Patchwork from the past, reimagined on a small scale (+ giveaway!)

“My whole life is in that quilt. It scares me sometimes when I look at it. All my joys and all my sorrows are stitched into those little pieces. When I was proud of the boys and when I was downright angry at them. When the girls annoyed me or when they gave me a warm feeling around my heart. And John too. He was stitched into that quilt and all the thirty years we were married. Sometimes I loved him and sometimes I sat there hating him as I pieced the patches together. So, they are all in that quilt, my hopes and fears, my joys and sorrows, my loves and hates. I tremble sometimes when I remember what that quilt knows about me.”

—The Standard Book of Quilt Making and Collecting,
Marguerite Ickis, 1949

From A Prairie Journey

We’re grateful to author Kathleen Tracy for sharing her love of history with us, uncovering stories from the past about women and their quilts. That connection continues in Kathleen’s latest book, which we’re thrilled to introduce to you today: A Prairie Journey.

A Prairie Journey

Kathleen presents 13 small quilts that explore ties to the past, each inspired by yesterday’s traditional blocks and today’s reproduction fabrics. You’ll be whisked back to an era when the classic quilt blocks of today were just making their debut.

Projects from A Prairie Journey

You’ll love stitching these small, sweet projects, including Wagon Wheels:

Wagon Wheels quilt

Crossing the Prairie:

Crossing the Prairie quilt

and Welcome Home:

Welcome Home quilt

Or, immerse yourself in the tradition of friendship quilts on a small scale, featuring autographed blocks from family and friends:

Friendship is a Sheltering Tree quilt
Friendship is a Sheltering Tree

Vintage photos and the words of pioneer women from the mid-nineteenth century sprinkled throughout make this beautiful book extra special.

Today Kathleen is our guest writer, here to tell you more about A Prairie Journey.


Kathleen TracyWhen I first became interested in quilting, I fell in love with small antique quilts with their simple, naïve look and their childlike charm. Doll quilts of the past and the scrappy reproduction quilts that were popular then inspired me. They seemed easy enough for me to master, and so I began to make small quilts for my daughter’s dolls and embarked on my quilting journey. Soon after, I became interested in history as well, as a way of finding out what I could about women living in the nineteenth century and the quilts they made.

The six books I’ve written for Martingale have all included my three loves—women’s history, small quilts, and reproduction fabrics. The quilts in A Prairie Journey were inspired by my passion for these. The book tells the story of the settling of the West during the mid-nineteenth century through the words of the women and the pieces of scraps that were stitched into quilts. It was a significant journey for many women in nineteenth-century America.

Aunt Sarah's Scrap Basket quilt
Aunt Sarah’s Scrap Baskets

I always love to include tidbits of history in my books, and you’ll find that making these little quilts with reproduction fabrics and traditional blocks is a way of stitching the past into the present.

The quilts I’ve designed are small and simple. If there’s one thing I know, it’s that quiltmaking doesn’t have to be a complicated art in order to satisfy the soul. Throughout the centuries, quilting has appealed to novices and experts alike. While we may admire a quilt made with fine stitches and complex pieces—some that are true works of art—we can also appreciate the ones that are made simply. And we can still call ourselves quilters if we piece together simple squares into four patches, like women did years ago.

Child's Play quilt
Child’s Play

Whether you’re a beginning quilter or an expert, I hope you’ll take a journey into the past through the quilts and stories in A Prairie JourneyYou can join me in my Small Quilt Lovers Facebook group as we challenge ourselves to make one quilt per month from the book, starting in August.


A Prairie JourneyMany thanks to Kathleen for sharing her passion for the past with us.

We have a lovely new copy of A Prairie Journey to give away to one lucky winner today! To be automatically entered into the drawing, tell us in the comments:

Do you have a connection to past quiltmakers?

We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win. Good luck! And if you’re ready to plunge into the past with Kathleen, you can order A Prairie Journey at our website and instantly download the eBook for free.

Comments are closed for this post.

Thanks to all who entered the drawing! The winner is Barbara, who says:

“I don’t know any quilters. I have taught myself by watching Craftsy and YouTube videos. I am on my third queen size quilt and have made two baby quilts for a great niece and a great nephew. I would love to have this book. Thank you.”

We’ll email you about your prize, Barbara—congratulations!


554 Comments

  • Both of my grandmothers were quilters and I own quilts made by both of them. I didn’t find out that my maternal grandmother quilted until last year. I only remember her doing embroidery when I was young.

    —Sandy Allen on July 25, 2018
  • what a unique way to display the little quilts – love that hanger that is shown

    Kare on July 25, 2018
  • My mother and grandmother were both quilters, but it was really my older sister who inspired me.

    —Jane on July 25, 2018
  • Yes, I have connections with quilters of the past. My Grandmother had use flour sacks to make quilts. A neighbor we had from the time I was 7 until I was 12 made beautiful quilts. She had an enclosed front porch where she set up her quilting frame.

    —Rita Long on July 25, 2018
  • My Grandma Myrtle was born in 1888. I grew up sleeping under quilts she made.I still have a couple of her ‘good’ quilts which are all pieced and quilted by hand.

    —Louise King on July 25, 2018
  • Didn’t think I had anyone in our family who quilted besides me, but I have received an unfinished patchwork quilt top that my maternal Grandfather saved in a cedar chest. We assume Gram had hand-sewn the pieces together before she died in 1940 when my Mom was a young girl (so I never met Gram but am named after her). I’m so thrilled that this top was given to me, and I plan to finish, display and treasure it!

    —Martha on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother was born in 1905 and was an avid quilter and crocheter. My love of creating with my hands definitely comes from her!

    —Nicole on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made each of us quilts – I never connected with her as a quilter in person, but I have started trying to recreate her work, as the originals were used and loved until they pretty much disintegrated. Unfortunately not much remains.

    —Regina Arlauckas on July 25, 2018
  • My only connection to past quilters is my uncles mother. She grew up in Missouri and whenever I saw her she was piecing a quilt. She made quilts for us to sleep under when I was a girl and she gave us a quilt for our wedding gift. She passed away in the 60″s but I have one of her Grandmothers Flower Garden quilt tops and whenever I take it out I have such wonderful memories.

    —Barb Walsh on July 25, 2018
  • I have no connections in my family to earlier quilters. But I am hoping that with 2 new granddaughters this year I will inspire someone to follow me.

    —Pat on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother and great grandmother were quilters.

    Kristie on July 25, 2018
  • Both grandmothers were prolific quilters, mother did early on. I began handsewing some doll clothes before I started school, but didn’t get to quilting til just after college. It almost immediately consumed my spare time and what money I could afford to spend on fabric and books. Since I retired 😂, I go directly to my studio after breakfast every day but Sunday. Even my granddaughters have their play area in the studio. It’s my life, simple as that.

    —Sue Esparza on July 25, 2018
  • Not in my family, I was introduced to quilting by a good friend. Love the way some of the quilts are displayed.

    —Tamara Isaacs-Smith on July 25, 2018
  • No connection with past quiltmakers. My grandmothers sewed, crocheted, knitted, and embroidered, but no one made quilts. Hopefully, I will pass my love of quilting down to my grandchildren.

    —Susan Torrington on July 25, 2018
  • I understand my great-great grandmother was a quilter, but our side of the family did not receive any of her quilts when she died when I was little. I like to think we would have been great friends and quilt companions had I been a little older at the time.

    —Nancy Thone on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother was a quilter and a professional seamstress and I share both of these gifts with her.
    Her photo hangs in my studio.

    —Nancy Thompson on July 25, 2018
  • I do not have a quilting background in my family. Don’t know that either of my grandmothers quilted. Had to learn on my own. I hope my daughter takes up quilting too.

    —Carla on July 25, 2018
  • My very first quilt book was The Standard Book of Quilting by Marguerite Ickis. I’m the only one in my family who quilts. Love these older designs.

    —Diana DeWitt on July 25, 2018
  • Actually, I do not have a connection to quiltmakers from the past. I learned to knit, crochet, embroider, and sew garments from my mother and grandmother. But oddly enough, no one was a quilter. So, I’m self-taught.

    —Allison Evrard on July 25, 2018
  • The connection I have to quilts from past quiltmakers is the one I receive from reading books such as this one…I love to read about the history of quilt making. Small doll quilts are among my favorites.

    —Cheryl Z. on July 25, 2018
  • We are the lucky recipients of two lovely quilts made by my husband’s great grandmother. I love viewing antique quilts and have purchased a few when they fit our budget. I love using reproduction fabrics and classic quilt patterns to create my own quilts.

    —Maria L Zook on July 25, 2018
  • I have a baby quilt that my maternal great-grandmother made me and a tied quilt that my paternal grandmother made me. My mother quilts and I learned from her and now my daughter is learning from her and me. I’ve been attracted to mini quilts to be used as decoration for quite a while.

    —Katie on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother loved making crazy quilts. She used left over pieces of carpet warp from her sister-in-law to embroider designs.

    —Vicky on July 25, 2018
  • I have no connection to past quilters in our family. Hopefully I will leave a legacy for future family members to enjoy and hopefully follow in my footsteps of quilting. I love this form of art.

    —Barb Dwyer on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t believe that my ancestors quilted but my grandmother was a seamstress and she gave to me a love for sewing that I have transformed to quilting.

    —Mary on July 25, 2018
  • Both my grandmothers and my mother were all quilters. I remember playing on the floor beside the quilting frame as a small child watching them sew. I love to incorporate scraps from various sources and savor the memories. These little quilts are lovely!

    —Kay on July 25, 2018
  • At 99, my Mom is still quilting, although her projects,are smaller, and her sight is fading. Grandma and her sister were quilters as,well as many great-great relatives. we had a house fire, and I lost all of my treasures from the past. I have always enjoyed small and miniature quilts. I need to get this book!

    —miriam on July 25, 2018
  • Yes, both my great grandmother and grandmother were quilters and I have a couple quilts made by them. My mother didn’t have time will have eleven children to keep mending of clothes done. But I love to quilt and in the process of making one for each of my siblings. Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Rita S on July 25, 2018
  • My great great grandmother was an avid quilter -the quilts in the book resemble her quilts very much. I am so lucky to have such a role model and a fabric heritage.

    —Nancy C on July 25, 2018
  • My father’s side of family were Mennonite and beautiful quilters, so my love of quilting is genetic and a huge part of my life.

    —Diane H on July 25, 2018
  • It was my mother who first inspired me to sew. She taught me to make first aprons and bibs and then skirts. By the time I moved out on my own, I was making many of my own clothes. It wasn’t until she and my dad retired that she began to quilt. She made beautiful quilts!!!! I knew I had to do this too! I treasured my vacations alone with her when we would quilt together for a week! I finished many of her unfinished quilts when she passed as I promised her I would. At 85, she told me "I’m not ready to go… I have too many quilts I still want to make." Miss her and treasure the gift she gave to me…….

    —Michele Cowley on July 25, 2018
  • My mother’s mother (my grandma) and my mother both quilted. My first quilt was my attempt to copy the quilt on my bed – a Grandmother’s Flower Garden, made by my grandmother. I quit at crib size – it was more work than I thought. Of course, I was only 10.

    —Janet on July 25, 2018
  • The women in my family has always pieced and or quilted.Like my mother and aunt and grandmother pieced by hand and quilted I do it all by machine.I’m not much on hand work anymore I machine piece an I have a longarm to quilt my quilts.

    —Connie Hopper on July 25, 2018
  • I learned to sew from my mother. She would make our clothes when we were little. As far as quilting she only made doll quilts. I love to decorate with antiques. The quilts I make all reflect the interest of the past. I would truly enjoy this book.

    —Carol on July 25, 2018
  • Unfortunately, my mother nor my aunts quilted. There were no quilts from past generations. I am in the process of changing that for my children and grandchildrdn.

    —Pat Grant on July 25, 2018
  • A fantastic book. Kathleen has really out done herself with this one. Love it.

    —Sue on July 25, 2018
  • I slept under quilts made by my Great Grandmother when I was young, my Mom was a quilter and both of my sisters and I quilt. I love the old traditional patterns and reproduction fabrics so my quilts remind me of Great Grandma’s. I follow Kathy on her blog and enjoy her little quilts!

    —Marsha B on July 25, 2018
  • My Grandmother on my Dad’s side taught me to sew when I was about 13. She made all her own clothes and quilts. My favorite was her crazy quilt with matching curtains. She never used a pattern for any of her sewing, just look at something and made her own designs.

    —Renee on July 25, 2018
  • My connection to past quilters is my dear grandmother. She raised a family of eight on the farm during the depression and with all the chores and hard work still found time to make beautiful quilts. I am grateful for that legacy.

    —Kerry on July 25, 2018
  • My mother made each of her five children one quilt, hers were all by hand from start to finish. I caught the bug and haven’t stopped making quilts since then.

    —Bev on July 25, 2018
  • No I don’t have a connection to quilters in the past, that I know of 🙁

    —Marg on July 25, 2018
  • My grandma’s both quilted…and my aunt is an amazing current quilter!

    —stephanie box on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my grandmothers were quilters as well as my mom. My mom used to tell about her grandmother who came over from Germany hand pieced quilts. I even have a quilt top that was hand pieced by my grandmother and great grandmother. My paternal grandmother hand quilted quilts for pay. She charged people by how many spools of thread she used. Her hand quilting is amazing!

    —Freda on July 25, 2018
  • I definitely have a connection to past quilters. My grandmother and great-grandmother were quilters. My family has several quilts made by them: a few with what looks like Civil War era fabric (quite a few are very similar to some of the reproduction fabric I have in my stash!) and a few from the 20s-30s. All were hand pieced and quilted.

    I remember my grandmother sewing stuffed hexagon squares to make a quilt–which I still have today! She used to get fabric samples in the mail and would let me play with them to make little "blankets" for my Barbie dolls.

    —Jennifer C on July 25, 2018
  • My Dad’s mother lived with us for a while before she died and she made utility quilts from our old clothes. I always loved to lay on the quilt and point out the pieces as the clothes we had worn. They were not pretty, but we loved them. She would recover quilts that wore out rather than buy new batting. I wish I had one of those old quilts, but they didn’t last.

    My Mom’s mother made pretty quilts with new fabrics. She would make clothes for us and use the scraps. She would actually buy fabrics that went with what she had. I do have a couple of her quilts. Both grandmothers raised their children during the depression so they learned to take care of what they had. I make tons of quilts for my grandkids to enjoy and I love the fact that I can buy pretty fabrics for them.

    I love the fact that there is a history with quilts. I hope it is carried on for several generations.

    I love the quilts in this book. I love that she includes some history of the women in her books.

    —Phyllis K Menefee on July 25, 2018
  • I love, love, love the excerpts from the book. You have inspired me to get courage to start stitching again and immerse myself in my love of quilting just as my ancestors made their difficult decision to leave the homeland and cross the Atlantic Ocean to a new land. Perhaps, I’ll find my grandmother’s quilting story along the way. In my quest to ‘find my roots’, recently a cousin sent me a picture of my grandparent’s log cabin in North Dakota. Their journey began in northern Ireland where they left to live in Canada, settling in southern Ontario. As names were added to the family tree, suddenly the children’s births were in the U.S.! I imagined they must have traveled by boat in the Great Lakes when in reality, they made the journey by horse and wagon! Eventually, leaving the states and settling in Saskatchewan.

    —Barbara J Kellard on July 25, 2018
  • My first – and immediate- answer would be that unfortunately I do not have any connection to past quilters…. but being a quiltmaker myself and making quilts is what connects me to many past quilters… so yes, I do have a connection to many past quiltmaker 🙂

    David Bégué on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made many quilts– not for show, but to use until they fell apart.

    —Cindy Fraher on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother and great aunt were both quilt makers. They used whatever fabric they had on hand to make quilts. They are both gone and I cherish the quilts from them. My mother was a part-time quilter. I have several quilts that she made and cherish those, too.

    —Sheree Brown on July 25, 2018
  • I absolutely do…..I spent much time with both of my Grandmothers and the one taught me how to sew and crochet and the other liked to do various crafts and crochet too….but she told me stories about the old things she had and gave them value and instilled in me a love of old things and the stories that go with them. Things I have to this day and still love!

    Sheri Lesh on July 25, 2018
  • Like most quilters we might have a quilt or two handed down from a grandparent or loved one. I have two such quilts and I remember sleeping under them which lead to my love of quilt making. I have since passed them down to my daughter who loves them as well, worn fabric and all.

    —Karen Hutchings on July 25, 2018
  • Oh! Yes! My 4 brothers and I cherish the detailed hand pieced quilts out great-great grandmother made for us. She was a prolific quilter and passed down her love of quilting to my great grandmother, my grandma and to me! What a treasure!

    —Vivian Fitzpatrick on July 25, 2018
  • I dont think so, but I love it all very much. Really into history.

    —Sunnie on July 25, 2018
  • Unfortunately I don’t but having tried my hand at quilting I have a huge appreciation for the hand quilters of the past.

    —LizF on July 25, 2018
  • I love small quilts! I hate to throw small pieces of fabric in the trash because they represent bigger quilts that I have made for family, fiends and charity. They represent my whole quilting journey!

    —Rynetta Coetzee on July 25, 2018
  • Although they did not last over 200 years, while doing our family genealogy, I found my g-g-grandfather’s will. In it, one of the items listed, were several quilts. It was inspiring because, from the start, I always hand cut, pieced and quilted my quilts, wanting to do them the way that my g-g-grandmother might have done them. Nice to know that she really did that. Although I do some by machine quilting now, I still do them by hand when they’re mini’s.

    —Gillian Romain on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother was my inspiration and teacher of all things handmade.
    I can still feel her love when I wrap myself in one of her quilts.

    —Jeannette on July 25, 2018
  • Yes, but it was only after I’d started my quilt journey that the older generation of quilters came out of the woodwork. I have quilts from three aunts, and memories of that generation telling me of the utility quilts made by both grandmothers. The quilts and the grandmothers are long gone, but the memories are carried on.

    —Carole S. on July 25, 2018
  • Both my grandmothers were Quilters, but both had passed before I became interested. 😢

    —Nyla-Jean on July 25, 2018
  • Yes, my grandmother hand pieced, quilted log cabin, crazy quilts, bow tie quilts with the fabrics she had. They are primitive. I love looking at these quilts.

    —carol on July 25, 2018
  • All of the little quilts in the book are so adorable! I am the first quilter in my family and I’m a bit envious of those that learned from their grandmother or mom.

    —Karen D Martin on July 25, 2018
  • My great grandmother was a quilter. Although I never met, her I saw some of her work,

    —Carol on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t have quilters in my family, but do have sewers and embroiderer. I hope I am starting a pastime that can be carried on by my daughter and granddaughters.

    —Judy R. on July 25, 2018
  • I will be the first of the connections to past quiltmakers. I hope my quilts are loved as much as I love making them.

    —Janice on July 25, 2018
  • I love the older style quilts and have made several quilts from potholder size to king size , and also made all the applique curtains in my house.I would love to receive your free quilt book. I also save all fabrics left over from a project ,and use them for small projects .

    —Karen Hawkins on July 25, 2018
  • I did not grow up with my grand mothers and my mom wasn’t a sewer so my love of the craft is a recent one. I do have some pieces of my great grandmothers crocheted pieces she made from tobacco twine which I cherish. I love to think about her sitting by the field working the twine!

    —Shannon Ragan on July 25, 2018
  • Our family has a long history of quilt makers. Great great grandmothers and every generation since – applique and piecing – traditional and crazy. My mom expressed her love of sewing in clothing – sewing a first place at the County Fair from feed sacks in the 1940’s. Her dad went all over the Marshalltown’ area to different feed stores to get enough of one matching print for her dress design. As a child, she made all of my Barbie clothes and eventually my wedding dress. Only when I started quilting in 1985, did she jump in and start making blocks for memory quilts – now we are teaching my sister-in-law and her twin to sew and quilt in their 50’s.

    —Susan M Putman on July 25, 2018
  • My aunt was the only other quilter in the family besides myself. The only quilt I have from her was an appliqued baby quilt from when my daughter was born. We do cherish it as a family heirloom and a connection to our past.

    —Patti Levine on July 25, 2018
  • Wish that I did, but sadly I have no family that ever did any quilting. My sister and I are the first in our family to try quilting. Would loved to win this lovely book.

    —SherryG on July 25, 2018
  • My maternal grandmother, my aunt, and (later in life) my mother were quilters. I have a well-worn cotton utilitarian crazy quilt that my grandmother made. I also have several of my mother’s quilts, including a cotton crazy quilt; in that quilt I can identify many of the scraps used. ‘Oh look, there’s my sister’s dress. That one was from a skirt I had. That one was from a doll dress my grandmother made for my doll.’ etc. etc. I love those crazy quilts the most. They weren’t the fancy velvet and silk crazy quilts of the Victorian era; these were made of cotton and had no embroidery on them. They were my first introduction to quilts.

    I also have some log cabin blocks made from 30’s and 40’s fabrics. My mother-in-law gave them to me. They were made by her mother- what a gift! Someday I will put them together and handquilt them.

    This looks like a great book!

    —Dottie MACOMBER on July 25, 2018
  • (Don’t we all have a connection to past quilters?) I have several quilters in my family, mostly our same generation, where we share and inspire each other. Thanks for the giveaway!

    —Lill on July 25, 2018
  • Quilting is my passion! Lately I have been looking for smaller projects. I have a lot of stash to use up. This book would be perfect to help with that. 😊

    —Beth Owen on July 25, 2018
  • My great grandmother and mother were/are avid quilters. My great grandmother used to sew quilts from grain sacks. My Meme also sewed quilts so heavy that you froze sleeping under them! I still have one in my cedar chest. Quilting is something that I do with my mom that I’ll always cherish.

    —Kate on July 25, 2018
  • I have quilts from my grandmother, aunt and mother. I love to continue the tradition.

    —Kathie L on July 25, 2018
  • Sadly I have no connection to past quilters – but I adore making small items such as mini-quilts and wall hangings with fabrics that appear to be from the past. My friends and relatives seem to love receiving my gifts from the heart – hopefully to keep forever.

    —Joy B on July 25, 2018
  • When I was a little girl, my mother would go to an old lady’s house to quilt. The lady had a huge quilting frame set up in her house and 10 or so ladies would sit around the frame and quilt whatever quilt was on the frame. I would walk from lady to lady to see which part they were each working on. When I got tired, I would crawl in under the frame and take a nap. I will never forget those days!

    —Linda Hulen on July 25, 2018
  • What a wonderful book….beautiful quilts! Just have to have it!
    Judi

    —Judi Rizzo on July 25, 2018
  • My connection to past quiltmakers – my mom and grandmother were quilters. I grew up in the country, and whenever the power went out (every thunder storm!), my mom would light an oil lamp, and we’d sit at the kitchen table, talk and quilt/sew! Favorite memory for me.

    —Yvonne A. on July 25, 2018
  • I love quilts from the past! I know I would love the book!

    —Susan on July 25, 2018
  • I usually do traditional quilts so I guess I do a little bit of history in my quilts.

    —beth d. on July 25, 2018
  • What a wealth of history on a bed. Each one with a tale to tell, love them all.

    —Donna :Belisle on July 25, 2018
  • Two of my most precious quilts are connected to the past. One is the first quilt I completed. My aunt gave me a stack of Dresden plates handstitched by my great grandmother who died in 1936. I set the blocks and finished it all by hand. The other is a beautiful applique her daughter my grandmother made. It has a few of her snuff stains on it.

    —Susan Reynolds on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my grandmothers pieced quilts. I don’t remember seeing them quilt but I have quilts from them.

    —Rose Haury on July 25, 2018
  • I am not aware of any past quilters in the family. I have begun making small quilts for table tops and other decorations around the house. The new book looks like something I would love. Thanks.

    —Cinda Thompson on July 25, 2018
  • My love of quilting began with my mother and grandmother. I have many quilts, crocheted items and embroideries made my their caring and talented hands. I am fortunate to have learn many creative skills from them.

    —Jean N. on July 25, 2018
  • I am the first quilter in my family. I was introduced to quilting by a good friend about 15 years ago. Now I am reintroducing her to the quilting world! I also hope to inspire the next generation! The book looks really inspiring. I would love to win it!

    —Lois on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t know of anyone in my family who quilted. I was in my fifties when I became interested in quilting.

    —MoeWest on July 25, 2018
  • Would love to have the new book. Love small quilts and vintage looking quilts. Her books are so inspiring.

    —Pat Mosley on July 25, 2018
  • I learned to quilt from my grandma. I would spend hours sitting with her hand piecing and then hand quilting the beautiful blocks. I still have 4 quilts I made with her, and I still hand quilt. She’s been gone for 5 years now, but she left me with a wonderful legacy.

    —Cindy Yearout on July 25, 2018
  • An aunt has a couple of quilts made by my grandmother, but I do not every remember her making a quilt. I remember my mother making a couple of tied quilts and I have two tops that she made that need quilted.

    —marlene on July 25, 2018
  • I have an appliqué butterfly quilt made by my mother of 30s prints on feedbacks and a very heavy crazy quilt from somewhere in my husband’s family made from men’s suit and coat fabrics. It keeps us cozy on those chilly spring nights at the cottage

    —Enid Chapman on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother quilted with ladies from her church for many years, and I have 4 of her precious works from the 1910’s and 1920’s. I would love a copy of this wonderfully inspiring book.

    —Kathy R on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother and mother quilted. My first quilting experience was a Grandmothers flower garden quilt. My Mom showed me how to cut templates out of cardboard and hand sew the pieces together. I will cherish those memories. My sister is also a quilter. My passion in quilting is reproduction era fabric and traditional blocks. I own all of Kathleens books, so I would love to win this. If not, I will be adding it to my collection by buying it.

    —Tonya Hartnell on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made utility quilts during the Great Depression

    —Carol on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made many scrap quilts from left overs from sewing. She was a seamstress. Her favorite patterns seemed to be Lady of the Lake. My mother also did some quilting. Quite often her own design such as Owl block or other ones of her own.

    —Peggy on July 25, 2018
  • Both my maternal great-grandmothers made quilts, as did my grandmother and great grandmother on my father’s side. I have an unfinished top made of shirtings which one of my great grandmothers made at the turn of the century. I have never gotten into making small quilts, but would love to start now.

    —Mary Lou on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made quilts from scraps from the garment factory where my aunt sewed. Unfortunately, I never was with her during the making process but am a recipient of one of her quilts.

    —Kathy A on July 25, 2018
  • My mother-in-law did a little quilting but I have many quilts that her mother made – she was a wonderful seamstress. My father-in-law’s mother did a little quilting. My mother did a lot of crocheting but not any quilting. My best friend Mary is the one who taught me to quilt by starting me out in paper piecing.

    —Ann West on July 25, 2018
  • All the women, from prior generations, of my family have been sewers.
    And my 3 sisters and I also do various types of hand and machine sewing. Quilts are my favorite. I believe I would like to do some small, hand sewn quilts now. Would love your book.

    —Louann Mefford on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother had a large quilting frame suspended from the ceiling over her dining room table. When she was quilting, it was at table level. When it was time for dinner, she would crank it up towards the ceiling. She made beautiful quilts!

    —Janie Summers on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made many beautiful quilts. She eventually gave one of her quilts to each of her grandchildren. I am thankful to have received the beautiful double wedding ring quilt.

    —Lisa on July 25, 2018
  • i would really love this book

    —pattie houk on July 25, 2018
  • My husband’s mother and grandmother were quilters. The quilts they made were for warmth. I love the scrappy beauty in them.

    —Mary Beth McKelvey on July 25, 2018
  • My interest in quilts came from my grandmother. She told stories about quilts that made them more than just blankets. This book brings many traditional patterns in miniature. Love it

    —Kathleen Garrison on July 25, 2018
  • My Mamaw was a quilter. I have 2 of her quilts that were given to me many years ago… Long before I really knew to appreciate them. They have been restored and are on display in my home. I love the old pioneer look of these quilts… I hope to be a winner.

    —Deborah L Bryant on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother, who was born in 1890, was quite a quilter and would meet each week with ladies from her church to work on their quilts. I have several of her wonderful, well-loved, precious pieces from the 1910’s and 20’s.

    —Kathy R on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t know that any of my ancestors were quilters. Although out of necessity, I am sure they made some type of quilts to keep their large families warm in those cold Wisconsin winters. This book of small quilts is so appealing to me as I grow older and can no longer cope with the bulk of large quilts.

    —Joan H on July 25, 2018
  • No quilters in my family that I know of, but plenty of seamstresses, creators of beautiful needlework and crocheted and knitted items.

    —Carol Vickers on July 25, 2018
  • Love the sizes and patterns in these quilts. I love reading the comments of how quilts have touched the lives of so many.

    —Ann Schafer on July 25, 2018
  • My connection to the past starts with my mother who was a phenomenal quilter and instilled the passion in me. I only wish that I had her sense of color, as it too was amazing.

    —Kathy on July 25, 2018
  • My only connection to a past quilter is a baby quilt given to my husband and passed down to my daughter.

    —Renata on July 25, 2018
  • I do not have any connection to quilting. My mother or in law never quilted. I just started after retirement. So any books or ideas or most welcome to help me.

    —Linda Simpson on July 25, 2018
  • I have several of my grandmother’s quilt tops made in the 50s and 60s and some older fabric and blocks. I remember the cleaned and folded feed sacks on her couch. I’ve even had to remove old parts of blocks that were made of rayon garments that are shredding. I love the looks of these small projects, and totally appreciate the history!

    —Sharon Schipper on July 25, 2018
  • I have one quilt made by my paternal Grandmother. It is very scrappy with fabrics that include pieces from what seems to be a drape of the 50’s along with simple gingham and probably apron scraps.
    Although I never saw her making quilts it’s a connection I cherish.
    Thanks for the chance to win.

    —Catherine Denney on July 25, 2018
  • My connection to a past quiltmaker is to my maternal grandmother who was a quilter. I can remember the frame hanging from the ceiling in her dining room. I loved going through her cedar chest and looking at the patterns on the batting wrappers. I love the old traditional patterns in reproduction fabrics. Would love to win this book! Thank you for your give-away.

    —Dottie A on July 25, 2018
  • I the first in my family to quilt,I took a class in1975. My mom always sewed,but I got her into quiltingand we haven’t stopped! I love Kathleen Tracy’s books! Love the quilts, but I also read evrery word.i was suppose to live in the olden days.

    —Sharon on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother was Polish/Austrian. My mother would tell me stories of her hand work..she said that’s where I get it from.

    —Jane Blazer on July 25, 2018
  • What a magnificent way to honor those women of the past. I have just recently become attracted to the history of quilts. I would love to make a small quilt once a month as illustrated. Thank you for your work in the history of the past.

    —Sheila Wagner on July 25, 2018
  • It’s funny…I don’t have quilt making in my family past but I do have sewing and smocking that my grandma used to do. I velieve I might be the quilter to maybe pass on to my kids. At least they will have plenty to treasure once I am gone!

    —Paula Steingas on July 25, 2018
  • My Great Aunt Jo was a quilter. She and Uncle Jim raised my father on their farm in IL. Unfortunately, she died about a month before my birth, so I never got to know her. I do have a couple of her quilt tops that she and my father worked on in the evening hours.

    —Janet T on July 25, 2018
  • What a great looking book! The quilts are gorgeous! Need to have it!

    Lacy Spurgeon on July 25, 2018
  • No, I don’t, but I would love to win this book.

    —Sharon on July 25, 2018
  • my mother was a quilter, hand sewn only; my grandmother and grandfather both quilted, again by hand; and now i quilt every day,machine quilting only. i wasn’t interested at all in hand quilting and then i went to my first quilt show and discovered machine quilting. the rest is my obsession.

    —carolyn montgomery on July 25, 2018
  • I have a memory of both of my grandmothers as quilters. One just used whatever scraps from old clothing she could gather to sew together and the other bought whole pieces of cloth to cut down into applique flowers. She used old milk jugs for her applique templates 😉 Cool and resourceful she was!

    Anita Jackson on July 25, 2018
  • I have no connection to the past but love the book!

    —Louise Haddon on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my grandmothers made quilts purely out of necessity to keep warm in unheated homes. My grandmother had a frame she pulled down from the ceiling to see her quilts . Those memories caused me to learn to make patchwork quilts when I was 15 and have continued to the present ( now 59 ) my daughters are quilters and now my granddaughters are learning this beautiful craft.

    —Donna on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother quilted and shared with me as a young girl her beautiful skills that has given me a lifetime journey of joy!

    —Karyn Meyreles on July 25, 2018
  • My Grandmother was a quilter. She made quilt tops into her early 90’s. I was able to finish several of these tops and gift them to my brothers and sisters. I love touching her work.

    —Joanne L Wilson on July 25, 2018
  • I’m sorry but I don’t have a connection to quilters of the past, but I hope, that future quilters will enjoy my humble little quilts. I love making small quilts and have enjoyed all of Kathy’s books. This one looks extra special.

    —Judith Hogan on July 25, 2018
  • I have always admired the perseverance and ingenuity of the prairie women. I am not aware of any ancestors in my family that quilted and I struggle to complete everything I start!

    —Beth Mills on July 25, 2018
  • No quilting that I’m aware of, but I remember my great-grandmother making clothes. I have a wonderful gingham apron from her embellished with chicken scratch embroidery.

    —Cathy B. on July 25, 2018
  • I’ve always had a love for sewing. I was adopted and 5 years ago found my biological mother. Actually her family. She had passed away 1 year before. She loved sewing. Her sister also did and loves quilting! In fact I’m off to visit her in British Columbia tomorrow!
    So quilting is in my blood 🙂

    —anne ventresco on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother was a quilter. I have a lovely crazy quilt that was made by her that will be passed to my granddaughter when she marries. It’s a wonderful family tradition that I’m proud to be a part of.

    —Linda B. on July 25, 2018
  • Looks like a great book. My connection to a quilter of the past was my beautiful grandmother. She was such an inspiration. Since she passed I have had several members of my guilt kind of helped me when needed.

    —Sue Goodin on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother, born in 1898, learned quilting from her older sisters since their mother was a busy midwife. My mother quilted early but didn’t seriously till her children were older, and I have followed her path.

    —Betty nelson on July 25, 2018
  • I am lucky to have quilts made by my Grandmothers. It is so interesting to learn about old quilts and quilt history. What great books offered and her story she tells. I will have to get at least one of those. Thanks for the offer!

    —Pam Blake on July 25, 2018
  • I have no connection with past quilters. But I love to read about (old) quilts and their history

    —A. on July 25, 2018
  • Unfortunately, I don’t have any remembrance of older quilts growing up but it wasn’t until I had my own children did I become acquainted. I have a very dear friend who was making a quilt for each of her three daughters for Christmas one year. Nothing elaborate just squares sewn together and tied to keep the layers of squares, batting and backing together. I was so intrigued that I made a quilt for each of my two boys. Then a few years later I started getting into appliqued. My friend who had intrigued me with her quilts couldn’t believe how far I had come with my quilting experiences.

    —Diane Baldwin on July 25, 2018
  • My mother ( and as far as I remember my grandmother) never quilted, but they sewed clothing especially when they could not find an item they liked. I now make quilts and enjoy trying to finish in order to enter one or another challenge..

    —Karen on July 25, 2018
  • Sadly, both of my grandmothers died before I was born. My dad told me that no one quilted, well, they didn’t make anything fancy, just to stay warm. I guess we all have different definitions of a quilt. I had to learn by trial and error in the mid seventies. I have nothing from the past. Mine will be the oldest quilts my family has.

    —Judy Maggio on July 25, 2018
  • My mom and older sister are both quilters. This shared love has made our family bond even stronger. Love these little quilts which are great projects for people like me who work full time but still want to have some finishes.

    —Becky on July 25, 2018
  • I have a quilt that my mother’s grandmother began for her when she was small. My mother’s mother finally finished it for her 35 years later. I recognized the fabric in one of the blocks that my grandmother added with fabric from a skirt that she had made for me.

    —Karen on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother quilted and I loved to watch her take bits of fabric and make something beautiful out of it.

    —Rebecca Wright on July 25, 2018
  • I am the first in the family to quilt, though my mother was a great smocker. So to put these matters right, I am teaching my grand daughter to quilt, she has started off with a rug mug, perhaps a small quilt as shown in this promo would be a good project for her, they are certainly inspirational and would be a lovely Birthday present for her 14th birthday in a months time.i

    —Liz Tanner on July 25, 2018
  • I have no quilts in my past, but my mother loved to crochet, knit and sew. This is just the book I need to use my collection of 1800’s fabrics.

    —Linda on July 25, 2018
  • I have no connection to past quilt makers, but would love to explore quilting history. Once I tried a small quilt I found I enjoyed making them more than I thought I would.

    —Cindy on July 25, 2018
  • My husband’s grandmother quilted. He often worked the night shift and I was alone in our smal apartment. One night my husband’s sisters invited me to come to their home to watch a movie and sleepover. I slept under the beautiful, hand stitched, heavy velvet quilt made by their grandmother. It was amazing. I felt like I was nestled in the bosom of his family. Now I am a quilter and make quilts for the new babies in our family so they can sleep sweetly, wrapped in the embrace of their extended family.

    —Teresa W. on July 25, 2018
  • I remember the quilt on my great grandma’s bed was a scrappy Dresden plate and we would look for matching fabrics on it.

    —Debby T on July 25, 2018
  • My great grandmother was a quilter. She wasn’t famous. I grew up with a basket quilt she made. She passed away before quilting a goose in the pond quilt. When I learned to quilt, I finished it.

    —Nancy Conyers on July 25, 2018
  • My mother in law was a quilter. No one in my family quilted, but my grandmother taught me how to do embroidery stitches.

    —Lorna Reeser on July 25, 2018
  • Up to about 10 years ago, I had no connections to quilts except that I loved them and was terrified to make them. I love the colors and the patterns and it makes my heart happy just to sew each piece of the quilt together. I was blessed to have an 83 year old lady teach me how to quilt over a period of two years, a lady who painstakingly took the time and the effort to show me all the "old ways" and I’m still there. I love the traditional quilts and the simple "old techniques" that I have been taught. It does seem like one stitches their heart into each piece. For me it is a prayer for every stitch as I think about the person I am making it for. I still hand-quilt each quilt that I make.

    —Jen S on July 25, 2018
  • I love reproduction fabric and small quilts. This book has both. If I don’t win it, I’ll have to purchase it at some point.

    Cecile

    —CECILE EMOND on July 25, 2018
  • I treasure a quilt that was started by my great-grandmother (she made the top, piecing with feed sack fabrics), worked on by my grandmother (she made the border and saved the quilt top), and finished by my mother (she seemed the backing and stitched the final quilt all together). They have all passed on now, but whenever I feel lonely, worried or ill, I wrap up in the quilt and it feels just like a big hug from those women to me.

    —Kimberly L on July 25, 2018
  • My late aunt made one quilt in a sewing class she took in the late 50’s. That quilt is still in my sisters possession. She will not give it up. My family (except my mother) and my husbands family were not sewers. I am an avid quilter and would love to own this book,

    —Emily on July 25, 2018
  • I still have a little scrap quilt,someone made for my doll bed when I was about four years old. It’s quite ugly and I still love it ! Now I love civil war fabrics.I also have all of Kathleen’s books and would love to have this one too!

    —peggy kanz on July 25, 2018
  • I found a very old worn quilt in my aunt’s things after she passed. I’m thinking my grandmother or a relative made it.

    —Ann on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother and great-grandmother were quilters. I have quilts from both of them. I’m happy to carry on the tradition even if I’m using a machine instead of piecing and quilting by hand!

    —Virginia in AK on July 25, 2018
  • My Maternal Grandmother started the Quilt making,out of necessity probably and we have all followed along because we love making Quilts! Thank You for a great Book Giveaway!

    —LINDA Douglas on July 25, 2018
  • I love reproduction fabric and small quilts. This book has both. If I don’t win it, I’ll have to purchase it at some point. One of my grandmothers didn’t quilt, but the other one did. I never got to know her, she died before I was born. I do, however, remember some of the quilts she made on the beds in our house when I was a young girl. All perished in a fire. It would be nice to reproduce some of them. Mostly 9 patch.

    Cecile

    —CECILE EMOND on July 25, 2018
  • I have the Double Wedding Ring quilt my mother and grandmother hand pieced the summer before my parents’ wedding. I also have a Log Cabin quilt that a great aunt pieced at the same time. These are the only two quilts in my background. I began quilting in the late 70s after picking up a copy of Quilter’s Newsletter Magazine, and I can’t stop.

    —Lerlene Nevaril on July 25, 2018
  • I come from a family of craftsmen… carpenters, furniture makers, quilters, seamstresses, knitters, crocheters, and embroiderers. I have a few treasured pieces saved from my grandmas & my aunts. My siblings & I are doing our best to make sure our grandchildren learn to work with their hands and know the joy of making something with your hands.

    —Libby on July 25, 2018
  • My grandma was a quilter and the neighborhood expert on binding. She had a floor quilt frame which was nearly always in use, even though it took up most of her living room. I loved playing under the frame and felt so important threading the needles for the ladies who came quilting. Later on Grandma taught me the quilting stitch, and I was privileged to put a few stitches in her quilts.

    —Mary on July 25, 2018
  • This is my kind of book. I love little quilts, reproduction fabrics and reading history. I can’t wait to try some of these.

    —Nancy Angelo on July 25, 2018
  • My Grandma and Great Grandma were both quilters. I am fortunate enough to have one of my Great Grandma’s beautiful quilts. It inspires me everytime I look at it and makes me feel connected to her.

    —Christine E. on July 25, 2018
  • I wish I did. My mother did not sew. I do have a beautiful crazy quilt that my husband’s grandmother made for him when he was a boy. The velvet in it is rubbed bare from his little fingers! Unfortunately, I never met his grandmother.

    —Robyn Gronning on July 25, 2018
  • Not that I KNEW of when I started quilting. Many years after, my mom brought out a hand pieced quilt TOP, made by her grandmother, aunts, sisters…she remembered being less than 5 and not allowed to touch a needle. Mom is 85 now. I’m mixed on what to do…quilt it?

    —Melody Lutz on July 25, 2018
  • I am working with WV Quilters in their Quilt Documentation project. Our mission is to document pre 1970 quilts in the state. This month we did two 1850-1875 quilts that turned out were made by the wife of my 1st cousin 3x removed. It was great to see a piece of family history!

    —Jane Larke on July 25, 2018
  • I often went on vacations to my gramma’s in Park City. I think I was the only granddaughter that she taught to hand piece quilts. My stitches were way too large and my projects pretty ugly, but I loved the time I spent next two her, cutting out hexes for my Grandmother’s flower garden.

    Kathy Gruwell on July 25, 2018
  • My Mom started quilting later in her life. She is the only quilter I knew growing up.

    —Chris on July 25, 2018
  • My mother sewed quite a bit, but didn’t start quilting until
    later in her life. My sister and I both love and appreciate quilts.

    —laura mitchell on July 25, 2018
  • My one grandmother made some baby quilts. But I’m the active Quilter in the family. I’ve always been interested in quilts, and loved when I finally learned.

    —Joy Dickson on July 25, 2018
  • I am working with WV Quilters on their Quilt Documentation Project. Their mission is to document pre-1970 quilts. This month we documented two 1850-1875 quilts, that unknown to me at the time, turned out to be made by my 1st cousin 3x removed. It was great to see such a wonderful piece of family history!

    —Jane Larke on July 25, 2018
  • My maternal Grandmother quilted but I never met her, she died before I was born. My sister is 5 years older than me and she taught me how to quilt by hand. The rest I learned on my own, mostly from reading books. Nowadays I also use google, youtube and quilting forums.

    —Lori S on July 25, 2018
  • My mother and a few friends made quilts and then would get together in the winter to hand quilt them. I remember sitting under the quilt frame while they stitched and talked.

    —Jan Turner on July 25, 2018
  • I have a Sunbonnet Sue quilt my grandmother made for me in the forties. It is wonderful.

    —Marilynn on July 25, 2018
  • I love small quilts and those that tell a story. My sister and I are the quilters in the family and will leave our collection to those that love quilts too.

    —Sandra Rosier on July 25, 2018
  • I have one quilt from my grandmother and a few from my husband’s family

    —Joel Sellers on July 25, 2018
  • At the moment, I am intrigued by a 300 year-old quilt?coverlet that is in the Quilters Guild of the UK collection which will be on Display at the UK Festival Of Quilts.
    The 1718 Coverlet was made by ‘E.H’ – but nothing else is known. What were her thoughts as she stitched? Did she agonise over bits that didn’t quite fit the way she wanted.
    Lots to think about, and no certanties to close off the avenues my thoughts take me.

    —GloryB on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother was a quilter and taught me to sew. I feel her influence when I quilt.

    —Pat Terry on July 25, 2018
  • Unfortunately I have no ancestors who were quilters but my mom is terrific at sewing and always makes all of her curtains. I have started may quilted projects and completed a few!

    —Beth Mills on July 25, 2018
  • I am really the first one in my family to quilt. Many of the quilts I have made for my children and grandchildren have been for special events – graduations, weddings, birth of a grandchild. I hope that someday my children will be able to tell the story behind the quilts I made for them. I love the stories behind quilts and especially from the woman who made them during times of struggle in their lives.

    —Patty Fallon on July 25, 2018
  • My Grandmother and Great Grandmother were quilters. Mother was an exceptional seamstress but didn’t quilt. She made clothes for all 5 of her children but her love was making one of a kind dolls. However, she blessed me with all her scraps and I have a quilt made with scraps from my childhood. I would like to follow along with your challenge of making one of each quilt through the year.

    —MaryAnn on July 25, 2018
  • I have the one quilt my grandmother and mom pieced and hand tied together before my grandmother passed away. As they were tying it together, they were pointing out the different fabrics and remembering which dress it came from. I love quilt history and how it brought and brings out all our resourcefulness with what bits we have on hand.

    —carol mandel on July 25, 2018
  • I have the wedding ring quilt my great grandmother made for my mother.

    —Dixie on July 25, 2018
  • I like the connection to the past in this book. It is so true that going through my scrap bin revives memories of th projects that were created and the reason for them. I can’t say that I have ever sewed hate into a quilt…frustration maybe.

    —Cheryl Buoni on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made several quilts, which i have a few made by her. I just love their scrappiness! They make me smile every time i look at them. I am grateful to my mother for passing them on to me when my children were young. They are flannel backed and were so cuddly and warm. My mother was teaching herself to quilt just before she passed away and i took up quilting to finish a project she was working on. I am sad that i did not take the time to learn with her then, what memories we could have had!
    Thanks for a chance to win A Prairie Journey. I just love Kathleen Tracy.
    Carmen

    —Carmen Montmarquet on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t collect antique quilts, but I saw a tattered double wedding ring quilt at a sale, at the end of the day I went back and it was still there, I saw all that hand work ‘someone’ did and couldn’t let it go to be garbage by those who don’t understand the work. I bought it for $ 10.00 and appreciated the unknown make as I ‘saved the quilt’.

    —Jenny on July 25, 2018
  • As a young child in the 60’s, I would sit under my Mamaw’s quilting frame, watching her quilting needle go in and out of the quilt. She helped me hand-piece my first quilt, a nine-patch. That quilt is worn out, but I’d never let it go. I’ve made many quilts in the past 41 years, some fairly complicated, but it’s still my favorite. Mamaw’s stitches are in it, and it means so much to me. Thank you for the opportunity to win this lovely book.

    —Shelia Nelson on July 25, 2018
  • Love the book hope to win.

    —Judy Sanders on July 25, 2018
  • Very much so my gradmother and great grandmother were both quilters.

    —Janna on July 25, 2018
  • I had a "Bow-Tie" quilt on my bed as a teenager. I think my grandmother made it and I wish I still had it. I remember my grandmother doing a lot of crocheting of doilies and such. Love the idea of hanging the small quilts with clothespins! 🙂

    —Rose on July 25, 2018
  • I really like this type of quilting. I used to watch my grandma hand piece and quilt. I wish I had paid attention . Beautiful quilts within your book.

    —Sue Dickerson on July 25, 2018
  • I have a crazy quilt that was started by my grandmother and finished (the top) by my mother. It includes pieces of Grandma’s wedding dress and Granddad’s wedding vest and various fabrics from the 1890s through the 1920s. A local church group hand quilted a lovely celadon green satin back to a very thick wool batt and appliqued the top to that. We grew up having it on our bed when we were sick.

    —Elizabeth A Monahan on July 25, 2018
  • Sadly no.

    —Hildy on July 25, 2018
  • I have 3 quilts that my mother pieced in the 1930’s–one for my father, one for my aunt, and one for me. I am fortunate to have all 3 quilts in my possession now.

    —Beverly Kinney on July 25, 2018
  • I was first introduced to quilting and patchwork in the early 70’s not by a person but through Quilter’s Newsletter, American Patchwork and Quilting, Lady’s Circle specialty publications.

    There was no one in my family who quilted but my grandmother was a seamstress in Quebec, Canada where my mother was born.

    My cousin recently posted that my Aunt Rachel had made a quilt for her. My aunt passed away and my cousin still lives in Quebec.

    So in my family I am the quilter.

    —Carole Plourde on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t have a connection to past quilters. I’m the first in the family to take up quilt making and I’m passionate about it.

    —Frances Claassens on July 25, 2018
  • Not that I know of but I hope my quilting will inspire a family member to learn this beautiful craft.

    —Carol Gearey on July 25, 2018
  • I have always loved quilts, but no one I know made quilts; my mother was an awesome seamstress but never did quilts! Never even tried a quilt until I was in my 50’s and a friend said she would help me; she helped me get a panel and some fabric, and then moved so I was almost back to square one, but this time I went hunting for info so I didn’t have this fabric left over….and that is the start of a ‘very bad habit’ (sewing bags, quilts, wall hangings, etc). So now my kids have a piece of our family history behind them.

    —judys on July 25, 2018
  • My mother and mother-in-law were both quilters but the oldest quilt that I have was made by my mother’s aunt.

    —ANN R on July 25, 2018
  • I am fortunate to have several beautiful old quilts handed down from grandmothers and grmothers-in-law. Quilting for beauty, quilting by necessity-both are such connections to the past!

    —Becky Bynum on July 25, 2018
  • My Mom made one large quilt before she got married. Then two baby quilts before I was born. And a small quilt for my doll buggy. My Mother-in-law gave us two quilts for wedding presents and encouraged me when I started making quilts over thirty years ago. I would be so excited to win this book. Thank you for the chance. 😊

    —Sheila Fernkopf on July 25, 2018
  • I have no quilters in my background. My mother sewed all of my clothes when I was a child and she taught me to sew, but I do not ever remember her making a quilt. After she moved from Indiana to New York, she did many crafts but quilting was not one of them. I have just started quilting again and am loving it more than ever. I would have loved to share my quilting time with my mother but she died over 30 years ago, long before I got the quilting bug.

    —Angela Bowling on July 25, 2018
  • Have pieces of handwork from my mother-but have done none of my own.

    —Ann Parazin on July 25, 2018
  • I have quilts made by my grandmother, my mother and myself.
    I’m leaving them to my daughter to keep up the tradition.

    —Carolyn Stephens on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t collect antique quilts but my heart went out to a tattered hand made double wedding ring quilt, I thought about all the work ‘someone’ did to make that, and all those who ‘loved it to death’

    —Jenny on July 25, 2018
  • My Aunt and Grandmother made quilts…but I never
    got to sew with them.

    —Pauline on July 25, 2018
  • I love Kathleen ‘s patterns and would love to be the owner of her newest one.

    —Jayette on July 25, 2018
  • I am the first quilter in my family. My friend got me interested in it, and she makes beautiful quilts. Her work is something for me to aspire to!

    —Tina J on July 25, 2018
  • I have always felt like a odd duck in my family. My sister is a general contractor. My mother and father had their own business. Many women related in my life are professional business women. Me? I chose motherhood and quilting. Several years ago, a distant relative contacted my mother. She shared about my great great grandmother. We loved hearing all the stories. A few weeks later in the mail a package came. Inside a beautiful quilt! Made by the great great grandmother! How exciting! It’s in my genes!!!! I think of her often. I have that quilt in my home now. It is a special treasure.

    —Lorene Holbrook on July 25, 2018
  • I connect with my mother and her mother. My grandma always had a quilt on the frame. She made crib quilts for two of my children before she died, at age 95. I also feel a connection with the (unknown) quilters who made old quilts I have accumulated. Some are pretty tattered but I can’t give them up when I think about the person who put so much time and effort into them.

    —Margaret Hynes on July 25, 2018
  • No one in my family were quilters. they all knitted, crochet and sewed clothes. I love anything to do with history and old time quilts. When our son passed suddenly, a friend said I needed something to help with my grief.She was quilter and we took classes together. Quilting has been my therapy. I have 5 of Kathleen’s books and made several of her little quilts. Making these small quilts was a way of learning the different patterns. I would love to have Kathleen’s new book. Thank you for the giveaway.
    Carolyn B

    —Carolyn Boutilier on July 25, 2018
  • My Grandma Ruth taught me to quilt in 1974 when I was 18. I spent many years being a "mommy" so quilting got put aside to making clothes, but she always made time, so I have made sure that I still did something no matter how little. Now I’m retired and have so many ideas and projects started….Love you Grandma

    —Joni Giancola on July 25, 2018
  • I have no connection to the past. This book would help me with my stash of 1800’s fabric.

    —Linda on July 25, 2018
  • I have all of Kathleen Tracy’s books and can’t wait to get this one. I see and learn something new each time I read one. Very inspiring!

    —Louise Chowanski on July 25, 2018
  • I really don’t have any connections to quiltmakers. Sewing was just something I always loved – there is just something about working with fabric that touches my heart. My grandmother sewed – she made me dresses and she taught me to sew clothing. I can still remember the dresses she made me for first grade! I wish I had kept them.

    —Beth Brown on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t have a connection with quilters, but my mom and her sisters made over discarded clothing into new outfits for us children. Her creativity paired with practicality still amazes me.I started quilting a couple of years before she passed on, and she was SO proud of the small lap quilt I made for her. Even when she didn’t know her children’s names, she would point to that quilt, and say "Carol made that for me". Quilts made with love touch the heart.

    —Carol on July 25, 2018
  • Yes, I do have quilting connections in the past. I have quilts made by ancestors I never got to know as they are several generations back. However, I feel like I get some insight into the people they were through their quilts and the legacy of love they have blessed me with. I can only hope my future generations will treasure the quilts I am making that I hope will one day cover them in love.

    —Kristy on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother was an excellent needle artist, and my maternal grandmother supported her family as a widow in the early 1900s by doing needlework and sewing. With luck, I’ve inherited something from both women.
    I love Martingale books!

    —Jane Riewe on July 25, 2018
  • I do not have any connection that I know of to past Quilter’s although I wish I did!

    —Gail on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother died when my dad was 5, but she left a legacy of quilts to remember her. I still have those quits and she is often on my mind when I quilt.

    —Lena on July 25, 2018
  • Oh, I really wish I did! My mom made clothes for us when we were little, but never taught us to sew. I also found out, many years after she passed away, that my paternal grandmother was an amazing embroiderer…but we never saw any of her handwork nor did she ever mention it! I’d like to think my needlework skills are genetic and were passed down from her. My son’s girlfriend has briefly indicated she MIGHT be interested in learning to quilt…fingers crossed I can entice her!

    —Suzanne Kuhns on July 25, 2018
  • I just purchasd my first book from Kathleen Tracy and started making one of the quilts in there. Thank you for the opportunity to win her latest book!

    —Barbara Bagdonas on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother had a quilting phase before I was born. I never saw her sew, but I have a Sunbonnet Sue she made that I sleep under whenever I get lonely and somehow I feel a connection to home.

    —JennyH on July 25, 2018
  • I think my maternal grandmother was the first that I know of to quilt. Others I suppose were concerned with other things and didn’t pick up the craft. I treasure my cathedral window quilt made by my grandmother that includes pieces of both my clothes and hers, and a simple quilt I designed and started, and she finished for me. Such memories.

    —Laura Buckles on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmothers and my mother all quilted by hand. They are all gone now, but I also quilt and have taught my daughter. She made her first full size quilt by hand not long ago, and my mom lived long enough to see it. Quilts have always been treasures in our family, and they still are. I love them!

    —Linda on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother made each of her granddaughters a quilt with scraps from the clothes factory in the town she lived in Illinois. The ones I saw were all squares, all colours, and all tied in the corners with yarn. My yarn was red. I remember my mother letting me sleep under it when I went in high school. I married young out of school, and slept under the quilt for years. My husband and I were living in Germany and I still had my quilt. But,sleeping under it was not to be. It had been used quite a few years. I had the quilt draped over the back of my rocking chair, a present from my maternal grandmother. I do not have my quilt now. It was lost in our shipment back to the U.S.

    —Bonnie on July 25, 2018
  • There are a few quilts that were passed down from my Mothers side of the family but unfortunately the quilters are unknown. I make sure I label my quilts so they won’t be unknown in the future. I love the designs and fabrics you used in the quilts and am looking forward to making some of them for my future generations.

    —Pam Losely on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t think I have any past relatives that quilted, but I do have some that quilt now. I do enjoy reading about quilting from the past such as women that quilted when they would cross the country to build a new life. Sometimes they would use fabric given to the by friends. Or they would have a quilt with the names of friends and family that they left behind signed or sewn on a quilt.

    —Joy Meetis on July 25, 2018
  • Love the small quilts and the history they represent

    —Gladys Thompson on July 25, 2018
  • would love a book to start my collection and always looking for new ways to increase my knowleage. Hope I win !!!

    Mary Hansen on July 25, 2018
  • I have a tattered wedding ring quilt that my grandmother won in a drawing. She paid 10 cents for the ticket! Almost every part of it is worn. I tried to mend it but gave up as so much is damaged. However it still holds a special place in my heart.

    —Maureen Lefebvre on July 25, 2018
  • I am very interested in the history of quilts. The fabrics are breath taking.

    —Sandra Sanderson on July 25, 2018
  • I love making quilts from Kathleen’s books, and I, too, hail from Illinois, the prairie state. This latest book looks as fresh as all her others.

    —Cathy on July 25, 2018
  • All Kathleen Tracy’s books are wonderful.So many fabulous patterns.Love every thing about her books.

    Jean Ziessler on July 25, 2018
  • My sister and I are the first quilters in our family, but I feel a connection to all quilters, whether we’re related or not.

    —Molly on July 25, 2018
  • While my mother only made a few quilts, the ones she did are delightful. She sewed almost all our clothes as we grew up, so her fabric scraps bring smiles when I see them still in my stash.

    —Marcia on July 25, 2018
  • Would love to add this book to my other books by Kathleen Tracy. Like making small quilts as I know that I can get them done. Thanks for a new book.

    —Karleen Miller on July 25, 2018
  • My Grandmother, b. 1898, made many quilts, rugs, and all her own clothing as a young woman. I inherited her wedding quilt made by women in her community as a gift for her wedding. It was dated 1918 and there are signatures on it of the seamstresses who made it.

    —Laurie Banks-Montminy on July 25, 2018
  • Yes, my grandmother and especially her sister made a few quilts by hand as well as other things. Some I still have to this day and will always treasure.

    —Shelley on July 25, 2018
  • Love Kathleen Tracy’s books, patterns and stories. Kathleen started my newest obsession, small piecing and small quilts.

    —Connie J Carstens on July 25, 2018
  • Neither of my grandmother’s made quilts. They both did crocheting; one did fine lace work and the other made beautiful rag rugs in addition to sewing clothes, making stuffed toys and sewing doll clothes. I also had an aunt who knitted Afghans and my husband’s grandmother crocheted Afghans . My sister and I are the quilters in our family and we enjoy quilting together even though we live in different states.

    —Patti F on July 25, 2018
  • I have little connection to past quiltmakers in my family. I would love to learn more.

    —Jan on July 25, 2018
  • Sadly, I do not have a connection with past quilters.

    —Molly Riemann on July 25, 2018
  • I would love to be entered in the drawing!! My mother is my connection to past quilters. Her love for quilting came from her mother.

    —Melissa Williamson on July 25, 2018
  • Yes…grandmothers, mother and sister all did/do handwork and/or sewing. I think it’s in the genes!

    —Marlene S on July 25, 2018
  • My mother, great aunts and grandmother’s quilted. I have a couple of their quilts made in late 1800’s and early 1900’s…handmade and quilted. Also have a crazy quilt made in early 1900 from my husband’s family. Gorgeous keepsakes!!!

    —Marilyn Fite on July 25, 2018
  • Unfortunately, I don’t know if any of my relatives Quilted. My grandmother did other crafts, but I don’t believe she made quilts. I believe I got my love of sewing and crafting from her.

    —SHERI BENNETT on July 25, 2018
  • Yes I do have a connection to the past. I honor the quilt made by my great grandmother Martha Cassill. While we are unsure of the finish date, we do know she started it in 1863 while she was 13 years. Earlier this year I made a close miniature look alike. It was fun to imagine what her reaction to that would be.

    —Cynthia Wood on July 25, 2018
  • my great grandmother was a quilter and at 67 years old i am about to finish my 96th hand-quilted quilt. i think she would be proud of me following in her footsteps!

    —cathleen on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t know. My mother has a beautiful applique butterfly quilt that was possibly made by my great-grandmother but she passed before I really knew her and discovered my love of quilting and especially reproduction prints. I especially love the small quilts that are made in a short amount of time as I am still working full-time and quilting whenever I can!

    —Caryn Schipper on July 25, 2018
  • Various family members have been crafters e.g. knitting, dressmaking but I’m the first to quilt

    —Jayne P on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my grandmothers quilted & a maternal aunt! My mom loved to sew but never caught the quilting bug! Kathleen’s new book is lovely!

    —Mary Ellen Allenbaugh on July 25, 2018
  • No one in my family quilted or sewed, but my grandmother and one aunt crocheted. However, they lived hundreds of miles away so I never got the benefit of their expertise. Needle arts were learned on my own. I took up quilting in my late 50’s and haven’t looked back.

    —Sandy May on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother was a quilter – I have the quilts she made, including a quilt for me when I was a toddler. There are other, older, well-worn quilts that were stored in trunks in the family homestead that my great grandfather bought from his great aunt. (Great Grandfather was Abraham Lincoln Taylor, born on February 12, 1865.) There is even a beautiful crazy quilt made with velvet patches and lovely embroidery.

    —Judy Chastain on July 25, 2018
  • Yes! I have several quilts made by my maternal great grandmother and was taught to quilt by my grandmother.

    —Deb Stanish on July 25, 2018
  • My Mom made 2 quilts that my sister and I still cherish. I am new to quilting but have always loved fabric and sewing. Love the new little quilts and the stories behind them.

    —Cindy Berry on July 25, 2018
  • I still have the tiny doll quilt my maternal grandmother made for me so long ago. It occupies pride of place in my sewing room.

    —Marna Sorensen on July 25, 2018
  • When I was nine my great grandmother gave my father a blue and white quilt. I have loved quilts ever since.

    —Margaret Dalmer on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother was an Avis quilter. I never got to know her, but I did get to see a few of her quilts. She did amazing work. I can only aspire to be the wonderful hand pieces and hand quilter she was! Amazingly, I resemble her! I’m sure she’s with me sometimes when I’m doing hand work. ❤️

    —Sharon Ernst on July 25, 2018
  • I love small quilts but especially enjoy the history behind quilts of all sizes. I have a quilt made by my grandmother and also one made my my Mother-in-law’s mother. My sister makes outstanding quilts and has also made crib quilts for all her "grand" children.

    —Judith Toelle on July 25, 2018
  • My mother was a wonderful seamstress. She made clothing for friends & family members and also did a lot of home dec items such as curtains and pillows. She did make a few quilts and I have one of them. My grandmother did not sew but, taught me to embroider and she did a lot of crocheting.

    —Wendy on July 25, 2018
  • I come from a line of quilters on all sides. The most inspiring was my maternal grandmother , Claudia. She was a farm woman and belonged to a group of women who met monthly for a sewing club. I spent many days with her and other women knitting crocheting embroidering and sewing quilts. They met for over 50 years taking turns meeting at different houses and having a lunch.

    —Angie W on July 25, 2018
  • My mother, my aunts, grandmother and great grandmother all did beautiful quilting. I have some wonderful heirloom pieces!

    Elaine Jenson on July 25, 2018
  • This book’s subject made me think about my family–my Mom, my Grandmas my Aunts and how people came together to help others with their quilts. I have a twin sister and we’d ask my Mom to teach us to quilt; she would tell us when we visited her mother, Grandma Davis, to ask her. Grandma said she would show us how to do a "string quilt". Being a sassy teenager, I wanted to know "how you make a quilt with strings!" When Grandma showed us, she had a pile of fabrics and told us that these would be the "strings". Since it was on visit to Texas, we only got one block finished–Grandma made us do it by hand, no machine, so we ran out of time and never finished it, to my regret. But it is a great memory.

    —Judy Warren on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother was a wonderful quilter. She made each one of her granddaughters a quilt when they turned 16. Sadly, my appreciation of her talents was lacking and over the years it got lost in all my moves and downsizing. Now, every day I miss that quilt even though it wasn’t a treasure to me when I originally got it.

    —Lynn D'Arcy on July 25, 2018
  • Would love a copy of A Prairie Journey. My grandmother quilted as did her mother before her. I have always been intrigued by the lives of all our ancestors as they established their lives so long ago.

    —Pat on July 25, 2018
  • I have had a love for fabric, thread and yarn since I was a little girl. Using scraps of fabrics to make doll clothes. Now I make quilts, little ones, big one and in between. I don’t know if my grandmothers quilted but I like to think they did. My mother learned from someone and I learned from her.

    —Bea Lehman on July 25, 2018
  • Hey y’all! I do not know a lot about my family history, unfortunately, due to several circumstances I. However, my lovely Mother-in-law is a talented and giving quilter who taught me how to quilt a sew! I’ll super blessed!! Thank you kindly for posting about this book on Instagram, and hosting a giveaway. 😊🌻

    —Shannon Wallace on July 25, 2018
  • Not that I’m aware of but I know little of my ancestors. I do love historical quilts though and have always been drawn to the classic quilts designs like Dresden, Log Cabin, & Nine Patch just to name a few. I’m also a fanatic for mini quilts, so this book is perfect for me! :o)

    —Cheryl R. on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother pieced quilts and my mother only hand quilted quilts for other people.

    —BONITA M HARMS on July 25, 2018
  • I’m lucky 255th comment. I enjoy the gems we can see with these little bits of scraps and memories. Thanks Martingale and Kathleen for condensing them in this perfect book.

    Eileen Emerson on July 25, 2018
  • No and yes. My grandmother made a crazy quilt that she said I could have, but when she was moved out of her house into my aunt’s house, nobody knew where that quilt went. 🙁 I’m still sad about not getting it. And the other quilts she made were wool and corduroy, totally utilitarian, and they were used and worn out as I grew up. So nothing (that I know of) exists today of her quilts, and my other grandmother didn’t quilt. But I do love reproduction quilts: they are so warm and beautiful looking!! Great looking book too!! Thanks for the chance to win it.

    —Helen LeBrett on July 25, 2018
  • The first quilt I remember was made by my great Grandmother in the 1930’s, very scrappy appliqued flowers. I remember running my fingers on the stems and being fascinated by all the colors instead of napping. This instilled in me a life long love of quilts, especially scrappy ones.

    —Sue Cahill on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother must have quilted as I saw quilt blocks from her attic when they were cleaning it out. But I don’t recall her ever sewing on one. For some reason tho, I felt a "pull" to learn to quilt in my early 30’s and have quilted for the last 40+ years. Now I am teaching my 10-year-old granddaughter. She is about 2/3 done with her first large quilt and is so proud of herself (as am I)!

    —Kathy on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal Grandma used to quilt, but I was never able to learn quilting directly from her. She was a member of a grange and the women used to quilt together on Grandma’s quilting frame. I did learn to tat from a dear friend of my maternal Grandma. I’ve just started quilting and have completely finished one small nine patch quilt. I enjoy looking at all the beautiful small quilts shared on Kathleen’s facebook group. They have provided lots of inspiration to continue my quilting journey. Kathleen’s new book is lovely and I’d love, love, love journeying through it! Thank you for making it available in a giveaway!

    —Billie C. on July 25, 2018
  • I love quilts, quilting & history. Love stories & the meaning behind patterns. Would love to win a book 🤗

    —Joy Cunningham on July 25, 2018
  • No, I am the first quilter in the family.

    —Joyce Jose on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my Grandmothers quilted, one quilted tops for others and made quilts also. The other grandmother taught me and my sister to quilt as teenagers.

    —Joann Natarajan on July 25, 2018
  • My mom, 85, has two precious quilts that were made by her maternal grandmother in the early 1900’s. She made a quilt for each of her grandchildren (there were 10) and two for my Aunt Anna, who was named after her. My grandmother never quilted, nor did my Mom, until she retired about 20 years ago. Now, we are three generations of quilters strong — my Mom, my sister and me, and my daughter, who started quilting with my Mom when she was a little girl. I hope that one day her daughter (or son) will do the same with me!

    —Diana Steverson on July 25, 2018
  • I didn’t realize my grandmother quilted until she gave my mother a top she had made. Several years later my mom gave me that top because she said she would never finish it. Grandma had passed by then. I was so excited to get the top and I made it into a quilt. It is the first quilt I hand quilted, is one of my favorite quilts, and the closest thing I have to an heirloom.

    —Vicki Kilen on July 25, 2018
  • Such sweet projects! Oh, I’d love to make these and participate in that group! What fun! Certainly I have a heritage and antique quilts and coverlets that have been in our family for generations! My treasures!

    —Jacque Bruce on July 25, 2018
  • I love these quilts! I am the first quilter in my family. My hope is that my daughters & granddaughters will carry on the tradition.

    —Susan L. on July 25, 2018
  • I dont have a connection to past quilters but I grew up around a sewing machine as my mom was a seamstress for many years. I loved playing with her thread and fabrics because of all the colors. I think quilts inspire my artistic side and love of color. my love of color and art to combine my

    —Ellen A. on July 25, 2018
  • I didn’t grow up around quilting but my mom was a seamstress and I learned to love fabric from her. I think quilts became a way to combine my artistic side with my love of color.

    —Ellen A. on July 25, 2018
  • My great-grandmother and grandmother quilted all the time. They always had a quilt on the stand, and as a young girl, I would play under the quilt while they were quilting. My grandmother tried to teach me to quilt but I wasn’t interested at the time. I started when I was 40 as a way to occupy my mind as my Dad was dying from cancer. She was still alive and was so happy that I was finally interested. Quilting is in my blood now, and if I live to be 100, will never sew up all the fabric I have collected. I prefer Civil War fabric styles.

    —Kay U McAllister on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t have a family history of quilting, but I hope I am starting one.

    —Alice on July 25, 2018
  • I’m privileged to own quilts from my grandmother/great grandmother dated 1920 and 1940–and I didn’t even know they were quilters until I received them. How I would have loved to hear the stories behind their quilting!

    —Linda M on July 25, 2018
  • I love to quilt I wish I could find more time to make them.

    —Linda Duke on July 25, 2018
  • Not directly. My mother-in-law got me started and I’m so glad that she did. I’ve said many times that I believe quilting is the very best hobby. So many choices of patterns, fabric, colors, quilt designs and when you finish, you have a real labor of love.

    —Renee Welton on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made me a crib quilt using Sunbonnet Girl pattern. My aunt made my mother an extra large quilt using all the leftover materials from the dresses of her childhood. When Mom would talk about fabrics it was a like opening a door to her past. The stories would flow about the special event that led to the creation of the dress. It was the depression and clothing was often remade and nothing was wasted My sister found many quilt blocks in an old trunk. She divided them and made four quilts for her siblings. She was creative with borders and sassing to create king size quilts. I have been blessed to enjoy growing up with these labors of love and to still enjoy them in my home.

    —Patricia Johnson on July 25, 2018
  • Both my grandmothers and my Mother made quilts. Most of their quilts were used up keeping their families warm. I learned much from them.

    —Eleanor Kay Hunzinger on July 25, 2018
  • I am the first quilter in my family that I know of. But not the first sewer. Both of my grandmothers, one Italian and one German sewed, one out of necessity and one for embroidery and doll clothing, along with garments. My mom sewed for fun when I was young, and made my dress for chorus.
    I’ve recently taught my 35 yr old daughter how to sew and she is going to town. We started a small home based business and we attend our local Farmers Market to sell. I love fabrics and quilting. Thanks for the chance to win.

    —Kim Marie Quade on July 25, 2018
  • Not in my family but I’ve met so many in the past 30 years that I do feel a connection with quilt history. I call them the founding mothers. Some have passed but their work lives on.

    —Patricia Hersl on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t have any connection that I am aware of, but I’ve always had a love of handcrafted items. I have recently started teaching myself to quilt. I plann on making a wedding quilt for my daughter in the near future so wish me luck

    —Jane Wyatt on July 25, 2018
  • I learnt about quilts when my son was a baby as my Mum wanted him for a day a week on her own (first grandchild) so felt at a loss so a girlfriend said come and join her at a Church hall where they had a group making quilts. So pleased I joined in.:)

    Clare Campbell on July 25, 2018
  • No quilters in my family history that I know of. My mum taught me to knit and sew. I can remember using her sewing machine when I was 5 tears old, sewing dolls clothes.

    —Liz Sumner on July 25, 2018
  • none at all. my sewing role model was my grandma. she was a taylor and taught me sewing, crocheting, cross stitch, and knitting

    —heike on July 25, 2018
  • No quilters in the family; however, my grandfather was a dressmaker in New York’s Garment District and made beautiful dresses for department stores. My grandmother was also a seamstress in the garment industry as well.

    —Lisa C on July 25, 2018
  • Although I never saw my grandmothers quilting, I know they both did. My maternal grandmother was a tailor and my paternal grandmother made some wedding dresses. I have a couple quilt tops from either my grandmother or great grandmother as well a a quilt from my husband’s grandmother. I have always loved fabric and have many quilts planned…hoping to be able to see more regularly soon. Little quilts would be fun since I could get it finished and put it to use more timely.

    —Deborah B. on July 25, 2018
  • My mother and grandmother were raised on the farm and made utilitarian quilts, which were tied with yarn. I got my love of seeing from my mom, though and have always sewn clothes and home decor. I made my first quilt in 1976 but didn’t really get into quilting until the 90’s. I love making quilts, large and small, and especially love giving them as gifts.

    —Sally Hurst on July 25, 2018
  • As far as I know, I am the first quilter in my family. My mother’s mother taught me how to crochet, and I taught myself how to needlepoint and cross-stitch from kits.

    —Karen on July 25, 2018
  • My maternal grandmother quilted, as did my mother and favorite aunt. They did all their quilting by hand. Since I began to quilt later in life, I prefer to machine piece. Would love to win a copy of this new book. Makes me want to research more about my ancestors.

    —Katherine K Morvay on July 25, 2018
  • My mother’s mother gave me the quilt top she made along with her mother before her wedding day. She made patterns from newspapers and would tie a scrap of material around it as a reminder of what was made. My father’s mother taught me all about embroidery and handwork. I feel very blessed to have had them in my life to guide me. Would love to have this book, thanks for the give away!

    —Cheryl S on July 25, 2018
  • I remember seeing a beautiful crazy quilt from my father’s family that must have gotten shipped to another relative. I now am the owner of a rail fence quilt that is falling apart at the seams from my Grandmother’s side. I don’t know what happened to the crazy quilt. I feel inspired by Kathleen’s small quilt patterns so I’d like to sew along with this group.

    —Donna Hanson on July 25, 2018
  • I am the only one who has quilted in my family .But I had the opportunity to finish a quilt top that my grandmother had begun to embroider .It was a humbling and blessed experience to work on that quilt top knowing that my Grandmothers hands had worked on it as well.I did get it finished and gave it to mother on Mothers Day 3 years ago .It will be a family legacy and passed through the generations for many years to come .

    —Debi Thompson on July 25, 2018
  • I’m the first quilter in my family that I know about. My beloved grandmother was the first woman I knew who sewed and taught me to sew. She was an exquisite seamstress.

    —Geri on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my grandmothers quilted and did handwork. I still have many of the pieces I made along side them. Thanks for the give away!

    —Cheryl S on July 25, 2018
  • I am a self-taught quilter.Now my Grandmother, Virginia, was an awesome quiler. I have one of her quilts hanging in my sewing room. I adore it and run my hands over all her hand stitching and feel her hands. I wouldn’t give it up for all the money in the world!

    Please enter me.

    Thanks,

    June

    —June Vaughn on July 25, 2018
  • I have quilts made by my ancestors, although I don’t know all the history. I have made quilts for my parents, my in laws, my children, and grandchildren, so I am fostering their link to quilting history.

    —Tess McCarthy on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t know any quilters. I have taught myself by watching Craftsy and YouTube videos. I am on my third queen size quilt and have made two baby quilts for a great niece and a great nephew. I would love to have this book. Thank you.

    —Barbara Noel on July 25, 2018
  • No, when I was about to retire, I began thinking about trying something related to art, and that is it…

    —Cristina on July 25, 2018
  • A couple years ago I had the privilege to quilt and finish a Grandmothers flower garden quilt that had been pieced over 60 years ago by my Mother and grandmother.

    —Vickie A-M on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother hand quilted all her quilts I love theses little quilts just beautiful!!

    —Sandy on July 25, 2018
  • We HAVE to preserve our heritage…..
    They are taking art out of the schools??? What’s next??? There is no place for a child to express him or herself????
    Give them something to work on and be proud of it!!!!
    Goes are gardening too!! Nowdays the children sit around and push buttons and kill creatures….all violence …… and then parents reward them by taking them to a violent movie!!! Sorry, I’ll shutup now..
    I love the book!!!!! more than you know…

    —Theresa on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my grandmothers were quilters and did handwork. I still have things I made at their side. Thanks for the give away.

    —Cheryl Sedlar on July 25, 2018
  • My mother was a quilter but I don’t know about the generations before. I wish I did!! I love those stories that have been passed down through the generations!! I would love this book!!

    —Barbara Beernink on July 25, 2018
  • I have no past quilters in my immediate family but I do remember the Sunbonnet Sue that was on my bed when I visited a friend. She was my second grade teacher and her mother was the quilter.

    —Nancy Norris on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my grandmothers sewed. I’m the only granddaughter that took up and enjoyed the art. Thanks for the give away.

    —Cheryl D on July 25, 2018
  • I love the trip round the world quilt that my mother made for our inherited iron bedstead. I appreciate all the love she put into it.

    —Alcea Rosea on July 25, 2018
  • My connection to past quiltmaking was my dad’s mother (my grandmother). She used old clothing & sheets to make her quilts.

    —Glenda Hollander on July 25, 2018
  • My aunt was a quilter, my Mom and Grandmas were sewers. Ohh I’d love to win Kathleen’s book!

    —Shirley JB on July 25, 2018
  • No connection to quilters of the past other than the fact that I *am* a quilter. I am the first quilter in my family.

    —Michelle Bennett on July 25, 2018
  • Love, love, love this style. In the past I made a civil war quilt and thoroughly fell in love with the fabrics & style!

    —Lisa L on July 25, 2018
  • Unfortunately I don’t have a connection with quilters from my family members that lived before me. I did learn my love of all crafty from my grandmother who taught me to sew, embroider, and smock. I gravitated to quilting through friends who are still part of my life.

    —Amy Cofer on July 25, 2018
  • I have no family members who were quilters. I’m the 1st! I’m self taught. I starting using a sewing machine at age 8 and I have never stopped! ❤

    —Pam M on July 25, 2018
  • I am the first quilter in my family on my mother and father’s side both. I would have loved it if there had been someone to show me and teach me about quilting when I was young but I am grateful that I did learn even though it was later!! This book looks wonderful.

    Diane H. on July 25, 2018
  • I do! I remember, as a young child, visiting my mother’s relatives in Kansas, and one of her aunts had a quilt frame set up in the liing room. As I recall, it took up all the space. I was fascinated by the quilt frame and have kept that image in my mind for quite a few decades. Now I, too, am a quilter, those I do all of my work with the sewing machine. I would like to try quilting in a frame, tho, just for the connection to my childhood.

    —Margaret on July 25, 2018
  • I have been blessed with quilts made by my mother, grandmother, and great-grandmother. Some are over 100 years old. One of the quilts that I treasure the most, is one my grandmother made as a doll quilt for me. It is draped on my childhood rocking chair.

    —Nancy Lewis on July 25, 2018
  • I have always loved needlework, especially quilting. My grandfather took up quilting in his later years and I have that quilt, as well as a quilt that my mother made when she was very young. I would love a copy of this book.

    —Paula McCown on July 25, 2018
  • No, I have no connection to past quilters as far as I know.

    —Sharon Aurora on July 25, 2018
  • I don’t have a personal connection but a deep appreciation for quilts of the past!

    —Lee on July 25, 2018
  • My grandma who died when I was 5 had many quilt tops ready to be quilted when she passed. Sixty years ago quilting wasn’t an interest off my mom,so she gave them all away. We still have a few of grandma quilts- I wish I could talk and quilt with her. I’m sure she would have some interesting stories where the fabric came from

    —Linda Blundy on July 25, 2018
  • No quilters in my family ….I am the first one that I know of, but my maternal grandma made feather comforters or ones with wool inside.

    —Cynthia Fedak on July 25, 2018
  • I love historical quilts. I started with a log cabin. When I got experience I did a civil war one.

    —Martha cook on July 25, 2018
  • My love for quilting was handed down by my mother and grandmother. I am so glad that they shared their love for working with fabrics and making handmade gifts. I intend to do the same and hope that it stays in our family for many generations to come.

    —Karen Schultz on July 25, 2018
  • My mother-in-law quilted year long, as did her mil. My mother sewed but she hated quilting. Even so, I grew up with her mother’s quilts providing warmth on our beds. Tattered and worn out, I have many of them today. Today my sister Quilts, my niece Quilts, I Quilt, and my daughter buys fabric!

    —M. E. Worthen on July 25, 2018
  • Although no one in my family before me quilted, I come from women who were talented at sewing, knitting, etc. I feel connected to them-and to all women before me-when I can immerse myself fully in what I am DOING- and enjoy the process. I love Kathleen Tracy’s books and would like to add this to my collection.

    —jeannie on July 25, 2018
  • My maternal grandmother quilted, but it was long before my time. She died before I caught the quilting bug. I wish I would have been able to share my love of quilting with her and tapped her knowledge. I’d love to recreate one of her quilts!

    —Mary Hines on July 25, 2018
  • I am new to Kathleen ‘s work. Would love a copy of her book. Thanks

    Cheryl on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother taught me to quilt on a treadle machine. We would walk to the feed mill and pick out feedsacks, 25 cents a piece and we would make little quilts for my dolls

    —Roberta Moore on July 25, 2018
  • I have an old quilt that we think my great grandmother made but we’re not sure. No one else in my family quilts, I just fell in love with it on my own.

    —Sherrill Ash on July 25, 2018
  • I loved a Dresden flower quilt my grandmother made, I remember sleeping under it on the nights I got to spend at her house. I recently was able to sign up for a class to learn how to make one of my own, hopefully for my grandchildren to sleep under!

    —Liz on July 25, 2018
  • When closing the home my family had lived in for 65+ years, I found an old trunk of my grandmothers under the eaves with 3 pieced quilt tops all made from flour sacks. What an amazing treasure!

    —Pat on July 25, 2018
  • My mother , grandmother and great grandmother – all quilters! My great grandfather was a carpenter and made quilt frames for them. Thank you for the wonderful giveaway!

    —lee on July 25, 2018
  • I still have the sunbonnet sue quilt that my grandmother made me for my 13th birthday. The last time that I looked at it (which has been a while ago) you can still she had stitched each of the sunbonnets and tied the quilt together

    —Maria Allen on July 25, 2018
  • I have no connections to earlier quilters- my Mom had arthritis from an early age so she only mended things when needed- I don’t know why I always wanted to learn to quilt- but am glad I did and really enjoy it!!

    —Karen H on July 25, 2018
  • I guess you could say I learned to sew and quilt from my sister in the 90’s, she had a group of friends who would get together to learn new things and one month quilting was one of them!

    —Elaine Morgan on July 25, 2018
  • No quilters in my family.Someone else got me intrested in quilting.

    —Janet Flugum on July 25, 2018
  • My Mom taught me to sew, but I took a class at JoAnn’s to learn how to quilt in my 40’s. I discovered that my Great Grandmother quilted and I now have a couple of quilts she made. I even have a quilt top that she made back in the early 1900’s which I’m repairing and will quilt it. So special!

    —Ann L. on July 25, 2018
  • No connections. The book of small quilts looks lovely.

    —AS on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother quilted, beautifully. I still have and treasure one of hers.
    My mother did not quilt, she sewed, but her focus was fashion. I really treasure my grandmothers quilt, the binding is tattered now, if I replace it I intend to place some material on top of what is worn out.

    —stephanie Woodward on July 25, 2018
  • Doll patch quilts were my beginning projects. Hopefully, I’ve progressed since I was a kid! I want to win!

    —Nancy Pontious on July 25, 2018
  • I have tied quilts from my Great Grandmother,
    we all fight over them : )

    —elizabeth a hinze on July 25, 2018
  • As far as I know there aren’t any other quilters in my family so I am the first. I will soon be gaining two sweet daughter in laws so there is hope that maybe I can start a family connection.

    —Angelia L. on July 25, 2018
  • I wish that were the case but all my grandparents had already passed before I was born. I would have loved to have that connection

    —Nancy Chappelle on July 25, 2018
  • My grand parent had already passed before I was born. I wish I had been able to experience that connection.

    —Nancy Chappelle on July 25, 2018
  • MY GRANDMOTHER MADE ME A QUILT WHEN I WAS FOURTEEN FOR CHRISTMAS, It was all made out of her old aprons and dresses, the pattern in each block was a butterfly. About 8 yrs. ago I decided to make one just like she did only in blues and white. I drew up some templates of all the pieces that made the butterfly. It came out really nice. That was the first quilt I ever made and since then I been doing a lot of quilts for different ones and also for the Quilts of Valor for the veterans. I been wanting to make a quilt out of the civil war look material for some time now and I will when I get the time.

    Phyllis Kelso on July 25, 2018
  • I have one family quilt from a great aunt I never met who lived in North Dakota. It is a log cabin pattern that I used often as a child

    —Pamela Reim on July 25, 2018
  • My great grandmother created a beautiful hand quilted quilt in 1930. It was based on the Orange Peel pattern; she did it in a mint green and cream. It was in such excellent condition that our family donated it to the Nova Scotia Museum so that it would be protected and shared. Maybe I inherited my love of quilting from her.

    —Margaret Chernosky on July 25, 2018
  • Sadly quilters in my past. However, both my mother and grandmother were very wonderful sewers. My grandmothers gift to me was a love of embroidery, oh I wish I could do her satin stitch! My mother was a seamstress and made every dress through Kindergarten to prom for my 6 sisters and I. Oh, not to mention wedding dresses! I am grateful to have many of their sewing tools that I use on quilts!

    —Kathy Gaines on July 25, 2018
  • I have followed Kathleen and have all her other books…i have made several small quilts and adore each one

    —Suzanne Senglaub on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother and my great aunt were both quilters, but I learned about quilting from a dear friend after they both passed away. I love the history in quilts, there is so much to learn. I truly wish they could talk!

    —Kristen on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother made a baby quilt for each of her grandchildren. I still have my sibling’s and my baby quilts. They are all ragged. I watched my mom make a quilt for each of her grandkids who were born before she died. That is my legacy.

    —Susan on July 25, 2018
  • I’m the only one in my family, past, present, and for the foreseeable future, to make quilts. I guess I’m a sort of quilt pioneer myself.

    —Susan Mormile on July 25, 2018
  • Yes, I have quilters on my family tree. I’m the newest leaf.

    —Diana O on July 25, 2018
  • Yes, I have quilters on my family tree. I am the newest leaf.

    —Diana O on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother’s both quilted and taught me to sew when I was a little girl❤️

    —Lois Capper on July 25, 2018
  • No connection at all, I am the first quilter in my fammily and hope to inspire some other members.

    —Christiane HALLAERT on July 25, 2018
  • My grandmother on my maternal side and great grandmother quilted a lot. As did my mother. Love these little quilts also

    Gail Miller on July 25, 2018
  • When I was small, we used to stay warm in the back seat snuggled under a tufted quilt from great-grandma. Utility quilt, it was well used, and is no longer with us. I do have a couple of other quilts from her, in varying degrees of repair.

    —Stephanie on July 25, 2018
  • I saw a hexagon quilt as a child & instantly fell in love. It was mesmerizing

    —ELAINE GREGORY on July 25, 2018
  • I have several quilts made by my late husbands great grandmother. I cherish them and plan to pass them down to my daughter along with my love if quilting. We are carrying on his family’s quilting heritage.

    —Brenda Bova on July 25, 2018
  • Well my cousins grandmother did more quilt related things with me but I now have my own grandmothers treadle machine so I guess it’s a toss up. Quilting however is a self taught thing and may I say bless you to all the on-line education I have found over the last almost twenty years.

    —Tonie Peterson on July 25, 2018
  • Never had a chance to stitch with her, but my great-grandmother was a quilter, for utility. We had a tufted quilt to keep kids warm in the back seat, when I was small. And I have a couple of her quilts in varying states of repair. But I learned all this long after she was gone.

    —Stephanie on July 25, 2018
  • My great grandmother made utility quilts with old blankets inside and scraps of fabric sewn together, then tied. They functioned like quilts but honestly had no charm. She was so funny. She cared for her grandchildren including 3 very active boys. She bought lots of black towels and fabric to hide the dirt!

    —Susan on July 25, 2018
  • I have a quilt top made by my great grandmother- the double-T pattern. And when I helped care for my grandmother when she had dementia, she would watch me working on the Amish quilt top I was piecing. I’d love to make some little quilts from Kathy Tracy’s book! Quilting is creative and soothing at the same time.

    Dianne Carey on July 25, 2018
  • Love reproduction quilts and especially when some historical information is included in the book. Love Kathleen’s books.

    —Chris McClaskey on July 25, 2018
  • I do have a connection to past quilts and quilters. My sisters and I have lovely old quilts made mostly by unknown predecessors–but predecessors nonetheless.

    —Marla Harrison on July 25, 2018
  • Love reproduction quilts and especially when some historical information is included in the book. Love Kathleen’s books.

    —Chris McClaskey on July 25, 2018
  • Both of my grandma’s quilted and I have quilts made by them! I treasure my quilts.

    —Gloria on July 25, 2018
  • I have no knowledge of any quilters in my family. My first "quilt" was a little doll blanket that I sent away for as a small child. It was Beatrice Potter’s Peter Rabbit and oh how I loved it. When I had my own children in the ’70’s they had quilts made by the Mennonite community near by. That started my love affair with quilts.

    —Brenda C on July 25, 2018
  • Quilts are a part of our family history. Very blessed to own some of my grandmother’s made in 1933. Treasures! Thank you for the chance to get the new book.

    Jan on July 25, 2018
  • The only one that I can remember quilting in my family was a great aunt, her quilts were mostly tied off. I have recently retired and started trying to learn to quilt. I would love to win one of Kathleen’s books.

    —Vicke Crowder on July 25, 2018
  • My Grandmother knitted and did crochet but my mother didn’t do either and didn’t sew. I am the only one I know in my family who quilts.

    —Elizabeth Kuntz on July 25, 2018
  • Both my maternal and paternal grandmothers were quilters and I am fortunate to have some of their quilts . . . as well as their UFO’s to complete!

    —Diane on July 25, 2018
  • My late aunt was a quilter and inspired me to quilt. I have a love of antiques and the past. My style of quilting is using civil war reproduction material and small ones. I love how Kathleen displays her quilts using antiques. I would put this book to good use.

    —Cynthia Corbelli on July 25, 2018
  • As far as i know I am the first in my family to quilt….history being made for future generations.

    —suzanne keal on July 25, 2018
  • Would I love to receive "A Prairie Journey" to have for myself. I would find myself at a garage sale and see a antique fabric either in an apron or other scrap. I have to have it, no plan in sight until I get home and my mind travels along where to include it. Thank you Kathleen for your insight on your projects.

    Althea Klosterman on July 25, 2018
  • I am so interested in the older styled quilts and look forward to her book.

    —Shelley Kelley on July 25, 2018
  • I have two quilts that I inherited from an aunt. They are well warned or as I say well loved from years of use.

    Elr on July 25, 2018
  • My mother and I both quilt, but neither of my grandmothers quilted or sewed much, but I do have a great aunt, Aunt Sadie and she quilted and used old clothing and fabric from feed sacks. Aunt Sadie quilted from the 1930’s on. Fast forward to the 1970/80s and another great aunt was a quilter from this time period and she quilted with polyester double knit. Such a difference in fabrics and times. If I have quilters before that I am not sure, but hope to find out as I am working on my family history. I am the bridge and hope to keep the quilting going. Both of my daughters have each made a quilt and I hope that they will continue on.

    —Cathy J on July 25, 2018
  • Yes. My grandmother pieced wuilt tops. She rarely quilted them. A few months ago a new friend was able to long arm the two tops I had. I have had them as wedding gifts for forty years stored away. The tops are about 55 years old.

    —Ann Austin on July 25, 2018
  • I have no link to past quilts but I’ve been making quilts on and off since I was in grade school….oh so many years ago!!

    —Rochelle Summers on July 25, 2018
  • I have several antique quilts and several antique tops. I, also, have several Kathleen Tracy books and have made several small quilts from them.

    —Maureen Klebe on July 25, 2018
  • My Dad’s mom, my grandmother was quilter. My mom also is a quilter. Quilting is therapy for me. I don’t get to see as much as I like. I help a lot on the farm. Thanks for the chance.

    —T. Johnson on July 25, 2018
  • No, no connections to quilters, but Mom, grandmas and aunts did sew clothes, which I also do.

    —Maryellen McAuliffe on July 25, 2018
  • My earliest memories of quilting were my maternal grandmother piecing blocks by hand. She lived with us after my grandfather died when I was three. I learned to sew on a treadle machine when I was five by sewing squares together. I made my first tied quilt in my teens and the first quilt that I hand quilted was one of my grandmother’s tops. It is a variation of Trip Around the World pieced by hand in 2 inch squares. I hand quilted 1/4″ inside each square and thought I would never finish.

    —Debra Miller on July 25, 2018
  • My mother made many quilts,both simple and complicated. I aquire d my love of them from her

    —Nancy furniss on July 25, 2018
  • Both my Paternal Grandmother and Mother were quilters; however our order is a bit different than expected. Grandmother taught me and both Gram and I together taught Mom, but I think she made more quilts than Gram and I together…. so far! I’m hoping to sew at least half of my fabric into quilts before I join Mom and Gram in quilter’s Heaven. Oh, and I love this book.

    —Marianne from TN on July 25, 2018
  • My mother quilted. I can’t remember either of my grandmothers quilting. But I remember Mom and a group of ladies quilting together at the community center. I think the quilts belonged to (and were pieced by) the individual ladies, and they met together to do the quilting. Nowadays my group meets to make quilts from scratch and then we donate them to various people. (house fires, illness, etc)

    —Janet Gervin on July 25, 2018
  • Neither of my grandmothers made quilts but two of my great grandmothers did and I have something made by each of them.

    —Judith Martinez on July 25, 2018
  • As far as I know I am the first quilter in my family. If anyone before me made quilts it was never talked about and I have never seen any of them.

    —Judy on July 25, 2018
  • As far back as my grandmother could remember our people have been quilters. I’m 77 and she, of course, is gone now but I remember many conversations about family quilters.

    —Betty Jansen on July 25, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother was a quilter. she no longer quilted by the time I was born–probably gave it up after an accident caused her to lose an eye. She had plenty of quilts she had made, & I always got to choose one to sleep under when spending the night at her house.

    —Judy Forkner on July 26, 2018
  • I learned to sew on my grandmother’s treadle sewing machine. She was a quilter and would crochet and tat. She passed away when I was nine years old but I was determined to build on what she taught me in our few years together. I am a quilter and have followed Kathy Tracy for inspiration.
    Thank you for another book!

    —Karen in Ohio on July 26, 2018
  • My grandmother was always working on a quilt for someone. She inspired me by her creativity and her resourcefulness.

    —Janey Cook on July 26, 2018
  • None of my family quilted- but they were all very involved in needle arts- garment sewing, embroidery, crocheting and knitting- I grew up in a very creative environment.

    —Sue on July 26, 2018
  • When I was very small, my grandfather,who lived with us, made me a doll crib. It was cream & green and had spindles and I adored it. Then I received a present from my great grandmother…a little sunbonnet sue quilt, that perfectly fit the doll crib. I remember it to this day. The background was gray, and Sue was decked out in Great Grandma’s dress and apron scraps. I kept both of those items well into my adult years, passing them on to my little girls. Sadly they were taken from us in a flood, but they still live in my memories.I think my love for quilting began with that little quilt.

    —Sandra Edelmaier on July 26, 2018
  • My grandmother, who died the day I was born, was a quilter. I have a copy of her favorite quilt block, but none of her quilts. I am grandchild number 50 for her, so she had given up making a quilt for each grandbaby long before I came along.

    —Jean on July 26, 2018
  • My grandmother quilted, and made me abeautiful appliqued daffodil quilt when I was a child. She belonged to a "quilting ladies" group at her church, and they hand-q1uilted my quilt and many others. I think I am the only quilter in the family now. My grandmother also taught me to knit.

    —Janet G. on July 26, 2018
  • No one in my family quilted. My mother loved to see but never taught me. I discovered quilting when I lived in the remote far north of Canada.

    —Liz lawless on July 26, 2018
  • My connection with the past is mother, grandmother, and great grandmother. All were quilters and masters of many fiber and artistic endeavors.

    —Suebknitter on July 26, 2018
  • As a newer quilter, I have been able to connect with women in my community who have been quilting 50+ years. So much knowledge & love of quilting to share. I crave our weekly quilting get-together; so much fun!!

    —Elisabeth on July 26, 2018
  • My mother in law gave me the quilt top her grandmother had made when my m-i-l was a little girl (Sunbonnet Sue). Her grandmother was not able to quilt it before she passed away in the 1950s. I was given the quilt top as I was more likely to finish the it than the great granddaughters, my s-i-ls. I have worked on it some and hope to get it quilted this year.

    —Carmen B. on July 26, 2018
  • I have a quilt made by my grandmother with scraps from a clothing manufacturer where my aunts worked. The batting is actually a wool blanket my uncle had from his army days in WWII and the backing is made of old feed sacks turned wrong side out from a local feed and fertilizer plant nearby.

    —Diane on July 26, 2018
  • I still have the doll quilt my mother made for my Tiny Tears doll, when I was about 5 years old. It is a one patch made with pastel flannels. It is quite faded now since it is almost a true antique. I will cherish it always.

    My mother instilled in me my love of sewing, quilting and doing crafts. For that , I will always be thankful..

    —Charlotte Schindler on July 26, 2018
  • I have no connections to quilters from the past, but I love reading about them and other peoples experiences with them. Wish that I had quilters in my family.

    —Linda Ahn on July 26, 2018
  • My connections come in the forms of old quilts from my grandmother and patterns from my husband’s aunt. My grandmother’s quilt is in dire disrepair, but my mother remembered pieces of the quilt as being from clothing my grandmother had made for her. My husband’s aunt had leftover newspaper patterns from family quilting gatherings, as well as some of the leftover fabric that had been cut out. I am trying to repair the quilt for my mother, and I hope to incorporate the leftover fabric from my husband’s aunt into a project in the future.

    Susan on July 26, 2018
  • Mi iniciacion al patch se remonta a los años 90 de mano de mi genial profesora Cecilia Koppmann quien nos infundio su amor por él.En Argentina el patch es muy joven y recien ahora se extendió por todo el pais. Cuando tomo contacto con esta genial quilter y leo sus palabras es como que puso en su boca lo que yo sentia frente a mis retazos. Gracias Tracy por tus quilts, tus palabras y tu obra!!!!!!

    Translation: My initiation to patchwork dates back to the 90’s by the hand of my great teacher Cecilia Koppmann who instilled in us her love for quilts. In Argentina patchwork is very new and has now spread all over the country. When I get in touch with this great quilter and read her words it’s like she put in her mouth what I felt in my heart. Thank you Tracy for your quilts, your words and your work !!!

    silvia payer on July 26, 2018
  • As far as I know, I’m the first quiltmaker in our family. I love keeping up the tradition with small quilts. I’m a big fan of Civil War repros and Kathleen Tracy. My great-grandfather fought in the Civil War.

    —Sherry Bobak on July 26, 2018
  • None of the folks in my family did any quilting. I’ve just learned from taking classes and working on my own. But I love the older quilts, it’s amazing how accurate the blocks are constructed without a rotary cutter!

    —Susan Stanton on July 26, 2018
  • Unfortunately since I am the first quilter in my family, I don’t have any connection to past quiltmakers. I love small quilts and A Prairie Journey would be a fantastic addition to my collection. Thanks for the great giveaway!

    —Bonnie on July 26, 2018
  • I am the first quilter in my family on both sides.

    —Pauline Simpson on July 26, 2018
  • My maternal grandmother made me a beautiful Dresden Plate quilt when I was very young. I still love that quilt today even though it is quite tattered. I decided to replicate it as best I could, and now that is my favorite of all the quilts that I have made and the Dresden Plate is my favorite quilt design.

    —Sharon Browne on July 26, 2018
  • My mother was a quilter and I was just looking at her "Grandmother’s Flower Garden" that she did by hand the other day. I need to finish this. The top is done, just need to go over her work and make sure there are no discrepancies before I send to the longarmer. Mother would have loved to have seen this finished.💕

    Barb H. on July 26, 2018
  • We have a quilt from a great Aunt on my husbands side that we treasure, passed down to us from my m-i-l. It is special to us. I also enjoy programs and trunk shows about past quilters and historical/antique quilts.

    —Barbara B. on July 26, 2018
  • I inherited a few quilts from my great grandmother’s estate. I am in awe and appreciation that they were all hand quilted with tiny and consistent stitches. The fabrics are a bit stained from time, but the designs are beautiful. My favorite one is an Irish chain done it wedgewood blue and white, made about 1910. It was made by a relative who was very involved in the women’s suffrage movement and I am sure those colors were used deliberately to show her involvement in the cause.

    —Teri N on July 26, 2018
  • My grandmothers were quilters. When I graduated high school I got to pick a quilt that my paternal grandmother made. I chose a double wedding ring made with fabric from the 30’s. Years later in a conversation with my parents the subject of quilts came up & my dad said he wondered what happened to the double wedding quilt. I told him I had it & he said he helped cut some of the pieces in the quilt when he was a little boy. He said he didn’t know if Grandma used them or not but my bet is she did & if they might have been a little wonky she made them work. Makes that quilt that much more special to me.

    —Cathy on July 26, 2018
  • My Babci made a yo-yo quilt which I have that by now must be 60-75 years young. It’s soft coloring is pretty to look at, but it’s still awaiting some attention to be repaired.

    —Melanie Dumas on July 26, 2018
  • My Babci made a yo-yo quilt that by now must be 60-75 years young. It’s soft coloring is pretty to look at but the quilt needs some loving attention in the repair Dept.

    —Melanie Dumas on July 26, 2018
  • My cousin and I each have a quilt our great-grandmother made, but we do not know if she was an avid quilter. My mom and grandmother did not quilt, but I got started because my mother-in-law quilted.

    Kristin on July 26, 2018
  • I have a friendship quilt that has my Grandmother and her sister’s name in desperate blocks. Grandma was born in 1902. This quilt was made when she was in her late teens or early 20’s. It is a piece of treasure from the past. My mom is 86 and still quilting.

    —Charlotte Divers on July 26, 2018
  • I am the first person in the family to be a quilter. I had one grandma that did a lot of crochet but not one person that I know of quilted. 🙂 Thanks for the chance to win the book. I would get many hours of joy making some of the quilts!

    —Holly Nielson on July 26, 2018
  • My mom is a quilter!

    —Cathy on July 26, 2018
  • My mom tried a bit of quilting, but it wasn’t a big thing. She was too busy sewing clothes for six kids!

    My last living aunt on my father’s side had a quilt top that my grandmother had made, and we discussed it before she died so I thought I would end up with it. But we learned afterward, that she had given the top to a neighbor she liked. I’ve never even seen a picture of it.

    —Brenda on July 26, 2018
  • I have quilts that my maternal great-grandmother made and a few that my maternal grandmother made. I also have some my paternal grandmother made. Many of them are very simple and some show wear, others are ones that were only used on the "guest bed" or put away for special occasions. They are all precious to me.

    —Nancy on July 26, 2018
  • I don’t have any quilting ancestors that I know of. My mother sewed some clothes and curtains and helped teach me to sew. Hopefully I will inspire the generations after me!

    —Karen McMahon on July 26, 2018
  • I would tell past quiltmakers "thank you" for passing down such a beautiful skill and craft. The quilts in "A Prairie Journey" are breathtaking in their simplicity and beauty. I can only wish that I can turn out something that looks that good (and enjoy the process as it’s happening)!

    —Teri Gailey on July 26, 2018
  • My mother was a quilter and belonged to a church quilt group. I was the youngest child and while they were in school I got to go with my mother to go quilt and learned a lot from the ladies in the group. I loved,the patterns the colorful fabrics made.

    Jeanette Jensen on July 26, 2018
  • I started to quilt about 48 years ago. I am still quilting and love it now that I am retired. In the first 38 years it was on and off because life got busy with working full time and raising a family. I would love to win the book and work on some smaller projects. Thanks for the opportunity.

    —Karyn on July 26, 2018
  • My grandmother, mother and cousin are quilters. I remember the precious memories of making a quilt with my grandmother. I love the Aunt Sarah’s Scrap Baskets quilt.

    —Lana on July 26, 2018
  • My husband’s grandmother made quilts for each one of her grandchildren and great grandchildren before she passed. The quilts are treasured! I was introduced to the art of quilting by a friend and it’s been such a great outlet for creativity and also, stress. I love making quilts of all sizes for family and friends. Your display of quilts is awesome! Thanks for sharing your talent.

    —Terri on July 26, 2018
  • Unfortunately, no connection to past quilters, but my daughter will have a connection to me. 🙂

    —carmen mullins on July 26, 2018
  • Love all of Kathleen Tracy’s quilts. She has a real knack for combining colors. Love the simplicity of her designs and the do-ability of everything. I’ve read all her books and feel so inspired by her. Thanks for entering me in the drawing.

    —Carolyn Rector on July 26, 2018
  • I am the first one in my family to make quilts. My small quilts from Kathy’s books have all been very welcomed gifts among family and friends.

    —Carmel Lewis on July 26, 2018
  • My Great Aunt Alice was a fabulous quilter. She left a legacy of beautiful quilts with such tiny stitches.

    —Jeanine Peeks on July 26, 2018
  • I have 2 quilts my mother made and one of my first quilts that she helped guide me through when I sat with her as she was fighting cancer. I think of her each time I look at my Grandmothers Fan quilt that couldn’t have been done without her help. Thank you for the chance to win this beautiful book.

    —Patricia on July 26, 2018
  • Earlier this year I undertook the task of sorting through the homestead my parents called home. I was blessed with finding a variety of family linens, clothing items, fabric scraps and lace remnants. I stumbled on my mother’s wedding dress, still in the garment bag it was stored in. I found wedding dresses my grandmother made for each of her daughter’s, which are over 50 years old. In a box in a crawl space, I was delighted to find scraps of fabric from dresses my grandmother made for me as a child that I can point to in family pictures. In an old cedar chest I found original flour sacks, from the 20’s and 30’s. In a box of things my mother received after her own mother passed away I found samples of hand tatted lace, crocheted doilies and embroidered tea towels. I remember the tears my mother shed when she received these items because not one piece was whole or in very good shape. She closed the box and I didn’t see it again until I discovered it in the back of a basement closet. That memory is now 50 years old but when I opened the box, it was just like sitting in the kitchen at the Formica table and watching my mother open it. To my mother the items held only sadness. To me, they represent an opportunity to be incorporated into a family quilt representing over 100 years of our memories. The last treasure I found lay inside a dresser my grandmother had used. In the bottom drawer were a half dozen tattered, slightly moth eaten aprons she wore when I was a child.Inside a lingerie box, labeled "Dilly",in my grandmother’s beautiful Spencerian penmanship, were vintage hankies from my great grandmother. From my husband’s family I have vintage buttons and fabric from the 1930’s, remnants my mother in law used to make Raggedy Ann & Andy dolls. I have fabric pieces from the dresses my bridesmaids wore 28 yr ago along with a little lace used during our reception and not currently attached to the Christmas tree skirt, my husband and I made for our 1st married Christmas. Each of my children has a Christmas stocking with this same lace on it. What a smattering of small treasures I have at my disposal to work with.

    What wonderful discoveries, Susan – and it sounds like you were the perfect person to discover them. Thank you for sharing your story! –Jenny

    —Susan on July 26, 2018
  • I always wanted to learn to quilt but no one in my family did so there was no one to teach me. So have retiring I decided it was time I learned so when to my quilt shop and took lessons. Love making and gifting them. I am still in the learning process and loving it.

    —Sharon Lehman on July 26, 2018
  • My Nana’s and mum are knitter and sewers, I am to but I also love to quilt! 💖

    —Robyn on July 26, 2018
  • There are at lease three generations of quilters in my family. Both of my grandmothers were quilters. My maternal grandmother made me a quilt for my wedding. My mother is a very good quilter. She is 88 now and has made quilts for all her children and grandchildren, and she still has closets full of quilts she has made. I have six children and have made quilts for each of them as infants, made mostly on my mother’s singer featherweight.

    —Catherine Miklowski on July 26, 2018
  • My grandmother is a quilter!

    —Ashley on July 26, 2018
  • Both my grandmas made quilts and now I make quilts for my grandsons.

    —Donna U on July 26, 2018
  • I have 3 quilt blocks my Grandmother made from seed sacks. One of them I framed for our guest room. I have been quilting about 10 years and have made over 100 quilts.

    —Connie F on July 27, 2018
  • Unfortunately there were no quilters in my family before me. My mother did not like to sew at all, only did clothes mending when necessary. I love the old quilts.

    —Paulette Voit on July 27, 2018
  • I love the antique quilts and use the patterns in my quilts. I am first in a line, as my daughter is interested, I hope it continues.

    —Marianne on July 27, 2018
  • Both of my grandmothers made quilts and I have quilts made by each of them. I learned to sew at one grandmother’s house on Saturday mornings when I was younger. I have that sewing machine now, but it doesn’t work. I also have me other grandmother’s treadle machine, which does work.

    —Joye Cox on July 27, 2018
  • I have no connection to a quilter in my past. Neither of my grandmothers quilted, nor did my mom. I learned to quilt on my own. And now have 3 daughters who quilt and two granddaughters and 2 grandsons who like to quilt.

    —Cindy K on July 27, 2018
  • All the women in my family have been sewers so I guess they made a quilt or two through the years. I traced my family back to the 1600s in this country and they traveled from New England into the mid-Atlantic states so I imagine on the trail there was a need for quilts and they probably made them. I have several quilts I bought at yard sales and estate sales that I restored but I do not know their history.

    Debby Jensen on July 27, 2018
  • My maternal grandmother and an aunt who lived back the street from my house when I was young were both excellent quilters. My home town historical society has several very old quilts made by one of my great-great grandmothers displayed under glass. Plus, on my father’s side of the family, I have countless Amish ancestors, so I have a nice heritage of quilt-making to keep me warm!

    —S. Lynn Young on July 27, 2018
  • My mom’s sewing consisted of mending my farmer dad’s work clothes. My daughter did a nice job of piecing blocks for a quilt in FACS class in high school but has been too busy to finish it, so she has a UFO to complete someday. She enjoyed selecting fabrics and a pattern for her little girl’s quilt that I made. So I hope to pass my love of quilting down to her.

    —Jeanette Neibling on July 27, 2018
  • My Nana is a quilter and my Nan a seamstress. I come by my love of sewing honestly. I am so inspired by my Mum , aunts and Nanas.

    —Jo Barr on July 27, 2018
  • Yes, I have a heritage of quiltmaking, grandmothers, mother, even mother-in-law. I love what I see about the book! Would be so inspiring to have it!

    —Carol Koehn on July 27, 2018
  • my grandmother was a quilter. i have a few of her tops that i finished. i also have a red and white quilt with embroidery of bible stories that my great aunt made for my great grandmother in 1920. i used to sleep w/ this quilt when i was a child. it is a precious childhood memory and i’m thankful to have this quilt.

    —sheryl harrison on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother and great aunt were quilters and had a quilt frame to hand quilt the treasured heirloom quilts.

    —Rosalind Gutierrez on July 27, 2018
  • All the wonderful memories of lost ones and our connection with quilting bring us together today and yesterday.

    kathy on July 27, 2018
  • My grandma pieced utility quilts and my aunt appliqued and taught me Hawaiian Quilting.

    —Cheri on July 27, 2018
  • My mother and best friend gone now but always remembered with every stitch that we did together.

    kathy on July 27, 2018
  • My Great-grandmother quilted, then it skipped 2 generations. I was given the treasured Crazy Quilt she worked so hard on with her elegant stitches. There were taffetas, velvets, I’m sure, linings. By the time I got it, some of the fabrics were already disintegrating, but I loved it. I often think of all the hours put into a quilt then, with pre-worn fabrics, what they had, and used. Though I never met her, she inspired me.

    —Karen B. on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother quilted, and used real wool in them. One of her quilts was recovered, and was truly the best item of thriftiness and recycling that one can imagine. She had ten children, and I’m sure it was difficult to keep them all warm in the severe winters of southeastern Idaho. My mother was a beautiful hand quilter and gave so many quilts to her posterity. Also, she made several dozen utility quilts made from the polyester material we had so much of from the sixties and seventies. Her grandkids and great-grandkids use them to this day. They wash and wear like iron!

    —Laurel Lee Pedersen on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother taught me to sew on a singer pedal machine. I have a quilt we made together on it. The book looks lovely and is on my wish list.

    —Mary on July 27, 2018
  • Both my grandmothers quilted and I have a special memory of my maternal great grandmother sitting on the sofa hand piecing!

    —Rosalie on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother used to sew and do embroidery but no quilting. I am a first generation Quilter…and proud of it!😊

    —Tammy on July 27, 2018
  • I don’t have any real connection from the past to past quiltmakers. My mother was a knitter, but never really got into that. I learned to sew in school and sewed garments for many years. And, then I found quilting, and it became my passion. This book looks fantastic!

    —Donna W on July 27, 2018
  • I have no connection to a quilter in my past. My mom was sometimes sewing some cloth , that’s all . I learned to quilt on a quilt bee. And I like it very much

    —Rommy on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother, Nonnie, made some beautiful quilts in her day. I have one that I cherish. My mother did very little sewing, but I have been sewing since the beginning of my marriage, almost 60 years ago. I still love to piece and applique. I especially love to make small ones.

    —M Sue Smith on July 27, 2018
  • I have a scrap quilt my grandma gave to me, 50 years ago. I also have a filet crocheted bureau scarf, and the pattern with markings as she finished each row. Scarf and pattern are both framed. My memories and my inspirations!

    —Jacque Broadfoot on July 27, 2018
  • I was taught to see at 8 years old by my very patient paternal grandmother. She had quilts that were made by her mother and grandmother. Whenever I make or see a quilt, I am immediately transported to my grandmother’s house, feeling the heat of hot summer afternoons, hearing the whir of the sewing machine and feeling the love of my grandmother!!

    —Trish Probandt on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother made many, many quilts. Her quilts were not the beautiful, intricate quilts you see at shows but quilts made for the necessity of keeping warm usually made with whatever scrap fabrics she had. My grandfather made her a huge frame which hung from the ceiling in their basement den. I remember sleeping at their house under a pile of quilts and still use them today.

    —Cyndee Palmer on July 27, 2018
  • My mother started quilting in her 50’s and encouraged me do start as well since we both loved to sew.

    —Janet Dickson on July 27, 2018
  • Kathleen is my favorite author. She inspires me to sew using my reproduction fabrics. I love being connected to the history of women in our country through sewing.

    Lorene on July 27, 2018
  • I have a quilt my great-grandmother made using scraps from clothes she made for my mother. My grandchildren enjoy cuddling in it on their visits. It has been well loved.

    —B. A. Fellers on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother taught us to sew and quilt. She always used every scrap of fabric to make quilts for everyone she knew. Little House on the Prairie has always been my favorite books–these quilts remind me of those times!

    —Janna Lee on July 27, 2018
  • There were no quilters in my family that I know of. My mother taught me to sew by machine. She made many of the clothes for my sister and I. She also made costumes for a dance studio. This book by Jo Morton looks great!

    —Barbara Reifsnider on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother was a prolific quilter as well as embroidery and clothes and apron sewing. I have several of her quilts and treasure them greatly, especially when I find a scrap from one of her aprons/dresses sewn in the design. My mom is also a quilter but has not produced as many as my grandmother, probably due to working outside the home for several years. I love this legacy of creativeness and have followed in their footsteps.

    —Jeanne on July 27, 2018
  • Both my grandmothers were quilter, all by hand. They both had frames that hung from the ceiling. I loved to sit & watch my Grandmother Ferguson hand piece, she a,ways kept fabric, need,e & thread in her apron pocket. She also tatted, an amazing art. Now I Quilt & love each process of it

    —Victoria on July 27, 2018
  • My grandma made me a doll quilt that I still have today. Always loved that quilt,just something about it.

    —Linda Vaught on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother taught me how to hand quilt.

    —Judy B on July 27, 2018
  • No I do not. I wish I did.

    —Vicki Allen on July 27, 2018
  • My maternal grandmother was a master quilter. She made dozens for her nine children’s families. Sadly, we just used them until they wore out, but I’d give anything to have one of her quilts now.

    —Sharon on July 27, 2018
  • Just read the martingale article about Kathleen Tracy’s newest book after glancing through it at my local quilt store .
    I was so touched by the reality of the tears and memories we all make in our quilts and how rewarding it is to each and everyone of us! No quilters in my family that I know of sewers (hems / shorting sleeves) and embroidered pillowcases were deinetly done
    But nothing more.

    —Demetria Wians on July 27, 2018
  • Both of my grandmother’s quilted, as does my mom. I’m a late starter though, and busy making up for lost time. This book speaks to me on so many levels, I would love to add it to my bookshelf.

    —debby on July 27, 2018
  • I have a quilt top made by my great grandmother, who was a professional seamstress in the early 1900’s. It is made of silk scraps left over from dresses she had made. Inspiring for me.

    —Kathleen T on July 27, 2018
  • I watched my grandmother and aunts makes quilt and quilt them. It is one of the reasons I love quilts so much today.

    Martha Followill on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother and my mom made quilts to be used as blankets.
    I get my love of sewing from them.

    Joyce on July 27, 2018
  • My mother is an incredibly talented quilter. I hope to learn a great deal from her. Love this book! Thanks for the giveaways!

    —Linda on July 27, 2018
  • This book reminds me of "little house on the prairie", which reminds me of my daughter who loved those books and I’m sure would love a quilt made in that fashion. Thanks for the ideas.

    —Kathryn Smotryski on July 27, 2018
  • Small quilts are amazing!

    —Arlene on July 27, 2018
  • What delightful small quilts! I have only a few quilts from earlier generations in my family, but I have also purchased a few that "spoke" to me. I am very interested in the history and craft of earlier quilters. This book looks like such fun!

    —Glenna Denman on July 27, 2018
  • There is no one in my past that I’m aware of that were quiltmakers. So I am the first of my family. However my Mother was my inspiration in learning to sew as she made many of our clothes (some out of feedsacks!) as well as introduced embroidery to me as well.

    —Marie Eddins on July 27, 2018
  • There’s no connection at all in my family to quilters. We are mostly knitters and crocheters. I am a beginner quilter myself, starting with small projects. Love all the illustrations in this book. Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Virginia Bronner on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother quilted a lot. I love to sleep under one of her quilts. Just like her I like to handquilt :0)

    —Janet on July 27, 2018
  • My mom made two quilts all by hand in her later years and I cherish them. Now I’m in my later years and am trying to further the tradition.

    —Carol Bakaj on July 27, 2018
  • I don’t, but love the stories and history behind many that I have seen in other families I know.

    —Diane Koprowski-Pfeifer on July 27, 2018
  • My grandmother was a prolific quilter, she machine pieced tops and hand quilted them on a drop down frame that hung from the ceiling of her bedroom. She started me on the road to quilting with a simple nine-patch and I never looked back. Love the colors in your new book.

    —Norma on July 27, 2018
  • I have no connections to quilters of the past, but it is my passion and one of my granddaughters loves making quilts.

    —Noelene on July 27, 2018
  • absolutely I do! I tell people when the old woman in the family dies, after the family has taken all they want and dont know what to do with the rest of her stash, call me. I will find a home where her scraps will be loved and appreciated. I typically give about90 percent of it to charity quilt groups, and keep a little bit for myself. My favorite thing to do is find some old blocks and put them together. I feel like that quiltmaker can look down and know that I am having as much fun with her scraps, and it makes me feel good to complete something she didnt get around to, for whatever reason.

    —Madeline Wallace on July 27, 2018
  • I have no know quilters in my family, but I am passing my passion down to one of my granddaughters….I love those miniature quilts, love her story as well……Noelene

    —Noelene Winter on July 27, 2018
  • My grandma made me a quilt when I was a kid. I’m happy to say that I still have
    this treasure.

    —usairdoll on July 27, 2018
  • My paternal grandmother was a quilter. Oh how I wish I had been able to quilt with her. She didn’t pass away until I was about 10, but she had suffered several strokes and she wasn’t herself anymore. Lovely quilts.

    —Christine Wiseman on July 27, 2018
  • I love each of the quilts shown from A Prairie Journey. My mother didn’t quilt but we had a quilt from my grandmother on my father’s side and I was intrigued with it even though I was a little girl. I have no idea what happened to it from all those years ago, 65 or more years but I still remember it.

    —Marcia Lyman on July 27, 2018
  • I do not have a connection to past quilt makers. My grandmother crocheted and knitted. That’s where my first love was, in crocheting. Now it’s quilting!

    —Bridget on July 27, 2018
  • Both my grandmothers were quilters

    —Ola Norman on July 27, 2018
  • On my mother’s side of the family, there were a lot of quilters. I can remember my granny, mother, aunts, and great aunts making quilts. I have helped my mother with quilts when she was quilting them on the sewing machine.

    —Teresa Knittingdancer on July 27, 2018
  • For years I have collected old scraps and stitched blocks from quilt shows, flea markets and antique shops. I love taking a small old gem and tucking into a new project.

    —Janet Parker on July 28, 2018
  • I only had a great aunt who quilted. My mother has a few of her quilts. I love to sew and have just recently gotten back into quilting. I never did much quilting years ago so I’m excited about this new hobby/love!

    —Sherri M on July 28, 2018
  • This book looks so interesting. I would love to read stories of quilts. I have a quilt my mother made and it contains fabric from dresses she made for my grandmother, herself, my sister and me. I am currently making a quilt that has fabric from clothing I made for my daughter to give to her. Thanks for the giveaway!

    —Tina on July 28, 2018
  • I don’t have quilters in my family. I’m self taught. This looks like a fun book.

    —April Lopez on July 28, 2018
  • I love small projects just like what are in this wonderful book. I do not have any past ancestors who were quilters (that I know of). Thanks for the chance to win a copy of this amazing book.

    —Renea Yarolim on July 28, 2018
  • My MIL and her mother made several quilts which I have.

    —Roxanne on July 28, 2018
  • I have a quilt top that was handpieced in the 1920-1930’s by my great grandmother (she was around 70 at that time). I had the pleasure of knowing her until she passed away at age 97. I was also the happy recipient of a quilt she made for me. The quilt top noted in my first sentence has finally been Hand Quilted by Me this year. So, it has come full circle.

    I would love a copy of this book.

    —Lillian K on July 28, 2018
  • My grandmother had 13 children, and made quilts for all the beds. She even took wool suits apart to make warm quilts for her family

    —Carl B on July 28, 2018
  • I love old quilts and when I hold one and look at the fabrics and stitching I often wonder what the life of the person who made it was like. What kind of house did they have, did they garden, what inspired them to make this quilt, was it for someone special, did they make other quilts, and what were their dreams in life. My antique quilts are special to me because of theses questions.I hope some day someone will wonder about mine too.

    —Krissy Butorac on July 28, 2018
  • My mom tried quilting for a little while, but never really fell in love with it. In fact, she handed me a box and said, "Here, honey, you finish this." In it was the beginning of a cathedral window quilt. Maybe THAT’S why she didn’t fall in love!

    —pennyd on July 28, 2018
  • Love the book and the stories it contains; connections to the fabrics and lives of women of the past mean so much. I have several quilts my grandmother made and recognize some of the pieces used from other projects. My funniest quilting story was my grandma breaking her foot when she fell on the ice because her cane was a prop to hold her then-current project pieces. She finally liked the arrangement and refused to remove and use the cane!

    —Susan on July 28, 2018
  • I have a connection to the past thru my Great Grandmother. She was a great quilter and I have three of her quilts and several tops that have not been quilted. I am doing hand quilting like she had done. Love it. Recently on a trip to my mothers home I found in the attic several civil war era quilt blocks. I’m going to put each one in a shadow box and gift them to my quilt friends. I love quilting.

    —Karen Bruggman on July 28, 2018
  • Long time quilter…I was inspired by my grandmother. She had given me several quilts and tops. I hand quilt because of her. Such a hard worker. While visiting my mom this year I was in the attic and found civil war era blocks and will be putting them in a shadow box for family and friends.

    —Karen Bruggman on July 28, 2018
  • Awesome designer it’s a forever friendly touch

    Deb on July 28, 2018
  • My husbands grandmother was a quilter and tought me the quilting basics. We worked on a quilt together which I still own and treasure now that she’s no longer with us. I’ve started quilting again this year and so exited. This would or the perfect book to read and learn from.

    —Natasha on July 28, 2018
  • My grandmother was born in 1896, and died in 1978. She left me a quilt made by her mother or auntie. It’s probably from between 1890-1920. Wish my puppy hadn’t chewed one of the squares right in the middle! If that hadn’t happened, it would be in pretty good condition.

    —Peggy McCune on July 28, 2018
  • My grandmother and aunts were quilters, all by hand, of course, and using fabrics left from garments or feed sacks. I remember looking at the fabrics in their quilts and thinking they were so beautiful.
    I don’t know if they ever bought fabric just for quilting.

    —Ruth Spencer on July 28, 2018
  • My dad’s grandmother made him a baby quilt and one other. I have both.
    On my mom’s side they would quilt to stay warm during the PA winters. Happy Creating

    —Donna on July 28, 2018
  • My Mother finished a quilt that had been started by her Mother, my Grandmother–I am lucky enough to have it–It is in blues and whites and hand quilted by my Mother–a real treasure!

    —Barb K. on July 28, 2018
  • None of my family members was a quilter.

    —Anna on July 29, 2018
  • My mother was mainly a crafter but we did find a handsewn patchwork quilt that she was working on when she passed away. My sister and I knew lots of the fabrics she used because they were some of our childhood clothes, our dads clothes and several fabrics we recognized from table cloths and kitchen curtains. My mother’s grandmother also did some patchwork items that I was able to get the fabric scraps from recently. So I guess I do have some Quilty ancestors.

    —Tiffanee Noack on July 29, 2018
  • I had no idea my mother did patchwork until after she passed away. I found some patchwork that I quilted and gifted to my little sister for Christmas last year. My great grandmother also did patchwork but I never knew this until I received a box of her fabric scraps from an aunt that told me belonged to my great grandmother. I’d love to make one of the little Quilts in this lovely book.

    —Tiffanee Noack on July 29, 2018
  • There hadn’t been any other quilters in my family that I know of, but many years ago my mother, who liked sewing, suggested I take a quilting class with her at the local high school and got me hooked! She has since passed away, but I look on quilting as a way of remembering her. Thanks for the chance to win this lovely book!

    —Mary on July 29, 2018
  • My mother and grandmother made a number of Grandmother’s Fan quilt blocks in the l940’s. They were intended for my sister and myself, but never assembled into quilts. I assembled and hand-quilted them in the l990’s, and have made many since then.

    Gail on July 29, 2018
  • My grandmother made a quilt for my parents when they were married. I wasn’t able to locate it when my mother passed, but would have loved to have seen her handiwork as she passed away when I was a young girl. I have the quilt my mother in-law made for me after we were first married. All hand quilted.

    —Katharine Jenkins on July 29, 2018
  • My mother and both grandmothers were quilters. Some of my fondest childhood memories are of playing beneath the quilt frame while my maternal grandmother worked.

    —Linda W on July 29, 2018
  • My mother and both of my grandmothers were quilters. Some of my fondest childhood memories are of playing beneath the quilt frame while my maternal grandmother worked.

    —Linda W on July 29, 2018
  • My mother and grandmother both quilted — my mother loved to watch Jeopardy and Wheel of Fortune and hand sew her quilt blocks.

    —Regina Harris on July 29, 2018
  • My great grandma was a quilter, I have a quilt that she made. It’s in pretty rough shape because it’s been used and loved for many, many years.

    —Laura Sloan on July 29, 2018
  • My 93 year old mother still quilts. Her mother got me interested in quilting when I visited her for a week during the Summer. I still own the quilt I made when I was seven. Sweet Sun flower Sue. It has blocks my mother also did. All made from the scrapes of the dress I worn to School.

    —Linda Christianson on July 29, 2018
  • I love Kathleen’s books. Great for learning and her quilts patterns are the best. Thank you for publishing her books.

    —Cleo on July 29, 2018
  • My grandmother was a quilter. As we went through her things, we found boxes of quilt tops she had made for her children, grandchildren, and even her great-grandchildren! She used what she available. We found flour sacks mixed with 30s fabrics with newer cottons. All done well and many handstitched with the tiniest stitches.

    —Kathie Feller on July 29, 2018
  • My gramma was the quilter, although we have many sewers as well. When we went through Gramma’s thing we discovered boxes of quilt tops for her children, grandchildren and even her great-grandchildren! Using what she had, they were all made well and with love.

    —Kathie Feller on July 29, 2018
  • My dad’s mom was a quilter. She had the church ladies over every week to make quilts for the missionaries. The quilt frame was lowered from the ceiling and set on supports so they could do the quilting. When my aunt was a child, she would help by threading the needles for the ladies. My grandma died at the age of 88 when I was 7. I was given her sewing basket.

    —Ellee on July 30, 2018
  • My grandmother made me and my 4 siblings a quilt, hand quilted, and I dont recall what size squares, but all squares. I recall some of it falling apart but that’s all I recall. Back then I didnt appreciate all of the time and effort a quilter goes through making a quilt, I was just a child. Today I notice that many still do not. I would love to still have that quilt.

    —LisaT on July 30, 2018
  • No connection to past quilters .. as far as I know no one in my family has ever quilted. dquilterguy48329 (at) prodigy (dot) net

    —Darrell on July 30, 2018
  • I’m thso e only quilted in my family and they do t quite understand why I spend so much time creating until I gift them one, then they are marveled

    —Betsy on July 31, 2018
  • I have a couple quilts of my great-grandmother’s, but I don’t know if she made them. I am the first quilter in recent generations.

    —Diantha Howard on July 31, 2018
  • Love old quilts and the history that often follows them. My grandmother was a quilter but passed away before I started quilting. Feel blessed to have some of her quilts and tops.

    —Melba Burnham on July 31, 2018

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.