks together, I had a problem, because my seams were pressed every which way and would not piece together neatly or evenly. Before I made the second quilt I went on the web, read books and purchased magazines to teach myself how to quilt properly. I read that a quilter should press seams light to dark if there is a possibility of your dark material showing through to the light. From then on I press my seams that way and also I try to press so there is no bulk in any designated area, so when I do my final finishing my quilt lays nice and flat. I draw diagrams of my quilt plan similar to what was shown on this site. I do recommend pressing, but not sliding your iron across your material, but holding it down for a few seconds on the seam, because the material may stretch, ( depending on the grain) this may create another problem when you get to the final piecing together, the blocks may not be even sizes. I never realized how much quilting entails, but I love it. I admire all the people who takes the time to write books, design patterns and teach quilting. I taught myself from reading books and watching videos on the web, because where I live there are no instructors close by our little hamlet. I would probably have to travel at least an hour and a half for instructions. Thanking all quilt book writers and pattern designers from the bottom of my heart because I now have a new hobby that I enjoy doing in my retirement. "Happy Quilting!!!"

    —Rose M on June 12, 2014
  • only when it is in the pattern. I have tried to do it on the fly as I am putting pieces/rows together. I have yet to be successful.

    —Amy on June 12, 2014
  • Press and spritz! That’s the trick. Doing it in the right direction? That’s a trick too sometimes! I would love to win this book as I can use all the tips I can get.

    —Michele Cais on June 15, 2014

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