Mending is trending: give new life to old favorites with visible mending (+ giveaway!)

When is a hole-in-one not a happy event? When it’s a hole in one of your favorite sweaters! Some of us shed a tear when we find a tear in our go-to pair of jeans. But you can turn those frowns upside down with ideas for repairing lovingly worn garments with Visible Mending.

Visible Mending

In this virtual guide to giving worn clothing and fabric items new life, you’ll discover not only inspiration and eye candy (35 examples and 150+ photos), but multiple how-to methods to experiment with—Japanese boro stitching, embroidery, darning, patching, and machine mending.

From the Visible Mending book

The toughest part isn’t choosing which method to try, it’s finding enough things that need mending. But don’t worry. We’ll keep your secret, even if you “mend” something that wasn’t really torn to begin with. Yep, that’s right—the results are so cute you’ll be ripping things apart just to have a reason to mend.

From Visible Mending

Jenny Wilding Cardon is the author of Visible Mending, and she’s going to share with you what drives her mending madness. We’re lucky to work with her every day (that’s right, she’s a Martingale employee by day, mender by night)! So, Jenny, give us your take on why mending is trending!

—Jennifer Keltner
Chief Visionary Officer, Martingale


Jenny Wilding CardonThank you for the introduction, Jennifer!

Stitch This! friends, it’s been my pleasure to write for this blog since Martingale’s inaugural post in March 2012. As of today, I’ve written 986 posts as Martingale’s content editor. Oh my heck, can you believe that? I think I have the best job in the world, sharing all the latest and greatest books from Martingale’s talented and inspiring authors with you.

But today’s post is different. Today I get to share with you my very own book. My baby! It’s called Visible Mending, and I hope it will stop you in your tracks—particularly if you’re a quilter who’s been asked by a family member or friend to mend something for them. (I mean, what quilter hasn’t had that happen?)

I’ve been a quilter since 1997, long before I turned to mending as a creative outlet. And I think there are two things you need in order to be creative: skills and ideas. The sewing skills I’ve learned as a quilter have made the transition to visible mending an easy one. And since I already had the skills, I could jump right to the ideas!

Of course, I know all about sewing patches:

Visible mending patches
This patch on the back of a sweater consists of woven strips from a fat-quarter pack

And I already have basic embroidery stitches in my quilting tool belt:

Visible Mending embroidery
A simple eyelet stitch mends a hole in a sweater; I added a little embroidery sampler around the hole for flair

The Japanese tradition of boro stitching couldn’t be easier—a simple running stitch is all you need to begin:

Visible mending boro stitching
With boro stitching you can mend holes with patches under or on top of a tear, using as many or as few fabrics as you like

Darning was new to me—but again, straight stitches are the foundation for the technique:

Visible mending - darning
Darning is fun to do on both knit fabrics (left) and woven fabrics (right)

And sewing by machine? Are you kidding me? Me and my machine are besties!

Visible mending by machine
These patches are secured with free-motion stitching

I use so many of my quilting skills in my visible-mending projects. But the best part? This unique kind of mending is fun and creative, quick to complete—and sew fun to show off!

Visible mending jacket
This boro-stitched elbow patch is one of my favorite mends from the book

There’s one more thing about visible mending that I think marries perfectly with quilting: the idea of using what you have and creatively making do, just like our quilting sisters of yesteryear did with their quilts. In a world of fast fashion and throwaway quality, visible mending offers the opportunity to step away from that world and put love, thought, and care into pieces we truly treasure.

visible mending tablecloth
A stain on a tablecloth from my grandmother gets a new life with an embroidered “mend”

Visible Mending is half how-to book, half inspiration guide. My goal is to provide a technique book for people who have never sewn before and an inspiration book for people who have been sewing all their lives. And in the book I’ve created an experiment just for you. When clothing or other textiles (yes, even quilts!) become worn and torn, think of it as an opportunity for creativity. Follow along in the book and you’ll soon be giving a new life to items you might otherwise throw away, all while letting your creativity take center stage.

An exciting experiment is waiting for you inside the pages of Visible Mending, and it starts with this: embrace the imperfect. Make do and mend. Repair it and wear it. I hope you’ll join me on this fun sewing adventure!

Follow Jenny online:
 Remade Nation blog   Instagram


Visible MendingWe have a copy of Visible Mending to give away today! To enter your name in the drawing, tell us in the comments:

Which of your quilting skills might you use with Visible Mending?

  • I know all about patches and embroidery.
  • I can sew a running stitch like nobody’s business.
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!

We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win. Good luck! And if you’re ready to start a visible-mending adventure right now, you can order Visible Mending at our website and instantly download the eBook for free.

Comments are closed for this post.

Thanks to all who entered the drawing! The winner is Maureen, who says:

“Patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to give them all a try.”

We’ll email you about your prize, Maureen—congratulations!


272 Comments (leave a comment)

  • I know about patches and embroidery. Back in the 70’s, I patched a pair of my favorite jeans with patches and embroidered over them. Thanks for the giveaway, I would love to try some new techniques!

    —Deb G. in VA on June 27, 2018
  • I don’t k7a thing about mending. The saboro stitch looks awesome 👍

    —Betsy Lewis on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above! I have been doing creative mending for 50 years. In this house we recycle and reuse everything. I still darn socks since my husbsnd and i both love the expensive wool ones. Love the ideas. Thanks for a chance to win the book.

    —Liz Dyer on June 27, 2018
  • I know about patches.

    —AS on June 27, 2018
  • I can do embroidery but this whole effort is new to me?!? Love the tablecloth repair!

    —Janice on June 27, 2018
  • Love the new ideas this would bring ,with grandkids clothes…..love learning new things

    —Donna on June 27, 2018
  • For the last year or so I’ve been taking a monthly "Stitch Class" at my local quilt show … each month we’ve learned several new embroidery stitches. I see this "trend" as an opportunity to show off and utilize the stitches I’ve learned. A "child of the 60’s" Visible Mending reminds of an era when stitching was "cool" (not sure that word is "cool" anymore LOL). I utilize all my sewing skills, whether by hand or machine, with orphan blocks or yarn to create new things from "old". What a fun topic!! I signed up for Jenny’s Instagram posts, too!

    —Linda H on June 27, 2018
  • Thank you for the follow on Instagram, Linda – we love "cool!" 😄 –Jenny

    —Jenny Wilding Cardon on June 27, 2018
  • I can do embroidery but this whole effort is new to me?!? Love the tablecloth repair!

    —Janice on June 27, 2018
  • I know about patches, love it.

    —Tamara on June 27, 2018
  • I can do a running stitch. Would like to learn more.

    —Jane Larke on June 27, 2018
  • Big Stitch is a current favorite of mine. I think it would adapt nicely to Visible Mending!

    —Debra Freese on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve always wondered what I can do with sweaters that get holes in them. Matter of fact, I have one now that I love to wear, but discovered a hole in it last time I wore it. Love to have ideas to show me how to hide it and then perhaps copy the effect on other places on the sweater!

    —Peggy on June 27, 2018
  • I can do some embroidery, but would like to learn more.

    —Linda on June 27, 2018
  • I have done lots of stitching by hand this looks very interesting and I think I could use the tablecloth repair many times over as I have a collection of vintage linens!

    —Colleen Lawrence on June 27, 2018
  • I know a bit about patches and embroidery, but am loving this new spin! This book is so visually compelling-LOVE it!! I’m working on a few stitching projects to complement my industrial design efforts so am happily knee deep in embroidery life and cannot wait to apply some of what I’ve learned there to this whole new genre! So inspired- THANK YOU, Jenny! 🙂

    Jen on June 27, 2018
  • My mom used to mend clothes and darn socks. She still mends antique cloth items. I work in a thrift store and see so many items come in with either stains or holes. What a great way to save some of them.

    —Kalen on June 27, 2018
  • I have done a lot of hand stitching and have a collection of vintage linens so I think I could use the ideas in this book

    —Colleen Lawrence on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above except darning ( I’ve never done any darning, but I’m ready to learn). All the examples are so cute and inspiring!

    —Ramona Carpenter on June 27, 2018
  • Can’t wait to try all of the above!

    —Molly on June 27, 2018
  • I could use all of them especially the jeans and tablecloth. Would love to have these ideas.

    —Myra Sattler on June 27, 2018
  • I know all about patches and embroidery. I’ve never darned before or boro-stitched but would love to learn. Visible Mending is such a great idea! Not only does it breathe new life into old favorites, it gives them a unique, creative look! Thank you, Jenny and Martingale, for this fun giveaway!

    —Linda B on June 27, 2018
  • I love hand work, love to reuse, repurpose, and repair to get the "good" out of an item. I love the idea of decorating a loved item to make it "new" again and will use many of the quilting skills I have learned in my prize winning quilts!!!

    Sandi Henderson on June 27, 2018
  • All the above. I love all the great ideas featured in this post!

    —Janice Mc Laren on June 27, 2018
  • I grew up on a farm and learned to mend as a teen. I’ve mended a lot of jeans and work clothes. It’s fun to make creative patches and the granddaughters love lace and bright colors added to their jeans. No one knows there’s a hole under there. I love the ideas of creative stitches on her sweaters. There’s a lot of new ideas in her book.

    —Judy Clark on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work – I’m ready to mend!

    —Jean in FL on June 27, 2018
  • I certainly could use Visible Mending in a big way!! I iron on patches when needed and i have done a little embroidery but have never done anything like what’s being shown in Visible Mending! What a useful and fun book this is! Thanks for a chance to win.
    Carmen

    —Carmen Montmarquet on June 27, 2018
  • I have done a lot of straight stitch mending. Like the idea of decorative mending. Don’t know if I’m really entering the contest as I never see my comments listed.

    Hi Kathy, our comments go through an approval process before being published so it takes a little time, but rest assured that you are entered into the drawing! –Jenny

    —Kathy A on June 27, 2018
  • I do have embroidery and quilting skills but I don’t think I have ever mended anything and used those to make it look this good. Love all the pictures. Thank you for showing us exactly what’s inside each book. So helpful when you don’t have the book in your hands to thumb through.

    —Shellie on June 27, 2018
  • My mother was queen of iron-on patches. I learned/developed other techniques to hide the patches! I’ve tried a lot of things over the years, but this looks like it has some new possibilities.

    —Stephanie on June 27, 2018
  • I can do a running stitch!

    —L Thorne on June 27, 2018
  • I’m ashamed to admit that I don’t mend. This book is just what I need to start

    —Stephanie Woodward on June 27, 2018
  • I can do a running stitch. But willing to explore and learn.

    —Becky DuBose on June 27, 2018
  • Mend according to my mood of the day. Hand embroidery looks so pretty but is sometimes difficult if it done through thicker fabric or inside a pant leg. Patches are easiest. Darning is fast. Want to do some prettier mending so your book would be very useful. Thanks for the giveaway!

    —Amy Cofer on June 27, 2018
  • I can do a running stitch!

    —Linda on June 27, 2018
  • Mend, mend, mend. Would love to win a book.

    —Kathy A on June 27, 2018
  • I would be comfortable using any of the techniques in this book I love the creativity. Some of my antique linens do have holes and stains and these ideas are wonderful for reviving them. A hole in a favorite jacket or sweater no longer means a trip to recycle with these great ideas.

    —Maria L Zook on June 27, 2018
  • Mending? What is mending? I’d rather be quilting! But I can mend if I have to 🙂

    —Vicky on June 27, 2018
  • I have gotten rid of many items over the years that could have looked so cute had I known about mending!! I can certainly use patches but the embroidery has caught my eye!!

    —Kathy on June 27, 2018
  • I can do a running stitch but would love to learn more.

    —Becky DuBose on June 27, 2018
  • “Visible Mending” looks like a very fun book. Even though I do embroidery and mend jeans, I could use ideas for more creative mending.

    —Marilynn D-R on June 27, 2018
  • I think I am ready to stitch. The book looks very interesting!

    —Stephanie L. on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve been patching things for years! The first patch I did after getting married was a heart on the backside of a pair of his jeans…his coworkers teased him…he replied, "She loves me!"

    —Cecelia A Samuelson on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above. I have granddaughters who would love this as well. Thanks for sharing.

    —Janey on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve done patch mending in cute ways, but want to try mending with embroidery. I especially love the stitching that reminds me of sashiko. I think I have some pants with a hole in the knee….I’m going to go find them right now!

    —Amber on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above, I’m ready to mend

    —Kathy O on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve been given a quilt that my Grandmother made. One corner is destroyed. My dad used it as a moving blanket! I had wanting to repair it but had no idea how to do this. Maybe I will give this a try.

    —Tonya on June 27, 2018
  • I can embroider but I usually try to hide mending. Making the mending a feature is a new approach for me. I love the embroidery on the tablecloth.

    —MoeWest on June 27, 2018
  • When I was 8, I tore a hole in a brand new (Mom made) jumper. Mom appliqued fruits cut from a print fabric, one over the hole and 2 more for balance. It was adorable. I have used the same technique many times over the years. These other ideas are inspiring.

    —Nancy on June 27, 2018
  • I know a running stitch…LOL!!!

    —jackie norwood on June 27, 2018
  • I’m ready to mend with these cute tricks

    —Virginia Over on June 27, 2018
  • I’s like to try All Of The Above. Such great ideas!

    —Debby T on June 27, 2018
  • I would lov3 to use all of the above – patches, embroidery, darning, machine work. I am ready to mend, and want to repurpose and upcycle some items in my closet.

    —Tess McCarthy on June 27, 2018
  • I’m ready to mend.

    —Virginia Over on June 27, 2018
  • Patches were the go to mend years ago. I enjoy embroidery so the idea of using it to patch a hole if intriguing. I would like to try all the above.

    Kristie on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above! I pride myself in my invisible mending skills but I’m anxious for the opportunity to be creative when it isn’t possible to hide. This book is for me, thank you!

    —Karen on June 27, 2018
  • My favorite shirt has a hole that seems unmendable, but I just could NOT throw it away. Now I’m glad I didn’t. This book may have the perfect answer!

    —Nancy on June 27, 2018
  • This is a clever way to keep wearing and using things you love. I might NEED to try this.

    —Cindy on June 27, 2018
  • Patching with embroidery is a wonderful idea. Combining mending with artwork sounds like fun.

    —Liz on June 27, 2018
  • I think I NEED to give this a try.

    —Cindy on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve done few patches over the years but seeing these makes me yearn to find something to mend.

    —ANN D on June 27, 2018
  • I know it all! I like this idea! Although, I don’t think it will work for school uniforms!

    —Helen on June 27, 2018
  • I don’t do much mending but this book would inspire me to do more.

    —Joanne L Wilson on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve been sewing by hand and machine almost all my life and also have done embroidery, so this book would be great.

    —Susan Green on June 27, 2018
  • I did some embroidery patching back in the 70’s but nothing since then. This looks like a fun book.

    —Pamela Jones on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve been doing embroidery and cross-stitch for decades, but this would be a new use for me. It looks like a great way to restore worn items.

    —Karen on June 27, 2018
  • Patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to give them all a try.

    —Maureen Haynes on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve been doing embroidery and cross-stitch for decades, but using them to repair damaged items would be new – it looks great!

    —Karen on June 27, 2018
  • I have used all of the techniques for mending. I like the expanded explanations and creative ideas presented in the book. This would make a great addition to my library!

    Susan Case on June 27, 2018
  • I can use all of those methods. My teenage granddaughters might like something like that- maybe even try it themselves – they are interested in sewing. I also have a pair of jeans that needs a "redo" patch – I will have some fun with it !

    —Nancy C on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve been doing embroidery and cross-stitch for decades, but I’ve never tried using it this way – it looks great!

    —Karen on June 27, 2018
  • Running stitch is just about my speed when it comes to hand sewing!! I’m so excited to try out these techniques!

    —Zoe on June 27, 2018
  • I can do a running stitch, but mending might be fun if I learn how to creatively do visible mending.

    —marlene on June 27, 2018
  • I’d use all of the above and make tiny pieces of art with each patch! So cool!

    —Kathy E. on June 27, 2018
  • Well, I obviously do running stitches, and I can patch and do some embroidery, but I’m no expert.

    —Jane on June 27, 2018
  • OMGodzilla! I love this idea. I might even mend over some stains I have on my favorite tops. Gotta try this right away and I would love to win this book. Thank you!

    —Barbara Dahl on June 27, 2018
  • I can mend and learned embroidery as a child, but I think this looks cool. I’ve certainly sewn on patches to cover untimely rips and holes, but this takes mending to a whole new level!

    —Geri on June 27, 2018
  • I ❤️ Boro stitching after having been to Okinawa! Anything boro…count me in.

    —Connie K on June 27, 2018
  • This is so FUN! My late mom always mended clothing like this – she was a trendsetter! I can do a variety of embroidery stitches, but hadn’t considered the wonderful eyelet stitch and mini-sampler for a hole in a sweater – genius!

    —Elizabeth Bolton on June 27, 2018
  • I know some of the techniques like embroidery, patches and machine work but there is so much more to learn. Looks like an awesome book.

    —Sylvia Rainey on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above -I am ready to mend!

    —Susan Spiers on June 27, 2018
  • I know basic embroidery stitches and do hand quilting as well. I am looking forward to using how-to’s from the book for mending and for textile decoration!

    —Valeriya on June 27, 2018
  • I can do a running stitch. I’ve also done mending on my favourite socks. I did a form of this on a sweater I loved, but tried to hide it. Now I’d do it as a Visible Mend and love it even more.

    —Susan Burney on June 27, 2018
  • I help teach young people in 4H during the school year. Mending skills would be a great asset and this book could help me! I just do a darning stitch usually.

    —Nikki DeRamus Moshier on June 27, 2018
  • I sometimes mend with an embroidery patch or just patch up jeans.

    —beth d. on June 27, 2018
  • Laughing… this reminds me of my college days in the early 1970’s when adding patches onto our jean tote bags was quite "the thing". Love the boro stitches depicted and haven’t tried such, but otherwise I’ve mended decorative "saves" for stained or torn items for years.

    —Martha on June 27, 2018
  • Reminds me of growing up in a large family with lots of hand me down clothes. I’m a child of the 60s and 70s and often decorated old clothes to look new. So happy to see this new publication and would love to add it to my library.

    —sharon butera on June 27, 2018
  • Whoa, I like the looks of this, my girls would love it too!! I am a basic straight stitcher girl. I wish I could do this stuff!

    —Sunnie Iacovetta on June 27, 2018
  • I often add "patches" made from novelty fabrics or something with a cute motif, but I apply them from the inside of the garment to be mended…that way the motif peeks out as if from the inside. I mended a pair of jeans for my brother with Super Mario peeking out (I didn’t tell him that the patch came from a pair of old boxer shorts).

    —Teri N on June 27, 2018
  • Definitely all of the above. There are a few items of clothing that are my favorites, but I don’t wear because of a small boo-boo on them. If I could attractively cover them up, like the grandmother’s tablecloth, I could save them.

    —Kathy on June 27, 2018
  • I have done lots of patching, mending and darning over the years. This gives you “fun” options for repairing things. What a great idea!

    —Chris on June 27, 2018
  • Definitely all of the above. I like the idea of saving some of my items of clothing that have a little boo-boo on them. To cover them like grandmother’s tablecloth would be great.

    —Kathy on June 27, 2018
  • When I was little and I got a hole in my clothes, my granny would say, "We’ll just sew a little ladybug on it." While the ladybug was cute, I like the look of this new mending much better!

    Kristin on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above. I used to not like mending, but with many children and little time to sew–I learned to actually enjoy mending clothes.

    —Lisa on June 27, 2018
  • The embroidered flowers on jeans, (I did this on jeans way back in college)

    —Karen Uresk on June 27, 2018
  • This is so cool. It will come in handy when needed.would love to win. thanks

    —Rhonda Maxfield on June 27, 2018
  • Mom started me out when I was 5, that was 60 years ago. So happy to see a book that puts mending in the spot light. Would love to win this book to add to my granddaughters care package I am putting together for her to take to college this fall.

    —Sherry on June 27, 2018
  • Making a damaged garment wearable again gives such a sense of accomplishment. That feeling is sometimes even better than being able to wear the cherished item again.

    —Sarah Coker on June 27, 2018
  • I am old enough to know about these techniques. I am delighted that visible mending is now trending! So, to answer your question: All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!

    —Laura M on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve embroidered all my life since I was a child. I look forward to learning to put it to practical use for mending. Sew excited!

    —Becky Hooper on June 27, 2018
  • Kantha embroidery would work well too – can’t wait to find something that ‘needs’ mending.

    —Helen Lawrie on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above…in addition to solving damage, adds a decorative element.

    —Marilyn Fite on June 27, 2018
  • Embroidery, patches & applique oh my!

    —Carol Gearey on June 27, 2018
  • I would try all of them! I would love to have this book.

    —Christy on June 27, 2018
  • All the above

    —MS Barb on June 27, 2018
  • Using embroidery to mend is so clever. I can’t wait to try it.

    —Nell on June 27, 2018
  • Jenny has great colour and design idas for this book Visible mending. As a child of the seventies I did some embroidery on blouses, jeans and shirts for my husband! Her designs and ideas of how to mend this way are exciting to think about! I wonder if the youngsters nowadays in their already torn expensive jeans will try it! Lol. Can’t wait to try this!

    —Mary on June 27, 2018
  • I have done cute stitches around cutoff pants to make them into shorts. Looking forward to more ideas!

    —Nyla-Jean on June 27, 2018
  • I am more than ready to move on to such attractive visible mending after many many years mending my boys clothes; mostly jeans and snow pants. I can’t wait to get this book. Great ideas!

    —Kathleen King on June 27, 2018
  • I usually don’t like to mend but this makes it look fun. Can use my knowledge of embroidery.

    —Carol on June 27, 2018
  • I can sew a running stitch like nobody’s business! For the rest of it, I believe I’d find this book very helpful.

    —Laura on June 27, 2018
  • I’m ready to mend! This is a whole new concept for me.

    carolyn temple on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above. I would like to show my students how to sew and to recycle clothing. This would be a lovely activity that would reduce items sent to landfill sites and would also lower their anxiety levels. Definitely a win-win activity.
    Thanks

    —Kathleen Mannion on June 27, 2018
  • Actually, I’ve never thought about mending this way! What a genius idea! I could use your helpful pointers in ALL areas!

    —Teri Gailey on June 27, 2018
  • I love the covering stains ideas! I have some old linens from my Grandmother that I can rejuvinate and pass on to my grandchildren. And who doesn’t have a "brand new" shirt with a stain?

    —Kris Thomas on June 27, 2018
  • I’m not a very good "mender" but there are some awesome ideas here, thank you!

    —Laura Greig on June 27, 2018
  • I like visible mending and used it a few times.

    —A. Bouwman on June 27, 2018
  • Reminds me of some of the clothing decorations in the 60s-70s. Some really inspiring photos. I’ve not tried visible mending, but it could be great on some Goodwill items showing a hole or two. Great fun!

    —Mona on June 27, 2018
  • How cool! Mending without the stress of making it invisible or unnoticeable almost sounds like fun. I can do machine stitching without blinking an eye and a little of hand embroidery and machine darning, so I am on the way to getting it done! This book sounds perfect.

    —Eileen on June 27, 2018
  • My mom was a mender and taught me a few tricks though I never was fond of doing it. This book almost makes one want to get creative with this task!!

    —Betty on June 27, 2018
  • I could learn a lot from this book, it’s beautiful. This is the most lovely mending I’ve ever seen, this book would be super handy for me.

    —Joan on June 27, 2018
  • I have never thought of this idea but WWWWWWWWWWWWOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOWWWWWWWWWWWWW!
    WHAT A A CONCEPT! And I can sew a running stitch like anyone’s business!

    —Marion Lisko on June 27, 2018
  • I think I can handle patching with running stitches and some embroidery.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win!
    kakingsbury at verizon dot net

    —Kathleen on June 27, 2018
  • Love this. I have been mending clothes for years. Patches, embroidery whatever else I could do…

    —Lori on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above. I love looking at a tear and deciding what it looks like. One time my 5 y.o. son had three little holes and a bigger one below it on the knee of his jeans. I thought it looked sorta like a footprint, so I cut a ‘toe hole’ and then lined the entire area with a bright color. He loved those jeans.

    —Sherry Jurykovsky on June 27, 2018
  • I’m not at all fond of mending, but I would like the ideas for covering stains. I tend to throw out things (shirts, mostly) if they get a stain on them. It might be fun to resurrect them instead!

    —Dottie Macomber on June 27, 2018
  • I can do patching and embroidery but have not tried machine darning.

    —Rebecca Boukikaz on June 27, 2018
  • I love to recycle and reuse. I also love to applique and embroider. This book would give me many ideas to do both. Thank you for the chance to win it.

    —Barb Darnell on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above! I love handwork, and the idea of saving a loved piece of textiles is great!

    —Robin M. on June 27, 2018
  • Since I have become a quilter, I have lived by the motto, "You wouldn’t ask Picasso to paint your garage, so don’t ask a quilter to mend your jeans." But I might have to change my motto, because this book looks delightful!

    —Carol on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above.

    —Sharon on June 27, 2018
  • WOW! I always tried to hide my mending, now I think I’ll make it stand out! Thanks for the inspiration.

    —Susan on June 27, 2018
  • When you mend something, the mending is rarely invisible, and it mostly just looks bad. I really like the idea of this book – make the mend big and bold and embellish it! That way it enhances rather than detracts from the look of the garment!

    Barbara Johnson on June 27, 2018
  • Brilliant. I am not fond of the ripped craze, but love this!

    —Maria Goetz on June 27, 2018
  • My daughter is always bringing me things to fix. Most times it is a small hole in a pair of pants or a pocket. This would be the ideal book to use to creatively fix these problems. I have already used embroidery to cover up holes in linens that I just didn’t want to throw away.

    —Gloria Albright on June 27, 2018
  • I have never tried patching like this! Have a few pieces of clothes I will be experimenting with soon!

    elr on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work–I’m ready to mend! But I would need to learn embroidery and darning first!

    —Linda M on June 27, 2018
  • These are such great ideas. I used to mend my children’s clothes when they were little, but these add so much to the item and make them special.

    —Mary Beth McKelvey on June 27, 2018
  • I have the skills for visible mending, but I sure could use some inspiration! Looks like a fabulous book!

    —Leslie Hoff on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve used the long stitch in quilting but am intrigued by mending with it, or even fake mending because it looks good. Have used embroidery and applique to mend. The book looks like fun.

    —Rose Haury on June 27, 2018
  • I know about both embroidery and patches. However, I haven’t thought about combining them to mend a garment. I’m sure my teenage granddaughter would love to see this book, she could embellish some of her clothing using these techniques. Thank you for the giveaway opportunity.

    —Deborah B. on June 27, 2018
  • I have used embroidery to incorporate small holes in garments, but I never thought of using actual quilt patches. The book has some great ideas, and I love handwork to start with.

    —SandyMay on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!

    Mary Kolb on June 27, 2018
  • I have 3 pairs of favorite jeans that have the left knee ripped – always in the same spot! Can’t wait to try some of the mending techniques in this book.

    —Vicki on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve done some fusible applique by machine, I guess that counts?

    —Meta Bonnell on June 27, 2018
  • Thx for the giveaway!
    I know nothing about quilting but can sew a running stitch 😉 and I’m very interested in learning new mending technics. I discover visible mending on Instagram, and wish to find a embroidery mending course in Berlin where I’m living.. know I’m gonna try this Japanese boro stitching 🙂

    —lea on June 27, 2018
  • I think applique & embroidery skills would be applied.
    This is such an eye-opening post detailing the book and with such great images.
    thx

    —LORRAINE IN SFV on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, machine work, etc.

    —Kim Brownell on June 27, 2018
  • I’m excited to use any and all of my quilting skills towards mending. I love the uniqueness and creativity this allows. Keeping my fingers crossed.

    —Cheryl Warstler on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above. Would love to win this book. Thank you for doing this give-away.

    —Susan on June 27, 2018
  • Well I have slot of company in this group who mention the 70’s but I started in the early 60’s as I taught myself to sew with a machine and a needle and thread. Mom always had a metal fruitcake can and a whisker basket full of hand tools and thread. She made lined baskets with needlepoint lids and there were planets of scraps. Can’t say at 11 I was stellar hand stitcher with perfectly even Stitches….time was flying and I needed to get back to what I was doing so twitch/patch/mend whatever was expedient and GO!!!

    The book brings in my embroidery and knitting background too. The pictures should be lots of fun besides inspirational. Looks like a great book.

    I hear something calling me???? Yup that book wants to come live in Wisc with Me… :0)

    Jane Modjeski

    —Jane Modjeski on June 27, 2018
  • Oh I love this – the running stitches look so wonderful, I really want to give it a go.

    —Pauline C on June 27, 2018
  • I try many varieties of mending. I would love to see this book. Maybe it has some ideas that would work on men’s clothing, too.

    —Ruth on June 27, 2018
  • Would like to tackle mending with embroidery and patchwork

    —Karen Preusser on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve been doing hand work since I was six & my Mom taught me to mend everything. If it can be fixed then u fixed it before buying new. Repurpose as much as u can was how I was raised. This book gives a wonderful new spin on just mending! Anxious for the arrival of this book

    Susan on June 27, 2018
  • My mom showed my how to mend when I was 8 or 9, and I’ve been doing so ever since. I started out fixing small things on handed-down clothes from 2 older sisters, and evolved to adding vintage ribbon and lace to thrifted denim. I’ve been mending my 3 sons’ Levis forever, and have found so much of what I did out of necessity ten years ago was boro and sashiko-like stitching.

    —Teresa P on June 27, 2018
  • I became a whiz at patching barbed wire torn jeans and baled hay worn out insulated bib coveralls for my late rancher husband. I think doing "fun" patches with grandkids and great niece sounds like a wonderful change of pace. Heck, I might dig out some of my ‘ranch’ jeans and make them fashion wear.

    —M Hebel on June 27, 2018
  • I have done a lot of mending and some of it has been a bit creative. The ideas in this book would help me expand on my skills and be even more creative.

    —Cassy L. on June 27, 2018
  • I would love to be able to mend! I know zero about mending and these examples look GORGEOUS!!

    —Anne Boundy on June 27, 2018
  • How inspirational! I’m ready to mend

    —Kerry Grose on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above! I love embroidered patches and just embroidered some for two pairs of jeans and two jean jackets to make some "new" outfits for myself. I would love to win this book and learn some new methods for repairing items or just adding new patches and embroidery for fashion statements.

    —Gail Beam on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embrodiery, darning (well maybe not darming) machine work, I’m ready to mend if i win the book and have some ideas to refer to that is! Would love this book.

    —Ann on June 27, 2018
  • Having learned the traditional (boring), practical method of mending, I have never enjoyed this task. The mends in this book are beautiful and I look forward to doing some mending now. Thanks for the chance to win such an inspiring book.

    —LynneP on June 27, 2018
  • I became a whiz at patching barbed wire ripped jeans and hay bale worn out insulated bib overalls for my late rancher husband. Fun patching would make a great project to do with grandkids and great niece. Heck, I might even dig out some of my own ‘ranch’ jeans in need of repair and turn them into ‘fashion’ jeans.

    —M Hebel on June 27, 2018
  • I have done sashimi and born stitching. Your ideas take it a step farther. I’m looking forward to your book.

    —Sandra Rosier on June 27, 2018
  • I love the idea of wearing art that’s been handstitched. I hand piece. I hand applique. I embroider. These skills can all be translated into this more mending which yields such unique and organic art. Thanks for sharing all this inspiration with us.

    —Amy Rochelle on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve been mending for years -these look like great ideas!

    —Kathy on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above! I am ready to mend.

    —Barbara Wiggins on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above! I love the variety of the different types of mending. I would love to win this book!

    —Jane Reed on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve tried invisible mending but love the idea of visible mending.

    —Jenny on June 27, 2018
  • I love the idea of visible mending, my invisible mending hasn’t been so successful!

    —Jenny A on June 27, 2018
  • Learned traditional mending as a teen and now many, many years later, still mend what I can. This book is so motivational. I like to pick up old linens at thrift shops, this books made me want to go find more, more, more. Cool ideas!

    —B Baker on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!
    I do patch on occasion, but it was my mother who was the queen of patching for 11 kids living on a farm. It was imperative to be able to make clothes last as long as possible. I think the only thing she didn’t do was replace a zipper in jeans.

    —Rita S on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above. I learned some creative mending techniques from my mother.

    —Jean on June 27, 2018
  • What an interesting book! Even though I have done some mending with patches and embroidery, I would love to try some of the creative ideas in Jenny’s book. Thanks for the great giveaway.

    —Bonnie on June 27, 2018
  • I am a weaver as well as quilter so can see me using my weaving samples as a patchwork pattern to do some mending. I have some beautiful sweaters that the moths have had a go at, I need to use this book/techniques to rescue my sweaters!

    —Michelle on June 27, 2018
  • I love hand sewing and embroidery!! I’m very interested in boro stitching and patching. The book looks wonderful.

    —Linda on June 27, 2018
  • my mending skills are a bit basic – running stitch on patches is my go to. I love the mending culture – less clothes waste! this book would be amazing inspiration.

    —Suzanne Keal on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above methods ! So many possibilities !

    —Rosemarie on June 27, 2018
  • Such a great idea! This would make mending so much more fun!

    —Donna on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve used embroidery and patches before, but this carries darning to a new height.

    —Betty nelson on June 27, 2018
  • I have all the skills, but have never used them for mending … I’ll have to give it a try!

    —Paula on June 27, 2018
  • I’m a beginner. I need all the help I can get.

    —Kay on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above. I am earing a t-shirt that was almost ruined by a bleach splash It is covered with a patch of lace, but I haven’t always been so inventive.

    —ELIZABETH CROSS on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend! I have always mended clothing. There are some new techniques I would like to try in this innovative mending book!

    —Debra Miller on June 27, 2018
  • I can embroider and sew patches but I’ve never figured out how to use them to really mend clothing well.

    —Judith Martinez on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve done a bit of creative mending over the years. It looks like this book has some great new ideas.

    —Jackie Lewis on June 27, 2018
  • I know about patching and have embroidery skills. I am definitely going to start trying some creative mending as it looks like it turns what is a chore to me into something fun.

    —Judy on June 27, 2018
  • I’ve done some visible mending over the years. But it looks like this book has some wonderful creative ideas.

    —Jackie Lewis on June 27, 2018
  • I’d ripe my clothes to learn these techniques.

    —Rita on June 27, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!

    —Debbie Chenoweth on June 27, 2018
  • wowza! what fantastic and fashion fun fixes… i would say i am a master embroidery, a great hand sewer and kinda a quilter.. 🙂

    —julie on June 28, 2018
  • I tried a running stitch….not very evenly; I’m sure this book would help me learn much new to use skills. Thanks for the chance to win!

    —carol on June 28, 2018
  • I tried a running stitch, it was not very even. I’m sure this book would help me. Thanks for the chance to win!

    —carol on June 28, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend all those thread bare jeans I have and some of my favorite comfy shirts that have stains!

    Anita Jackson on June 28, 2018
  • I have been mending for over fifty years! So, all of the above. Makes me happy to see it’s in style

    —Carol Deiber on June 28, 2018
  • I would love to learn machine patching.—Melissa Robinson

    —Melissa Robinson on June 28, 2018
  • As 1 of 5 kids growing up in the 50’s & 60’s life was about recycled clothing and mending became fashionable (rather than just practical) with the "hippy" movement. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, and Mend 🙂

    —Sarah Silk on June 28, 2018
  • I can sew a running stitch like nobody’s business, and refresher in embroidery will have me ready to go.

    —Marcia on June 28, 2018
  • I grew up in the 70’s and had a pair of overalls I embroidered. I actually still have them. This reminds me so much of that time in creating. Love it! My daughter and granddaughters now love the look and stitching.

    —Pam on June 28, 2018
  • Up until seeing this review and the photos in the book, I would have said NO to mending. But now, I’d love to try the ideas in this book. Gorgeous mends!

    —LynneP on June 28, 2018
  • I have always tried to mend things invisibly until the last year when I
    started doing Sashiko and Boro stitching.
    It has made me appreciate the value of celebrating
    frugality with beauty.

    —Debbie on June 28, 2018
  • I am up on most of the techniques, just never thought to use them this way! Love it and there are many ways to use it too! Great book, thank you.

    —judys on June 28, 2018
  • Embroidery

    —Linda Gerig on June 28, 2018
  • I can sew a running stitch, some great ideas here

    —Jayne P on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!

    —Sharon Browne on June 29, 2018
  • I’m ready to mend! What a great book!

    —Louise on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above for the past 60 years but the object was always to make the mend as invisible as possible. The idea of making it obvious has never occurred to me. I’d love to see what this book has to offer.

    —Peg G. on June 29, 2018
  • I have a degree in Art, so am a very creative quilter. This particular way of thinking meshes well with a free-style type of stitching.

    —S. Lynn Young on June 29, 2018
  • Love the idea. The book wiuld give inspiration and help to learn new techniques .

    —LizAnn Lizotte on June 29, 2018
  • Running stitches. I think visible mending is so clever! It like pop-up art!

    —Ginna on June 29, 2018
  • I don’t know that much about mending but would like to learn it all! Have a great day!! angielovesgary2 atgmail dotcom

    —Angela J Short on June 29, 2018
  • I’ve patched, mended, stitched, darned through the years, but never with such beautiful creativity as Jenny demonstrates. I would love this book.

    —Linda M on June 29, 2018
  • I love this look! I’ve done a lot of mending and a little patching but would love to learn these techniques. I have a pile of table linens, some of them vintage, that I would like to restore with embroidery. Thanks for the giveaway!

    —Gloria on June 29, 2018
  • I love this idea of visible mending and I can do a running stitch like nobody’s business. All of the photos are great!

    —Sue Smith on June 29, 2018
  • Just yesterday my 11 year old granddaughter sent me a picture of her ‘baby blanket’ that is in need of more repair than possible to save it. However, I told her to keep it and we will give it a new life. I’m pretty sure this book will help us decide on just what that new life might be.

    Luann Fischer on June 29, 2018
  • I didn’t learn to embroider as a child so this is quite new to me. It looks like fun and very useful!

    —Renée Welton on June 29, 2018
  • Never thought to cover stains on the tablecloth with embroidery! I am off to get my needle. Thanks

    —Fran on June 29, 2018
  • Sewing is my super power! I would love to get this book for my daughter who is an environmentally concerned thrift shop junked.

    —Kathy R on June 29, 2018
  • Patches and embroidery are old friends, but this concept is a fresh one. Would love to win this book.

    —Kathleen on June 29, 2018
  • Yeeks…did a stitching spy see the pile of mending on the table by my sewing machine?? LOL I can do all those techniques, but rather quilt, thus a stack of mending has ensued. This is inspirational to get me started ! Thank you.

    Marta on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!
    I love all types of handwork

    —Sue on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above. I am in the process of fixing my stack of in good condition but never wear jeans. Some are flair legs which are getting surged off to straight legs. Others fit great for about 30 minutes of wear and then the waist stretches and the rear sags so, fixing the waist on those. Will have about 8 "new" pairs of jeans once I’m done. Have not done visible mending but would like to give it a try.

    —Cindy K on June 29, 2018
  • I have quilting skills, but never applied it to mending and patches. I have a few pairs of jeans that may last longer if I start patching them. Also, I like the designs just as a decorative look. A lot of possibilities with the suggestions in this book. Thank you so much for this giveaway.

    —Virginia Bronner on June 29, 2018
  • Did this all the time in the early 70’s. Use applique definitely.

    —Sandra Boff on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!

    —Donna W on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above. Hate thinking of all the things I threw out that could have been saved. My motherinlaw used to do this.

    —Louise on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above! I’ve completed a boro table runner and loved every moment that I worked on it. I’m ready for more patches and embroidery!

    —Barbaraben on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above – I’m big on creative recycling.

    —Pat Dies on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above. Have some great ideas from this inspiration.

    —Teri on June 29, 2018
  • This looks like such a fun book! I can do a runnng stitch and some embroidery stitches.

    —Becky S on June 29, 2018
  • I have used embroidery and patches, both simple and decorative, in mending. And they are so popular right now. Looks like fun.

    —sam on June 29, 2018
  • I’ve done some patching in my day, but WOW I just love the looks of all these samples!

    —Betsy on June 29, 2018
  • I don’t have to look far to find items to mend, now to get inspiration from this clever book!

    —Glenna Denman on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work—I’m ready to mend!

    —Cindy S on June 29, 2018
  • Back in the 60’s/70’s we patched all our jeans. embellishing them with embroidery. I love the inspiration.

    —Elaine Litton on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above: patches, embroidery, darning, machine work. What I haven’t done is all the cool creative ideas Jenny incorporated with her ‘mends’. Would love to learn them through her book. Thanks!

    —Marie Eddins on June 29, 2018
  • I have mended and patched for years but not as decorative as shown.
    What a great idea!

    Joyce on June 29, 2018
  • Like many others — I have been mending things for years.
    This book would bring some new ideas and that would be most
    welcome.

    —Dorothy M on June 29, 2018
  • LOVE-LUV her ideas.
    My business is mending, restoring and making something out of "nothing" quilts for people. These last 2 years I’ve made several MEMORY bears and other items for people out of clothes, jeans, sweaters quilts and blankets. I’d love a way to write and do a book of "MORE" of the" mending and making". Do you have advice for me in that area?
    Thanks, Elizabeth

    Hi Elizabeth, if you’d like to submit a book proposal, I have a link for you! You can download Martingale’s proposal packet here. –Jenny

    —Elizabeth Schnelle on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above – but I need more practice, never thought of visible patches before, love the idea.

    —Judy B on June 29, 2018
  • I have been quilting, sewing, crewel embroidering, and mending for most of my almost-seventy years. Nearly every visit from a grandchild brings a stuffed animal needing a mend, a skirt that doesn’t quite look ‘cool’ any more, or a dollie bib with the lace ripping off.

    In addition, I have been trying to figure out how to salvage my favorite old jacquard jacket. Both sleeves have worn through the patches, the bottom hem is fraying, and the pockets are falling off. I have recently considered sending it to a thrift shop in hopes that a millennial will love it as much as I do, and wear it for it’s shabby-chic appeal. Now I don’t have to give it up as a rag.

    This book would be worth it’s weight in happy faces, not to mention my joy at saving my favorite jacket.

    What a wonderful way to inspire happy faces, Colleen – thank you for sharing your mending story! –Jenny

    —Colleen Ancel on June 29, 2018
  • I’ve mended jeans, pants, socks, skirts, curtains, pillows, cushions, etc. over the years and patched a few things too. Thanks for the chance to win!

    —Mary on June 29, 2018
  • The book looks very interesting. Would love to try some of the stitches.

    —Sylvia on June 29, 2018
  • I have mended for years, usually by machine. Love Sachiko, and this looks so much like it. Would love to have this book. Have had more than 40 foster children, and would love to "jazz up" mending, using all my craft skills. The samples are beautiful.

    —Karen Bryant on June 29, 2018
  • Have done mending most of my life. This is beautiful! Have had my kids, grandkids, foster kids..all kinds and extents of mending. Love this book and all the ideas. I have used patches, embroidery, little quilt squares, applique etc. These are classy. I’m dying to try some.

    —Karen B. on June 29, 2018
  • I am ready to mend. I know all about these methods. Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Renea Yarolim on June 29, 2018
  • I’ve read about the Japanese boro stitching. Would love to learn how.

    —Linda Ahn on June 29, 2018
  • It’s nice to know that mending is back, maybe it never left! Thank you for the opportunity to obtain this informative book!

    —Carmen Rowan on June 29, 2018
  • I have just started to machine mend and would love to expand my skills.

    —Laurel Curnyn on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above! Looks like a great book.

    —Ola Norman on June 29, 2018
  • I know all about mending. First with my two children and now with my grandson, not to mention mending for my husband and myself. What beautiful photos! Fingers crossed for the win!

    Thanks for a chance to play.

    —usairdoll on June 29, 2018
  • Patches and machine mending are what I’m used to doing. I’m interested in trying other techniques!

    —Kris B on June 29, 2018
  • All of the above. I love the idea of mending favorite items of clothing with decorative stitches and patches

    —Jo Barr on June 29, 2018
  • I am not a quilter, so I have no skills in that area. Although, I’m a knitter and crocheter, so I have some skills in whip stitching and the mattress stitch. I have all sorts of things that need to be mended. It looks like this book would give me the inspiration and motivation that I need to get them done.

    —Carole Jones on June 29, 2018
  • I can mend my husband’s jeans so he can wear them around the house.

    —Gail on June 29, 2018
  • I have also mended and embroidered for years. Making mending an art form is a brilliant idea!

    —Kit on June 29, 2018
  • Amazing, beautiful mending! Used to do jeans with appliqués or fancy patches years ago and would love to try these new-to-me ideas!

    —Carol on June 30, 2018
  • I’ve been teaching summer camp for years.This year’s we’re doing more recycling and mending.Im teachin the kids to decorate what they love to keep for a long time.From stuffies to pillows
    Thx for the opportunity to win your wonderful book.The kids will love to look thru it for inspirations!

    —Maryse VaillancourtPrescott on June 30, 2018
  • I enjoy all of these techniques for mending and think it’s a great idea!

    —Susan Morrison on June 30, 2018
  • At the age of 6, I decided to fix the holes in my dad’s socks. The only stitch I knew was a running stitch, so I carefully stitched around the hole……..and drew it up tightly. Voila! The hole was gone……’here, Daddy, I mended your sock!" I was crushed when he said that he liked Mom’s way of doing it better. That was when I realized that I had to learn some new techniques, and I’m still learning.

    —Peggi on June 30, 2018
  • When my sons were small I used several of these techniques. would love to see new and fun variations.

    —Karen on June 30, 2018
  • The last thing I mended was a pair of jeans, by just sewing over the hole and making the mend with thread. I could use some ideas!

    —Linda Cejnar on June 30, 2018
  • Wow, fashion really is cyclical. Back in the 70’s, I treasured a pair of baby blue bell bottom jeans with my name spelled out in patches down one of the legs. My hubby has a pair of yard work blue jeans I call his "Frankenjeans" because I keep patching, reinforcing and layering fabric onto them because he will not get rid of them! I love the idea of using the patches and repairs as a showcase.

    —Shawn Sumrall on June 30, 2018
  • My grand Mother taught me to embroider, Mother taught me to crochet
    & sewing, we also had to make do with items we had, thanks for the chance
    To win a copy of this book, it would be my go to book.

    —Charlie on July 1, 2018
  • I’ve been patching jeans for years with the patch visible behind the rip. It’s fiddly, but worth it! And I’ve been thinking about darning wee eyelets for those tiny holes that inevitably appear in many clothes, but something held me back, saying that it’s wrong. THANK YOU for showing me that it’s totally okay! And I’ll definitely try the boro stitching, it looks so good.

    —Mary on July 1, 2018
  • I’m a mender from ‘way back, but don’t ask my sons about my skill level. It was not pretty, to say the least, but it was practical. Thank you again for another generous giveaway.

    —bookboxer on July 2, 2018
  • I know many of these techniques. But in the past, my intent was to make mending invisible. This would be a whole other creative outlet for me!

    —Linda Towers on July 4, 2018
  • What a great idea! I have a great running stitch expertise 😊

    —Martha Cook on July 5, 2018
  • I do alterations. Love this creative way to mend.

    —Sally on July 6, 2018
  • so youthful

    —Lorie McAnelly on July 13, 2018
  • I have a pair of practically new jeans that have a hole on the top of the thigh. I had thought of patching them, but just hadn’t. There are such clever ideas for patches in the book. I can’t wait to try one of them.

    —Sue Webb on April 17, 2019

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