Circles and curves? Now they’re no sweat (+ fabric giveaway!)

Quilt blocks from Simple Circles and Quick Curves

Quilts from Simple Circles and Quick CurvesCircle quilts can be so inspiring to look at—and so insufferable to stitch! Leave it to quilting powerhouse Nancy Mahoney to come up with an easy approach to this intimidating task. In her new book Simple Circles and Quick Curves, Nancy’s approach looks like patchwork, but it’s all a beautiful illusion from a seasoned quilter who knows her way around a needle and thread.

VIDEO: See Nancy’s smart tip for centering circles

In addition to writing more than a dozen books with Martingale, Nancy’s quilts have been featured in more than 100 magazines. She’s created more than 75 patterns for fabric companies. And she’s designed over a dozen fabric collections with P&B Textiles (including her latest, “Urban Classics”—see below). If you want to know how to make a quilt, Nancy’s more than qualified to show you how!

We’re thrilled to have Nancy here today to tell you more about her latest love—circle quilts. If you’ve tried piecing circles and curves without success, heed Nancy’s advice: appliqué those arcs, bends, and bows by machine. Her method for making circles and curves is easier than piecing, quicker than hand appliqué, and most importantly, headache free. Tell us more, Nancy!


FABRIC GIVEAWAY ALERT! Our friends at P&B Textiles have generously donated a stack of fabrics from Nancy’s latest line, “Urban Classics,” to give away to you! It’s so hot off the press, it’ll be shipped to the winner right from P&B headquarters. Here’s a peek:

Nancy Mahoney's Urban Classics fabric line for P&B Textiles

Find out how you can win the fabric AND Nancy’s latest book at the bottom of this post.


Nancy MahoneyI’m delighted to tell you about my thirteenth book with Martingale, Simple Circles and Quick Curves. For this book I created scrappy quilts featuring beautiful curved-appliqué designs. I’ve been fascinated with curves and circles in quilts since I started quilting in the mid-1970s. I’m intrigued by the variety of designs that can be created with arcs, quarter-circles, and circles. I love how curves, or segments of circles, can be connected and arranged in various ways to create design elements in quilts. Curves add wonderful movement to a quilt design.

However, the downside for most quilters, including myself, is piecing those curves. For some of us, piecing curves is pure agony. Just the thought is enough for me to break out the chocolate! Then one day, I realized I didn’t have to piece the curves…I could appliqué them! Just think of the possibilities!

On the other hand, I wanted that appliqué trick to be my little secret. So I looked for an easy, time-efficient, cost-effective way to achieve the look of patchwork using appliqué. My solution was starch appliqué, using heat-resistant plastic templates (which can be used over and over), invisible thread, and a tiny machine blanket stitch. Violà! The desired results without all the headaches!

Blue Bayou quilt
“Blue Bayou”

If you have an aversion to using invisible thread, you can use matching thread and a decorative stitch. Or, if you want a take-along project, you can hand appliqué the curved edges. “Passion Vine” and “Sugar Plums” incorporate fusible appliqué, and I’ve included instructions for my fusible-appliqué method in the book.

Passion Vine quilt
“Passion Vine”


Sugar Plums quilt
“Sugar Plums”

You can use this method for appliquéing all of the curved pieces, especially if you are making a child’s quilt or a baby quilt. Although I encourage you to try my starch-appliqué method, I also want you to use the appliqué technique that works best for YOU.

Lots of Dots quilt
“Lots of Dots” makes a darling baby quilt!

All of the quilts in Simple Circles and Quick Curves are lap size, which I’ve come to realize is just the right size. They can be displayed on a wall, draped over a sofa, or cuddled under. Best of all, because of their size, lap quilts take less time to make. I love integrating traditional designs with bright colors and modern aesthetics, but don’t feel you have to use the same colors as I did. It’s your quilt and you can use any colors you like!

Sun Spots quilt
“Sun Spots”

As I travel the country to teach and lecture, I’m often asked how much I buy of a given fabric. Honestly, there isn’t a one-size-fits-all answer and my buying habits have changed over the years. Years ago, when fat quarters were first introduced to quilters, I thought they were the perfect size. I could have a little bit of lots of different fabrics—they were simply irresistible! Then, somewhere along the way, I didn’t think fat quarters were big enough. What if I needed more of a specific fabric or I wanted to use it for a border? So, I started buying a half yard, one yard, two yards, or more of each fabric. Can you see where this is going? I was one step from being a hoarder! I had more fabric than I could use in two lifetimes. So, I gave away the fabrics that no longer appealed to me and got my fabric stash under control. Now, I’m in love with fat quarters, again, and fat eighths are so charming. After all, scrap quilts only need little bits of fabric.

Star Rubies quilt
“Star Rubies”

So, you could say I’ve come full circle. Simple Circles and Quick Curves is filled with things I adore—scrappy lap quilts with lots of curves and circles. I hope these quilts will inspire you to dive into your fabric stash and start stitching!


Simple Circles and Quick CurvesNancy, thanks for being here to share a peek into your 13th book. We’re already curious about what cool quilts you’ll be dreaming up for #14!

How do you typically sew circles and curves into your quilts—or have you been too timid to try? Leave your answer in the comments and you could win a copy of Simple Circles and Quick Curves PLUS a gorgeous bundle of Nancy’s new “Urban Classics” fabric from our friends at P&B Textiles! We’ll choose a winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win. Good luck!

Comments are closed for this post.

Thanks to all who entered the drawing! The randomly chosen winner is Bonnie, who writes:

“I definitely fall on the timid side. My piecing has never strayed from straight lines. Nancy’s technique sure looks doable though. Love that new fabric!”

Bonnie, we’ll email you about your prize. Congratulations!


Watch Nancy’s video “How to applique circles by machine: quick tip” on YouTube


559 Comments

  • I like to sew the circle to a lightweight fusible interfacing, right side of fabric to glue side of interfacing; sew completely closed. Cut a slit in the center of the interfacing, turn, roll/finger press edges, and fuse the circle to the quilt top/block fabric. Faux needleturn applique technique from 35 years ago.

    —Mary Val on November 21, 2013
  • I love doing machine applique for circles and curves, so I’m very excited about this book! Thanks for the fabulous giveaway!

    Choly Knight on November 21, 2013
  • The patterns in Nancy’s new book look wonderful! I love the colors in Urban Classics. I’ve never sewn curves, but Nancy’s technique makes it look easy. Thanks for the chance to win a copy of the book and fabric!

    —Deb G in VA on November 21, 2013
  • Slowly and by machine. Sorry, no hand stitching for me if it can be avoided, haha…

    —Jan on November 21, 2013
  • What a great way to center a circle on a square….thanks Nancy. Your new fabric line looks beautiful! I, too, use glue to sew circles. So much easier and accurate.

    —Connie on November 21, 2013
  • I’m to timid to try this.

    —Becky on November 21, 2013
  • I have done full circles where the circle is 1/4″ bigger than the hole and you basically match it up and sew it around–essentially piecing but the whole circle. Doesn’t work well for small, tiny circles. Have tried many ways of doing circles and this works best for me.
    Love the fabric collection and the various circle quilts

    —Nancy R on November 21, 2013
  • I don’t do circles because they terrify me. If I don’t win this book, I’ll certainly be buying it! Thank you for making something I find intimidating accessible to me!

    —Billye on November 21, 2013
  • Have avoided doing curves and circles. Would love to learn the secret!! Thanks for sharing!

    —Sally King on November 21, 2013
  • I have always just fused them down. I have not had good success with curved piecing. This looks like something to try!!

    —Cheryl V. on November 21, 2013
  • I piece my circles/curves. I love the way they look when they are pieced. I find that my applique work never looks very good. Probably just need to practice more.

    Anya on November 21, 2013
  • I have done circles/curves in the past, acceptably but certainly not great. I would love to learn more and give it a try again. What fun fabrics, by the way! Thanks for the opportunity to enter the give-a-way.

    —Barbara Rabinowitz on November 21, 2013
  • Too timid to try, so far, but I very much want to learn!

    —Lonormi Manuel on November 21, 2013
  • What a neat idea, I will be making some circles!

    Patricia Weldon on November 21, 2013
  • I have to admit that I have never (yet) used circles in a quilt. But, I have found a few cute patterns that I will try out. I probably will add them on by appliquè, if I don’t get daring enough to do it the way Nancy does.

    Anita on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve sewn circles using lots of pins. Thanks for the chance to win!

    Sallie on November 21, 2013
  • Thank you for the video, I just learned something new and I’m so excited! I have appliqued circles before using a satin stitch on the raw edges. This new book has stunning quilts in it and I would love to learn how Nancy does her circles. Thank you for the opportunity to win this wonderful giveaway 🙂

    —Wanda Heath on November 21, 2013
  • I typically use fusible web, and then satin stitch over the edge. Looks ok, but your method would be so much nicer.

    —Mary Cunningham on November 21, 2013
  • I definitely fall on the timid side. My piecing has never strayed from straight lines. Nancy’s technique sure looks doable though. Love that new fabric!

    Bonnie on November 21, 2013
  • I have either used the freezer paper method of hand applique or a sewing machine clip-and-ease sewing method for a drunkard’s path easy curve.

    —Barbara Pricola on November 21, 2013
  • I like to add some circles with machine applique, and embellish with hand embroidery.

    Deci MacKinnon on November 21, 2013
  • I have been avoiding circles, as I’m a newer quilter. I’m loving these quilts though, so I may need to learn.

    —Cindy Dahlgren on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done much – a bit of fusible and button stitch. Love the projects in this book and the pretty fabric!

    —Lynda Parker on November 21, 2013
  • I generally don’t sew curves or circles on my quilts so would love to have this book (and, of course, the fabrics)
    thanks!

    —Linda Erickson on November 21, 2013
  • I don’t have a typical way but I need this book so for sure I will get this one even if I don’t win a copy. The fabric is wonderful, who wouldn’t like winning it?

    —Chris on November 21, 2013
  • If the circles are large enough, I do the piecelique technique, if smaller, I usually hand applique. I don’t think I am familiar with Nancy’s technique, but I am always willing to learn something new!

    —Janet T on November 21, 2013
  • The last time I sewed curves was when I made a double wedding ring quilt as a gift for newly weds! I was hesitant at first, but they just came together and the quilt turned out beautifully!

    Kathy on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve quilted for years but the only circles I’ve done were fusible applique with blanket stitch, and a frayed-edge bullseye pattern.
    Would love to learn Nancy’s easy methods and try them out! Thanks for the chance to win her book and beautiful fabrics!!

    —KrisTX on November 21, 2013
  • I usually just do a machine applique around the circles.

    —Anita Bydlowski on November 21, 2013
  • Gorgeous quilts Nancy and that fabric is exactly my style. Congratulations! I have done curves and LOVE them but for the most part shy away. I love circles so I still work with them. I use heat resistant template plastic, baste around the edge, pull to form around the template circle, and iron — them remove the plastic circle. I believe that not everything is intended to be perfect so my circles aren’t either. :o)

    Stephanie Dunphy on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve never tried circles before, but I would give this a try. It sounds so easy that I think I cold do it.

    —Mary on November 21, 2013
  • If I sew curves, I roll the fabric from a bias fold. Most of the time, I avoid them.

    —mary on November 21, 2013
  • I have made several "circular quilts, even used to fashion a jacket, but I would love to try Nancy’s methods. I am unable to purchase at this time as recent events have left me tight in the quilting budget, but fortunately I purchased fabric ahead as a bank account for just such a time. Help me use my stash in some new and exciting ways.

    —peg sullivan on November 21, 2013
  • Too timid to try, but I would love to learn how!

    —Allison Rehor on November 21, 2013
  • I machine turned edge applique with a very small zigzag stitch with invisible thread or I do inset circles if I’m piecing them. Love the Passion Vine quilt! Thanks for the chance to win!

    —Janet Frank on November 21, 2013
  • I love to do circles but always piece them, looking forward to trying this method.

    —Jody on November 21, 2013
  • I use Perfect circles to create circles – either by gathering seam allowance over them and starching, then hand applique or machine applique

    —Dee on November 21, 2013
  • I have pieced curves a few times on blocks like NY Beauty. I have also sometimes appliqued circles by hand or by machine. But I haven’t done any of these things very often. Nancy’s quilts are so creative and look so beautiful that it makes me want to do some circle quilts myself.

    —Lisa Marie on November 21, 2013
  • for some reson in doing primitive quilts i never had to do a circle, perhaps i was secretly advoiding them. I would love to have a few tips on how to do a circle. Thanks for the chance to win

    debra on November 21, 2013
  • I like to sew down on a square with machine and them apply to quilt top I am working on

    —Dorothy Rowzee on November 21, 2013
  • I’m comfortable with both hand and machine applique and machine piecing. This book was made for me?

    —Jackie on November 21, 2013
  • I’m SO drawn to circles, but haven’t taken the time to dive in yet. I’m an impatient seamstress, so straight lines are friendly to pedal-to-the-metal ways!

    —Lauren on November 21, 2013
  • I am intimidated by circles so I can use all the help I can get. Thanks for having this giveaway.

    —Ann Dunn on November 21, 2013
  • Too timid to try (so far). But would love to learn. What beautiful inspiration! Thank you for the contest!

    —Teresa S on November 21, 2013
  • My curves are usually a paper piece pattern. When they are the drunkard’s path I will pin them a sew pretty easy

    —Beth Kobiske on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t made any small circles yet. I made a large circle quilt for my son and just used lots of pins! I’m a little intimidated by the smaller circles, but I love the way they look!

    —Holly Colvin on November 21, 2013
  • I have pieced and hand appliqued curves and circles. I enjoy circles. Thank you for the chance to win such beautiful fabric. I can imagine using it in my quilts!

    —Sherill V on November 21, 2013
  • The circles or curves I’ve done are hand or machine applique. Would love to learn Nancy’s technique. The fabrics are fun – would love to use them in a quilt with circles!

    —Terri on November 21, 2013
  • The very first quilt project I ever did was a double wedding ring table runner. All pieces cut and sewn by hand. Guess what! It has taken 25 years to be willing to try quilting and sewing again. So I would LOVE anything available to help me overcome my fear of curves and circles!

    —Gaye Mathusek on November 21, 2013
  • Looks like i need to try

    —Denise on November 21, 2013
  • The only way I’ve attached circles is by appliquing using a satin stitch. Haven’t tried it any other ways yet!

    —Michelle Smith on November 21, 2013
  • I have only done a few quilts with curves. I pieced them but they were very small with very few curves. Nancy’s method looks very interesting and I love the quilts in the book.

    —Susan Griffith on November 21, 2013
  • Oh !! Oh !! I want that light, bright, summery fabric. And make it up in circles? The absolute perfect antidote for winter’s grey skies.

    —Ina Anderson on November 21, 2013
  • Tackled a circle quilt – quite happy with the outcome. Tried several different methods, and found that it was easier to use fusible web and machine stitch around the edge.

    —Shirley on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve pretty muc afraid to do circles! I did do a drunkards path quilt that came out quite nice and i do love that quilt. But i still tend to shy away from circles.

    —Sandy Ruffino on November 21, 2013
  • Ack! Circles? Not I! They are definitely intimidating. I tried to sew a curved piece for my dear jane and wound up doing an applique stitch in the end! The patterns in the book are seriously cute though. Would love to try them!

    —Ruth Anglin on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve been apprehensive about curves but have done it a few times. I’ve appliqued by hand and pieced but have not found that magic, I-have-confidence method yet.

    CathyMcMann on November 21, 2013
  • Circles add so much to the usual straight line geometrics of our quilts…..

    —Suzanna on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done circles. I’m OK with straight lines. And am working on quilts for my family. Am very interested in this technique.

    —Margaret Bingham on November 21, 2013
  • I have added circles to quilts using the fusible web method, freezer paper method, and by machine applique. I like the look of circles in a quilt.

    —Rebecca on November 21, 2013
  • I am really new to quilting, and while I love the look of circles and curves, I am way to nervous to try them as of yet. Maybe with Nancy’s technique I will be able to venture out of my comfort zone and into a whole new world of quilting.

    —Alex Unander on November 21, 2013
  • The only way I have ever sewn circles in a quilt is using interfacing and applique(machine or hand).

    —Holly on November 21, 2013
  • I would love to try circles, but so far have been intimidated.

    —Cheryl on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done any circles, they really scare me. I just need to bite the bullet and do it.

    —Sandy K on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve only ever appliqued circles by machine. I would love to do more circle quilts. Love that Star Rubies quilt! Thanks for the opportunity to win!

    —Sandy N on November 21, 2013
  • I have appliquéd them by sewing fusible interfacing to the right side of my circles, slitting facing and turning inside out, trimming interfacing to 1/4″ and then pressing circle to quilt. I top stitch circles down during quilting process.

    —Linda Johnson on November 21, 2013
  • I have admired circle quilts but have not gotten my nerve up to try one.Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Elaine on November 21, 2013
  • I rarely do circles (just call me chicken), but have done a few via needle turn appliqué….gorgeous quilts! I may need to face my fear….
    chendryx(at)nctv(dot)com

    —Connie Hendryx on November 21, 2013
  • I have been too afraid to try this but would love to have a book with instructions and I might give it a try.

    —CHRIS on November 21, 2013
  • My circles look far more attractive from a distance – what great looking quilts – LOVE the movement in Star Rubies. Thanks for the chance to win a copy of this book, it just may allow folks to comment up close and personal!

    —Deb Marshall on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve never tried to do circles but WOW – they look fabulous! I love the quilt pictures shown and have a bunch of favorites that I’d like to try!!

    —Sandi Martin on November 21, 2013
  • I made a Drunkards Path quilt many years ago and I think did a pretty good job on it. Normally I shy away from circles and curves. I love the fabrics. Thanks for the chance.

    —Vicki H on November 21, 2013
  • I must confess…I have been too timid! Usually I just fuse
    and then use a machine blanket stitch to secure. Will definitely
    look for easier methods to tackle curves!!! Thanks and best of luck with the book and fabric line!

    —Patty Hammond on November 21, 2013
  • Nancy’s quilts are gorgeous. I haven’t tried quilting with curves or even doing applique yet. Both are on my list of techniques to learn. Thanks for the chance to win.

    —Joyce Mitchell on November 21, 2013
  • I have never tried. Though so pretty, I’ve always felt they were too difficult. Maybe I need a book ( wink, wink )

    —Karen on November 21, 2013
  • I use the Curves Foot for my circles. It works great, but I really want to try Nancy’s method. Especially with that fun fabric!

    —Sue Gallagher on November 21, 2013
  • So far my only circles and curves have been in the quilting, not in the piecing. Still need to expand my horizons!

    —Susan Stefun on November 21, 2013
  • Circles scare me, I haven’t tried them yet. But might have to try using the lightweight fusible interfacing method.

    —Kim Waknitz on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve only tried once with the Drunkards Path block and by the time I finished I should have been bald. It was so frustrating. But I love the look of circles and curves in quilts so I’d really like to give it another try.

    —Valerie Hutchinson on November 21, 2013
  • I just learned to sew curves in the last year or so, and I do them the traditional way – with the concave curve on the top and I pin every inch or so. (unless it is a tight curve.)

    —Jaci E on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done much with circles, but do the interfacing method and fuse to the quilt top. Love the pictures of the quilts in this new book!

    —Kim on November 21, 2013
  • How wonderful this book is – I absolutely love Blue Bayou – can’t wait to see the book and drool over all the wonderful patterns/layouts. Thank you Nancy – you are the bestest !!!

    —Anne Esteve on November 21, 2013
  • I usually sew curved pieces using templates that I have my father cut for me out of plexiglass. They are more durable than plastic or cardboard. For circles I have usually used a fusible web and then stitched around the raw edges with a blanket stitch. New techniques are always so much fun and challenging to try.

    —Cyndi on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t worked with circles very much, so Nancy’s techniques sound great. I’ve been seeing quite a few circle quilts I would love to make. I really like the Lots of Dots quilt, so I will be adding Nancy’s book to my wishlist if I don’t win. Her fabric is beautiful as well.

    —Cecilia on November 21, 2013
  • I typically avoid sewing circles in my quilt making; I find them tedious and laborious; therefore, even though I like the look I avoid them. With little time in my life to sew I want the time to count; finding a new and easy way to sew circles and curves would be fabulous. I’m looking forward to exploring "Simple Circles and Quick Curves" quilt book.

    —Bonnie Dick on November 21, 2013
  • I have sewn circles with a blanket stitch but have never tried machine applique.

    —Colleen on November 21, 2013
  • I like to mix pieced blocks with applique so I am always trying to find patterns that bring out the best in my pieced blocks. I have done machine applique with matching or contrasting thread, depending on the look I want. I have also done needle turn applique and sewing fusible to the right side of my pieces, make a little slit and turn them inside out to create a very nice even, easy to applique edge. I would love to take a closer look and use the methods Nancy suggests in her new book. Looks like fun!

    —Pamela Zajicek on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve done pieced, set-in and appliqué circles – my favourite method is set-in, using the method I learned from Cheryl Arkison.

    Thank you for the fab giveaway!

    —Paula on November 21, 2013
  • I either avoid patterns with circles or I machine applique if there are not too many circles. I would like to learn a new technique.

    —Liz Dyer on November 21, 2013
  • Never done a circle quilt since I have not learned this skill, as of yet. Nancy new book would be great to learn this skill and be used often. Thank you for the chance to win this wonderful book and great fabric.

    —Cathie on November 21, 2013
  • I do curves I use silk needles they are great for sewing curves.

    —Evelyn on November 21, 2013
  • Machine applique is instant gratification with circles. Otherwise, I just try to remember that "baggy goes on the bottom" when stitching the curved sections. Patience is a big factor, too. Nancy’s new book looks very inviting.

    —T Wade on November 21, 2013
  • I get out my compass and fusible and go to work and fuse to a fabric to create circles. however I just purchased a curved ruler to sew curves and I really like it. I may adapt to circles and give it a try as fusibles are not the best on the machine or iron and you still have to tack them down. lots of work, so why not sew unless it is so unique to spend all that time??

    —diane on November 21, 2013
  • Far too scared to try! Circle piecing completely intimidates me, but I find this method intriguing….. 🙂
    Thanks for the opportunity!

    —Margaret C on November 21, 2013
  • guess I am a sucker for hand work since the 1st quilt I ever made by hand was a lap size Halloween drunkard’s path. I have done some small circle applique on the machine but not too successfully. I do like how they look but need to develop the skill.

    —Cindy Wienstroer on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve only done one small project with a method called "Applicurves". This looks like a good way to do it, too. I would love to have it. Thanks.

    —Marilyn S on November 21, 2013
  • I applique by using Kim Diehl’s invisible applique method, it’s simple to iron the edges over freezer paper and sew them down with a tiny zig-zag stitch!

    —Pat Peyton on November 21, 2013
  • Circles and curves along with zippers strike nervous anxiety in my and I haven’t attempted them.

    —Sheryl on November 21, 2013
  • I use the freezer paper to get the shape and help to keep it in place on the fabric. Then I take my time, and use as many pins as I have in my sewing kit. I sew it nice and slow working the fabric with my fingers. To make sure its centered I fold the appliqued piece in half and the fabric in half to get the center, then I put a pin up through the center of each and put the applique’d piece onto the pin, pull out the pin and lightly press the applique piece to the fabric to give it a very gentle hold.

    Charis Tompkins on November 21, 2013
  • I have tried several different techniques for curves, fusible interfacing, satin stitching, raw edge and turned, but the one in Nancy’s video is so wonderfully easy. Never thought of that one. I love her blocks and have several of her books. Would love to add this book to my collection. Any new technique I can learn to make quilting more accurate will definitely help me.

    —connie on November 21, 2013
  • Like riding the merry-go-round. I love them, but they make me dizzy thinking about using them. I want to do quilts with them, but keep hesitating. Would love to have new inspiration and ideas about a better way.

    —Pam B on November 21, 2013
  • I’m a rather new quilter and have only tackled circles using pre printed iron on backing to cut and sew the circles. The fabric collection is delightful and I’d love to win it. Thanks.

    —Judy Allen on November 21, 2013
  • What great colors for a spring quilt what a beautiful palate

    —Marcia Bergstrom on November 21, 2013
  • I love circular designs, but have been too chicken to try piecing them. I’m mainly a piecer, but am willing to branch out and try a little more applique!

    —Z Any Mouse on November 21, 2013
  • I think circles in quilts look amazing. But I feel too
    timid to try.
    Thanks.

    —Wendi M. on November 21, 2013
  • Typically, I don’t use a lot of curves or circles in my quilts. If I do, it sort of depends on my "mood" what method I use. I may treat it like a neck facing or may applique it down — usually by machine. Sometimes I may even hand applique it — many times it is determined by what kind of time frame I am working in. This book looks like it may encourage me to use circles more often.

    —Carol Sc on November 21, 2013
  • A few times I have attempted to piece curves, but they never turned out the way I thought they should. I have machine appliqued before, so I’ll never know why the thought of machine appliqueing a circle didn’t come to me before. I tend to be a quilting purist…so, thank you Nancy, for finally giving me permission to applique outside the rules!

    —Sandi Spence on November 21, 2013
  • Lots of pins to secure the curve. Thanks for a chnance to win.

    Karin på Ösäter on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve used fusible web for any curved appliqué. Especially for larger pieces I use the window method – which just gives a small border of fused fabric, then I finished the edge with satin stitch in a wonderful coordinating variable thread.
    Thank you for the giveaway – the book would be wonderful to have and I just love the range of geometric designs on the Urban Classics fabric.

    —Linda Fleming on November 21, 2013
  • I have not tried circle yet maybe soon.

    —Sabine on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve struggled with a New York Beauty and it’s curves, and I don’t know I’d ever want to do another one. I fought and fought with it. Recently I did a circle baby quilt, and appliqued all the circles down – I first made them reversible with fabric on the back, then turned them right side out, and pressed them. I then appliqued them down onto the quilt, using these stitches to quilt the blanket. No need to do a needle turn technique or any other applique method other than a blanket stitch!!

    —Susan Burney on November 21, 2013
  • Gorgeous fabrics! I’d love to use them to make a circle quilt (I particularly like Sunspots).

    Kim M on November 21, 2013
  • Wow, stunning quilts and Nancy makes it do-able! I’m tempted to give these a go… and what better fabrics than Nancy’s Urban Classics. Yum!

    —Pam W on November 21, 2013
  • I have made a ot of quilts with circles and curves – from Drunkard’s Path to Strips and Curves. I use the 3 pin method for sewing curves. For circles as Mary Val explained, I sew circle by fusing lightweight interfacing to the "right side of fabric to glue side of interfacing; sew completely closed. Cut a slit in the center of the interfacing, turn, roll/finger press edges, and fuse the circle to the quilt top/block fabric". This method works every time.

    —Jill on November 21, 2013
  • I’m embarrassed to say I’ve only done a quilt with circles once. And it didn’t turn out like I’d hoped so I gave up. I’ve made a lot of quilts but still avoid anything with circles or curves. Maybe it’s time to try again.

    —Barb on November 21, 2013
  • I have done some circles and usually very slow and carefully. The easiest for me have been by hand but the machine is faster but not as even as I prefer them to be.

    —Priscilla on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve only done it once with fusible and machine applique stitch. I could use some practice for sure!

    —Carol Vickers on November 21, 2013
  • Circles and applique in one technique — this would take me where I’ve been too intimidated to venture.

    —Tesuque on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t had much luck making circles Might just have to try again.

    Evelyn on November 21, 2013
  • I have been looking for a lap size quilt to make for a thank you gift plus I have been wanting to learn to do circles for a long time but have been intimidated UNTIL NOW. I will be adding this book to my wish list.

    —Pam Duren on November 21, 2013
  • I’m a beginning quilter and would love to learn this technique.

    —Kathleen Kurdziel on November 21, 2013
  • I have never pieced circles, but have used circles when hand quilting. They give nice movement to the quilt.

    Nita on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve only done circles once and they were made with a raw edge and stacked, three different sizes sewn on top of each other then sewn on a square. Circles do seem to be popular right now and the fabric for the give-away is very modern looking. Thanks for doing this.

    —Karen L. on November 21, 2013
  • The video really helped to center the circle. Looked like you book would be a nice technique to try.

    —Lauretta Reyes on November 21, 2013
  • I have not used circles in a quilt yet. I think this would be a great challenge in the near future.

    —Lois V on November 21, 2013
  • Most of the circles I use in quilts are small and hand appliqued using the freezer paper method.

    —Bonnie Goodrich on November 21, 2013
  • My all time favorite is pieced optical illusion. I just LOVE them. When I do the "real deal" circles, I hand baste and then use a very, very small blanket stitch with thread that matches or disappears on the circle fabric.

    —Marlene Clausen on November 21, 2013
  • I have done a modified drunkards path style block – with 1/4 circle curves in the corners -but that is all I have dared try … so far.

    —Regina on November 21, 2013
  • Been way to afraid. I’ve been keeping an eye on Nancy’s technique and think that maybe even I can sew curves and circles with her help. Thanks for a chance to win the book and allowing me to grow as a quilter.

    —Dorothy G on November 21, 2013
  • I don’t have any problem sewing curved seams in clothing construction, but I’ve never sewed curved seams in patchwork. I’ve done machine appliqué with circles on a quilt. I’d love to try a quilt from your creative book!

    —Karen Watkins on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t had the courage to try circles yet. Maybe this book would give me the inspiration to try and I love the new fabric, some of my favorite colors!

    —Stephanie on November 21, 2013
  • The few times I have tried circles I’ve had the most success with hand applique. Would love to try Nancy’s technique!

    —M Nichols on November 21, 2013
  • Love the prints and colors in Urban Classics. I have heavy plastic templates I use to cut Drunkards Path blocks and find they are not too difficult to sew the curves on my machine. Have not tried much in the way of applique circles.

    Anne on November 21, 2013
  • So far I have tried to avoid circles and curves but have found several patterns that I am wanting to try. One of my must do quilts is a Double Wedding Ring quilt. I am trying to find the right material for it right now.

    —Kemper on November 21, 2013
  • I had the opportunity to finish a Drunkard’s Path quilt my sister started, it has become her most prized possession. Other quilts of mine have included circles & curves – which I’ve either machine appliqued or machined stitched depending upon the size of the circle/curve and the overall desired appearance.

    —Dana on November 21, 2013
  • These quilts are so stunning. I am too timid to try this and would love to learn to use the technique and incorporate this in a quilt. The challenge of learning something new to increase my skills is something l would love to do. Maybe one day.

    —Anne on November 21, 2013
  • I have been exploring with curved pieces, in free form, quite a bit this past year. I love the look and flow of curved piecing.

    —Terri J on November 21, 2013
  • I usually use a template to make a circle, press it and hand applique it.

    —Jitka on November 21, 2013
  • I have not tried circles–always thought they were too hard to attempt, but your way looks wonderful–would love to win it! Thanks!

    —Rosalee on November 21, 2013
  • I have not sewn or even appliqued circles in a quilt. I’ve only sewn curves with a large apple core block.
    I’ve learned a lot from Nancy Mahoney’s YouTube videos and would be thrilled to win a copy of her new book as well as some terrific fabric!

    —Kathleen Dalecio on November 21, 2013
  • HELL,I’ve done applique circles.When I want FMQing circles I draw it one the fabric+stitch.Thanks for sharing a great giveaway!

    —LINDA on November 21, 2013
  • After quilting for more than 50 years, I must say I generally choose to skip the circles and curves. Well I will do a slight curve but, defintely skip the rest. This book sounds fun and easy. Thanks for the chance to win.

    —Janet Crossman on November 21, 2013
  • So far, I’ve been too timid to try the circles and curves. I bought the "ruler" and fabric and a pattern needed, but keep thinking I should try something little first, rather than a big quilt. I’ve watched video’s and they make it seem so simple, I guess I’m still "chicken." My plans for quilting 2014, first up is a jar style "I Spy" quilt for my great grandson.

    —Barb Satterfield on November 21, 2013
  • I think that quilted circles are absolutely beautiful- but I have never been bold enough to try any type of circle quilting myself. It really is a very intimidating technique for me!

    —Christa Dunn on November 21, 2013
  • Circles and curves are scary! I could really use some inspiration and help with these as I love the look.

    Terry SailingKnitter on November 21, 2013
  • I’m a new quilter so I pretty much have some kind of problem whenever I I quilt, still learning! Lol. I did try a couple of circles once, and it didn’t come out so well. I’m a little scared to try any more just yet.

    —Tabitha Keener on November 21, 2013
  • I have never done circles, don’t know why. I would love to have Nancy’s book and then would probably do a thing or two just to say I did and I could. Thanks

    Jeanne on November 21, 2013
  • The only circles I have done were hand applique. I’ve been wanting to do some curved piecing!

    Thanks for the chance to win.

    —diane on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve never tried but would love to learn how to piece curves. Thanks for the chance to win!!

    —Courtney Elwell on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve been afraid of circles, but I really should try them

    —Joyce on November 21, 2013
  • Wow! I have avoided circles with a passion but Nancy Mahoney encourages an interest to try them out with her book. What a great bonus it would be to win a copy.

    —Jan on November 21, 2013
  • I love circles. I’ve only just started using circles in muiniquilts but want to do a bed size quilt and need to get up the courage. Drunkard path slowly by machine without pins is my method so far.

    —Dorothy S. on November 21, 2013
  • I am too chicken to try, but am willing to give it a shot

    —Charlette Smith on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t sewn any circles, but I have sewn curves as in Drunkard’s Path and in doing hand applique.

    —Susan on November 21, 2013
  • Oh – very timid – I might just hand embroider a few here and there – but I do not use the sewing machine for fear of jagged circles. This book could be an inspiration and
    boost to get me there!! Thanks for the chance.

    —Jane from MA on November 21, 2013
  • Have always avoided circles and stuck to straight lines. nancy’s quilts and method definitely inspire me to try.

    —Rivka Hamdani on November 21, 2013
  • I have pieced circles before and done drunkards path, but watching your video made me want to try to appliqué them like you showed. I will have to get your book. I love your quilts in it. I also really love your new fabric.

    —Karen J on November 21, 2013
  • I am very new to quilting so I have not tried the circles yet. I did buy a circle ruler to cut different size circles but have not used it yet. I would love a copy of this book so that I won’t be so afraid to try to do one of these quilts.

    —Debbie on November 21, 2013
  • The only quilt that I have made with circles, I machine appliqued the circles onto the quilt top. It was interesting to do and I am very happy with the results. Would like to learn new methods to do quilts with circles because it makes an interesting top instead of doing all squares and triangles.

    —Isobel on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t tried piecing curves yet, but I’m looking forward to it. I just need to finish a few of my current projects first. I definitely experience the ‘problem’ of "too many quilts, not enough time," but I’d much rather have it that way than the opposite!

    Meredith Miller on November 21, 2013
  • So far I’ve not tried a quilt that has arcs. I’m rather stubbornly old-fashioned and would probably do it by piecing the curves. At least once. Having sewn clothing since I was seven, curves don’t really scare me (think armholes and neck facings, trimming and clipping curves). H-m-m, applique is sounding better all the time.

    —Martha on November 21, 2013
  • I have not done tried a circle quilt. The photos and information make it sound so easy. Looking forward to winning and if not a winner plan to add this to my to do list.

    —Olga Castillo on November 21, 2013
  • I have never tried circles or curves but this is definitely try if I win Nancy’s book and if I don’t I will definitely buy it. Thanks for this wonderful opportunity for fabric and Nancy’s book

    —Yalana on November 21, 2013
  • I made a drunkard’s path wall hanging and pieced it on the machine. It was a slow process and my seam ripper got a good workout! Nancy’s book looks great and the Urban Classics fabrics are like a breath of fresh air!

    —Kaye M. on November 21, 2013
  • I love adding circles to a quilt with my circular attachment for my machine. Great new ideas. Thanks for the video! I really like the new fabrics.

    —Wilma Al-Uqdah on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve never been brave enough to use circles. I’ve only been quilting since April, and I’m still using pretty basic patterns. Circles are on my list of things to learn!

    —Dawn on November 21, 2013
  • I love the pattern "Robbing Peter to Pay Paul". It was also my grandmother’s favorite–she called it "Crooked Road to Texas". Any time I am piecing it, I feel more comfortable basting the curved line before sewing. I have tried pinning ends and center of line, but somehow don’t do well with that. If am piecing many blocks, it is VERY time consuming and often the result makes me want to use some crazy quilt stitching over the lines.

    —Faith Briggs on November 21, 2013
  • Yes, I am too timid to try! Will I in the future? Who Knows.

    —Mari Elliott on November 21, 2013
  • I just discovered my favorite way of making circles is by using coffee filters. Paper piecing is my preferred method of quilting – so I still get my fix using filters.

    —Deb Sturek on November 21, 2013
  • The quilt I made with circles had you machine applique them to the background fabric & then cut away the excess fabric. I would like to try a New York Beauty block since that is paper piecing and curved seams.

    —Julie B on November 21, 2013
  • I have not made alot of quilts with circles, but in the past I have used machine applique. Nancy’s quilts are beautiful and it would be fun to try some new techniques.

    —Susan on November 21, 2013
  • I have just discovered my favorite way to make circles is by using coffee filters. Paper piecing is my preferred method of quilting – so I still get my paper fix.

    —Deb Sturek on November 21, 2013
  • My circles look more like squares. As well, I would love to make an Orange Peel quilt but have never tried curves so I really need to get this book to learn the correct methods.

    —Elizabeth on November 21, 2013
  • I will admit to being afraid of circles – I don’t enjoy hand applique, and my machine applique skills are minimal. I might just have to try this technique though

    —Liz Tamiso on November 21, 2013
  • I like to sew my circles to DoSew, slit the interfacing and then turn them right sides out and press. If you use embroidery thread to match your circle and a blind hem stitch along the edge, it barely shows and looks hand done. Thanks a bunch for the chance to win! ☺

    —Maree on November 21, 2013
  • I have to be honest: I am completely intimidated by circles and curves so I avoid them! But I like Nancy’s approach and the beauty of her quilts speaks to her success at creating amazing quilts. The new fabric collection is great fun!

    Susan Mulvihill on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t been brave enough to try circles. Perhaps the instructions in Nancy’s book would help me venture "around".

    —Linda on November 21, 2013
  • Timid–no way! More like running quickly and screaming as I do it. I applique all my circles. Why suffer?

    —Patricia Hersl on November 21, 2013
  • I have made a number of Dresden Plate quilts and just pin like crazy! LOL

    —Mary Ann Harpe on November 21, 2013
  • I have definitely been too timid to try circles, but ready to give it a try.

    —Judy D on November 21, 2013
  • The only circles I have attempted have been appliquéd, but have saved several pattern using curves but have not yet tried my hand with this. I’m always looking for new challenges in my quilting. This could be my next adventure in quilting.

    —Susan jablonske on November 21, 2013
  • I have only done by hand, would like to learn how to do circles on machine!

    —miranda on November 21, 2013
  • Even I admire quilts with circles I’m not confident enough to try them. More information and new fabric would be an excellent reason.

    —Alice on November 21, 2013
  • I really haven’t tried any curved piecing yet. I would really like your book to advise me how. The fabric would be nice to practice with.

    —Florence Daly on November 21, 2013
  • I have done hand applique and machine applique, and like doing both. To me the style of the quilt dictates the style of applique. Thanks for hosting a ‘give-away’.

    —Jaynie Gamble on November 21, 2013
  • I like to applique circles in place. After watching the video, I liked the idea of folding the circle in quarters and placing against the folded line of background piece. Thanks for the tip.

    —Joan Horton on November 21, 2013
  • Mostly too timid to try curved seams. When I have done circles, they are appliqued. A book like this would give me the courage to try more, more, more.

    Sharon Hansen on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve had a "circle quilt" on my bucket list for awhile now and I can’t wait to
    watch Nancy’s video and order her book. Star rubies is calling to me!

    —Joni on November 21, 2013
  • I am one of those who are too timid to try. There are many beautiful quilts with circles that are out there. I love Star Rubies. This book is a must have.Love the fabric.

    —Sandy D on November 21, 2013
  • Piecing curves intimidates me, so entire circles has been out of the question! But if Nancy has an easier way, I’m all for it. I love her patterns and her new fabric line is beautiful!

    —Donna V. on November 21, 2013
  • Most circles are hand appliqued. I’m really not too familiar with how to do them without making them look wonky. It’s on my bucket list of techniques to conquer.

    —Marguerite Namdar on November 21, 2013
  • My first attempt at sewing curves was in a quilt for a 21st birthday. Cut everything out and the pieces just fell into place sewing on the curves and holding the material about a inch and a half up a little as the material was feeding into the machine. No problem. The quilt was beautiful and done in creams and blue. (Drunkards Path design). Your fabric selection looks beautiful. Thank You.

    —Heather on November 21, 2013
  • I watched Nancy’s video was quite inspiring. Was to timid, but plan to try out Nancy’s technique out.

    —Paulette on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve appliqued circles and pieced a double wedding ring and would love to learn a new technique.

    —Robin Castor on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done much applique. I did make 1 circle one time that was part of a little birdhouse quilt wall hanging. If I remember correctly I cut a template circle out and cut the fabric a little bigger. Then loosely stitched the fabric to the template and gently tugged. Then hand appliqued the circle to the quilt. I’m not sure that I’m explaining this very well.

    —Lea on November 21, 2013
  • I watched Nancy’s video and found the video to be quite inspiring. I was to timid to try circles, but plan to try out Nancy’s technique.

    —Paulette on November 21, 2013
  • I guess I’m either a chicken or haven’t seen the need for a circle on any of my quilts. Would love to try Nancy’s technique though, just to prove to myself that I can do it. Thanks!

    —Wendy P on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve not yet worked up the courage to try circles and curves, but it seems with Nancy’s method it might be time for me to give it a try.

    —Denise Foster on November 21, 2013
  • If I do circles it is with heat and bond then applique

    —Christy Williams on November 21, 2013
  • I am a huge fan of Nancys designs and she has
    really outdone herself! The fabrics look so fresh
    And appealing used in her patterns. I would be estatic to win the
    book and the fabrics would be icing on the cake!

    —Pam L on November 21, 2013
  • I recently tried a drunkard’s path and was amazed how easy it was–should not have been afraid to try.

    —Valerie Patterson on November 21, 2013
  • curves and circles scare me, I could use so help

    elr on November 21, 2013
  • My mind goes in circles when I think of doing circles. I go into an avoidance response: I make a coffee, or I sort my fabrics, or I put a new needle in my machine, or I spin a bobbin… Whooee…I sure need a lesson. Oh, yes, I love the fabrics!!

    Gail G on November 21, 2013
  • I just use lots of pins and take my time. I enjoy the process and am careful to admire each seam even though that makes it take even longer. If I ever find myself starting to stress I remind myself that it’s supposed to be fun!
    I am open to learning new techniques however, and I’m loving the quilts from the book, and that fabric is absolutely gorgeous.

    —souixZea on November 21, 2013
  • I once had to make a Drunkard’s Path quilt — after I had "learned" that I hate piecing circles — I used freezer paper, machine appliqued the whole circle onto a whole square, and then quartered it for the blocks. It was OK, but I wasn’t real proud of that quilt. Better to avoid the curves! Problem is, I really love the way curves and circles look in quilts! The straight-pieced "illusion of curves" patterns are great, but I do yearn for the real thing. So I hope that Nancy’s book will finally solve the dilemma! PS: The new fabric is delicious beyond words!

    —Carol Barringer on November 21, 2013
  • I have been to timid to try. But seeing the beautiful lap quilts, I will have to put it on my list of "try" to see if I like.

    The fabric is awesome. Happy quilting.

    —DiAnn on November 21, 2013
  • Before piecing a double wedding ring quilt recently, I stayed completely away from anything that was not straight. Now, I’m a bit more comfortable, but far from jumping right into my next project that involves curves. This would change if I was the lucky one to win! I’m always eager to learn if someone out there has made it easy!

    —Paula on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve bought the templates, but not gotten up the nerve to try it yet. Maybe 2014 is the time.

    —edye cameron on November 21, 2013
  • Fusing is always fast. I have a computerized long arm that I am learning how to make circles around blocks. Adds a nice texture sometimes but I am sure this new book will make me wanna try circles of all kinds!

    —Debbie on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve tried circles in the past but they didn’t turn out very nice. So I’ve avoided them for years. I’m looking forward to trying Nancy’s technic. I love the patterns and the fabrics.

    —Lori Raymond on November 21, 2013
  • I have not tried circles yet, but I think that is going to change soon!
    Thanks for the informative technique. 🙂 and the give-away of course!

    —Connie Cain on November 21, 2013
  • I have not tried… yet… working up to it! thanks!

    Lee on November 21, 2013
  • The only curves I have tried are ones in the Craftsy Block of the Month 2012.
    Your book sounds very interesting!

    —Sheryl Miller on November 21, 2013
  • Until recently when I did a Drunkards Path that was die cut, I avoided curved piecing. I’ve been quilting for 50 years.

    —Barbara Ann Baugh on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve done a drunkards path block for a bom quilt using templates but wasn’t very happy with the result – have pretty much avoided any curved piecing since. Must give Nancy’s technique a try. The fabrics look yummy.

    —Karon Henderson on November 21, 2013
  • I have always done circles and curves as I learned long ago, thought the newer methods were cheating but then I see everyone using the newer method so decided it was ok so I will try it on the next quilt. I love Nancy’s new line of fabrics and would like to try circles with it.

    —Freida Bolin on November 21, 2013
  • I tried some curves both on the machine and by hand…very timid to start, but they were OK. Thanks for sharing. crystalbluern at onlineok dot com.

    —Debra Neiman on November 21, 2013
  • I find the center of each curved piece and match at least the centers (sometimes also the ends) and sew very slowly making sure to keep to a 1/4″ seam allowance. If I’m not feeling confident, I just use a lot more pins!

    —Diane Linker on November 21, 2013
  • I’m one of those "chickens" who have never tried circles. Would be willing to try after viewing Nancy"s YouTube video. Thanks.

    —Dorothy B on November 21, 2013
  • I have avoided circles unless they were ones that I machine appliqued. This book and the fabric would be a tremendous help in conquering the dreaded geometric figure.

    —Barbara on November 21, 2013
  • I am scared to death of circles!! Yet, I have an (unopened) circle cutter and have wanted to try it. One year at the International Quilt Festival in Houston, I bought a "circle system" where I would learn an "easy" technique to sew circles into my quilts. NEVER used it because when I tried it, the method was either way too complicated or the instructions were complicated! I need help! Would love to try them again. Your fabric is stunning, so beautiful!

    —Trish Wall on November 21, 2013
  • I sew the curves using lots of pins.

    Dorthy C. on November 21, 2013
  • After avoiding fusible applique for years, I have been exploring it in a few projects and am finding it quite do-able. I still avoid curved piecing.

    —Dixie on November 21, 2013
  • I have pieced the ‘pie’ many times until I realized I could stitch a circle to the center of a square and cut it into quarters. Voila! Four quarter circles to mix and match. i also use the windowing technique to cut down on the stiffness of the circle. This made designing much easier and quicker.

    —Cheryl Zehms on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve done curves and circles all ways imaginable and love the effect they bring to quilt design. My preferred method is what time dictates. A lover of hand applique it is what I turn to if time isn’t an issue. Otherwise it is most often stitch to fusible interfacing, slit and turn right side out, fuse and machine stitch. The quilts in Nancy’s latest book are delicious. I want to make them all. I also love the colours in Urban Classics.

    —Audrey on November 21, 2013
  • Those are cool looking patterns…..like the Sugar plums and the passion vine ones…they’d be cool to try making…When I need to make a circle for a moon or a mini tree skirt like I’m doing now…I use a circle ruler that I bought at the dollar store that has the degrees marked on it….or if I need larger than the 4 inch circle ruler I fold a piece of paper in quarter the size I need and then draw the 1/4 circle then cut the paper….Have a great xmas….

    —Darlene Krystal on November 21, 2013
  • I have made some New York Beauty blocks once that gave me fits!!! I love to applique, but have only made some circles to embellish not as a main part of a quilt. I am always willing to learn a new technique!!

    —Chris Archer on November 21, 2013
  • I am new to quilting and have only completed a couple of blocks with circles, but I am all for an easier and more efficient way. I look forward to the challenge of learning from a master of the art of circles.

    —Betty Good on November 21, 2013
  • I’m too new to quilting to have tried quilting circles yet. I have bought a nice circle cutter though and plan to try soon. I love the black, white, and red quilt with the circles! I may try one like that next year.

    —Elizabeth Dale on November 21, 2013
  • Actually I try not to sew circles or curves. I have only made one double wedding ring quilt. But now I will be able to make more with your way of applique. I have wanted to make so many quilts with circles and curves but just didn’t want to spend so much time on each block to make them just right. I watched your video and saw how easy it is to do. I can’t wait to start my next quilt. And you guessed it! I’m going to do a quilt with curves or circles. Thank you so much for showing us how to do this. I can’t wait to get ahold of your book.

    —Karen McCoach on November 21, 2013
  • I avoid circles unless they are machine appliqued. I’m a coward.
    Thanks for the give-a-way.

    —Valerie A. Clark on November 21, 2013
  • I have sewn the curve and appliqued circles. I much prefer the applique — faster and the results are just as lovely in my opinion.

    —Janice on November 21, 2013
  • I struggle to sew circles and curves with my machine. My apple core quilt is unfinished as I was unhappy with the sewing. I’ve watched the video and will try Nancy’s method so must buy glue today

    —Pamela Roberts on November 21, 2013
  • A friend showed me a great way to inset circles into a block using freezer paper and a wash out glue stick and it works really well! For the small circles I use starch, template plastic, and basting thread. I prefer to hand applique the circles on, but machine stitching is okay too!

    —Carol C on November 21, 2013
  • Circles aren’t bad – just have to sew them slowly!

    —Gwen W on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t sewn circles. It is time to do it!

    —Sue Simmons on November 21, 2013
  • I am timid! However, that is how I was with triangles when I first started quilting, now its great. So, trying my hand at circles, I know will be a piece of cake. Thanks

    —Shari M. on November 21, 2013
  • I hate hand stitching or appliqué, but I love circles in quilts. I love the movement it conveys. It’s nice to learn some easier ways to include circles in my quilts.

    —Sandy Myers on November 21, 2013
  • I would make a size right yo- yo and sew down on top!!Circles DON’T DON’t scare ME!!!!

    —jeanette on November 21, 2013
  • I have only made blocks using curved piecing, not a whole quilt. I tried pinning, no pinning, curve-master foot, all of these technique needs patience, practice, practice and practice. I am more intimidated to cut curves than piecing. I am drooling over this fabric line.

    Jereena Ameen Hussain on November 21, 2013
  • I have appliqued’ and hand stitched circles. It’s the only way I feel safe doing it. I feel as though I would lose control if I stitched by machine.

    —Mary Kendera on November 21, 2013
  • The few that I have done, I appliqued. I would love more instruction and the heavy starch method sounds like something I could do.

    —Betty on November 21, 2013
  • I recently appliqued two circles for blocks in a sampler quilt. Much easier than piecing. I have done reverse applique with some success but it takes a little time to prepare the fabric.
    I love your new fabric collection.

    —Polly Blank on November 21, 2013
  • I don’t do a lot of circles or curves, but when I did, I use templates and fusible web to get the shapes I needed, and then applying appliqué method put the circle to my quilt block. For example: the flower basket block, I use that method to put on basket handle, flower petals and leaves. This method takes a lot of time and patience, that’s why I try to avoid it. I’m interested in Nancy’s technique to help me to make more attractive and beautiful blocks.

    —Christine Pierson on November 21, 2013
  • Until last weekend I only appliqued circles (or avoided them altogether), but then I took a Sandy Klop workshop and was successful in sewing 3 Wagon Wheel blocks – so now there is light at the end of the (circle) tunnel! Pinning or even better die cut notches do help getting them sewn.
    Thanks for a chance!

    Barb in MI on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done any circles with fabric in a quilt. I have free motioned circles on a quilt and that was definitely an experience. Not all great, but for a little child, so they loved it even with all its errors.

    —Ellen on November 21, 2013
  • I love to do the traditional piecing of the curves, but with a no pin method, but I love the idea do starch and invisible machine appliqué!

    —Trudi on November 21, 2013
  • I have not sewn many circles in my quilts. Only a couple of drunkard’s path blocks in a sampler. They did not look very neat so, for a while I have been avoiding them. I would love to receive your new book and use it to refine my circles.

    mandy laseter on November 21, 2013
  • I, too, have avoided those dreaded, but beautiful circles. I would love to learn a manageable method for constructing quilts with circular patterns out of that gorgeous fabric!

    —Linda Taylor on November 21, 2013
  • I have tried many methods of sewing circles, sewing them in by machine, appliqueing by hand and machine as well as hand sewing them in. I’m not sure I have a favorite method, but I do like them. I love some of Nancy’s new patterns in her new book. They look like they would be fun. Thanks for the chance to win.

    —Edie on November 21, 2013
  • In the past, I’ve usually cut circles (backed with vliesofix) and ironed them in place before appliqueing them onto the background. It’s the cheats way I know but I’ve always been too chicken to try piecing curves. After reading about Nancy’s method I think I could manage it, if I start out small 🙂

    Her quilts are so inspirational. Thanks for a really inspiring subject!

    —Kayt on November 21, 2013
  • I have a circle cutter and then sew the circles into the fabric. Would love to try to do it your way, Nancy; I’m for sure going to try it. Love all your videos in youtube! Thanks so much for sharing!

    —Elsje on November 21, 2013
  • I have numerous patterns of circles for quilting and have just never gotten the nerve up to give it a try – even just a wall hanging or lap quilt size. This new book and wonderful assortment of beautiful fabric of Nancy’s gets my creative juices flowing and it would be great to have one written by such a delightful author to push me on to get a project started (and hopefully completed)!

    —Betty Paschal on November 21, 2013
  • WOW! This would be a wonderful book to win. Sounds like it takes the fear out of circles & curves. Thanks for this offer.

    —Nancy on November 21, 2013
  • Quarter circles are about the only shape I’ve tried. I am a self taught quilter, but enjoy any challenge. I too believe in pins and more pins! My 4-H experiences taught me that when sewing in a sleeve – the more pins the better!

    —Cheryl Cargill on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve done some using fusible interfacing.
    thanks for the giveaway

    —Nancy on November 21, 2013
  • I had a "circle" quilt in my head, started it, but then grew too frustrated to continue on. I would love a copy of Nancy’s book! Maybe I could revive the quilt in my head!

    —Robin May on November 21, 2013
  • I learned how to sew curves from a fabulous teacher in 7th grade sewing class in 1951, so I’m comfortable with sewn-in curves and circles — lots of pins and inner curve snips.

    —Elizabeth Monahan on November 21, 2013
  • Oh wow the circles look fabulous im afraid to try circles but this post has inspired me so who knows now 🙂

    —Tracey maguire on November 21, 2013
  • I am afraid of circles and curves, but I very much want to make a circle quilt for my youngest granddaughter. I love Nancy’s books.

    —Roberta Johnson on November 21, 2013
  • I do it the beginners way—I sew a 1/4 inch around the circle.
    Clip the curves every little bit, pin the circle down and
    turn the fabric under, then sew the circle down by machine
    Stitching. It takes a little while, but it gets done.

    —Pat Cosper on November 21, 2013
  • I like doing curves even the "painful" way as many would call it. I learned to sew garments initially & got quite good at setting in sleeves. This process is very similiar in my opinion. However, when there’s an easier way I’m all for it! Along with being a "fabric addict" who couldn’t love this wonderful collection! Thanks for the chance to win.

    —Valerie L on November 21, 2013
  • I have tried the snip&turn as you go method, which was tedious. The results were horrible! I’m excited to try it again, though, using these different tips. Believe me, any way is better than my way…

    Saranda on November 21, 2013
  • This is a horror story! I clip one edge and pin a lot! Then I hold my breath as I try to sew evenly around. I’m not always successful so I would love Nancy’s book and her fabric to try out her method!

    —Kathleen Gunning on November 21, 2013
  • I am way to timid! Just beginning, so I get excited when my corners match!

    —Cindy Weeks on November 21, 2013
  • I have several tools, but have not tried them. If it’s as easy as she says it is, I’ll soon be quilting circles and curves around everything.

    —Mary C Patterson on November 21, 2013
  • So far not dared to sew the curves … And I would love to learn … Quilts Nancy’s are so beautiful!

    —Mania on November 21, 2013
  • too timid to try!!! but love the look of circle quilts!

    —Shannon Olden on November 21, 2013
  • I usually machine applique my circles in place after fusing them down. When sewing curves in place I mark the center on each piece, and then pin at the beginning, the end, and in the middle. This makes it very easy to ease the curved edges so that they match well and the seam looks flawless.

    —Amy Cofer on November 21, 2013
  • My circles have been appliqued either by hand or machine.

    —Mary Kellogg on November 21, 2013
  • I have pretty much stayed away from circles and curves. Having this new book and fabrics would certainly give me the incentive to try them out!

    —Dotti Mondoux on November 21, 2013
  • I usually fuse them onto the background fabric and then machine appliqué around either with a straight stitch or blanket stitch. Love Nancy’s tip on the video. Thanks for the sweet giveaway 🙂

    —Terry on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve done Drunkard’s Path blocks by holding the convex section above the concave section while sewing them together using a very short stitch length. I also made the convex section slightly larger than the standard size and then trim it after the two parts are sewn together.

    —Marlene Kolz on November 21, 2013
  • I have never tried this technique, but would love to learn.
    Thanks for the opportunity to win fabric and Happy Thanksgiving to you.

    —Sylvia on November 21, 2013
  • I have never tried circles, looks so complicated. I never thought of using an applique procedure. thanks Nancy!

    —Terri Douglass on November 21, 2013
  • I love the look, but yes, there is some fear and so I have only done them on the occasional sampler block. Never in big, bold repeats like Nancy’s quilts. The book looks fabulous, and the fabric is gorgeous. I’d love to win!

    —Nancy Philips on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done any curved piecing before, but I would love to try. The book quilts are wonderful!

    —Lisa E on November 21, 2013
  • HI, I love doing curves, drunkards path blocks, or any other way of doing circles! I have fused them too, then stitched them down. Just love curves & circles, they have always intrigued me. Your new book looks interesting, would love to add one to my quilt library & check it out! Thanks for doing this for us! Winning fabric is always a plus too!

    —Nancy Kindlund on November 21, 2013
  • For circles that are appliqued, I usually run a basting stitch through the seam allowance, then gather the edges up over a circle template made of heat proof plastic and press it. For curves, I pin a LOT and sew slowly and carefully

    —Joan on November 21, 2013
  • I am still intimidated by circles, but usually interface with a lightweight fusible; then usually apply permanently with a hem stitch and invisible thread. Love the quilts that are posted!

    —Pam Hunt on November 21, 2013
  • for me circles have always been able to fascinate me. what goes around comes around,the circle of life,ect.even though i have this life long love of circles i have been too timid to add circles even in my machine quilting.i can not draw a good circle so i have quit trying to cut circles,unless there is a dark line around the circle.i will definitely be looking into this new book! thank you for your consideration,lynne

    —lynne hogan on November 21, 2013
  • Haven’t tried this.

    —debbie on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve sewn Bull’s Eye blocks by machine and Drunkard’s Path blocks by hand. That is all the sewing of curves I have done. I am a little intimidated to try anything else!

    —Sandy A in St. Louis on November 21, 2013
  • I have not tried circles, but would love to learn and try this–fabrics are beautiful and fun!

    —Janet M on November 21, 2013
  • I have taught Drunkard’s Path using Eleanor Burn’s method. It was an OK method to use, but I found that using interfacing, sewing the circle, turning is right side out then pressing and cutting into quarters caused the interfacing to show on some seams. It’s not bad to learn a new technique, but I would prefer learning a different method. This book looks like it would make circles and curves a snap! If I won this book, I would teach it at a number of retreats that I will hold in my area, and get my students to invest in their own books. Circles and curves bring such a beautiful flow to quilts and it’s sad to know how many quilters shy away from using these design elements.

    —Melody on November 21, 2013
  • I was frustrated with circles and curves so I got an instruction book and did a lot of practicing. Then I made a quilt for my nephew called "Yin and Yang" published in McCalls quilting.

    —Mary on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve just started to quilt and have not tried circles yet so this book will be extremely helpful.

    —Linda H on November 21, 2013
  • I actually purchased the "curve master foot" for my machine and it works great! I’m still working on my first curved quilt – Urban Escape using the Quick Curve ruler by Sew Kind of Wonderful. Thanks for the wonderful giveaway! I’d love to try more curve projects!

    Stephanie Zito on November 21, 2013
  • I have always used a a drunkards path quarter circle and L-shape template with creative master’s circle presser foot. While While this has worked most of the time. . I run into the problem of sizing the cruve or circles to fit my project.
    I have used invisible thread for hand work but not in my machine.

    Debi Bielawski on November 21, 2013
  • Circles are difficult to applique. Circle templates seem to work the best for me. Thanks for the chance to win fabric and book.

    —darlene on November 21, 2013
  • Have tried machine appliqué and sew very slowly with a tiny zig zag and invisible thread. The fabrics are so lovely, and the book looks fantastic. Thank you for the give away, hope I win.

    —Catherine on November 21, 2013
  • The few circles I have done was fabric ironed to steam-a-seam, cut out and then machined appliqued down. This looks like a great book.

    —Cheryl D on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve been too scared to try. Guess I need this book to show me how!

    —Suzanne McFadden on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t tackled sewing circles because of the difficulty I had with one drunkard’s path block. I love the appliqué method you just shared. Look out circles here I come!

    —Josefina on November 21, 2013
  • Too timid to try. But your quilts look fantastic. Would love to win the book and the fabric!

    —Moneca on November 21, 2013
  • I like to try new methods..so I did pieced 1/4 of the circle like in ‘drunkard path’ and also machine applique the circles in place after fusing them down. The quilts in the book are beautiful…thank you for the giveaway…

    —marta on November 21, 2013
  • pin it with in a fraction of it life

    helenmiles on November 21, 2013
  • I sewed circles with the machine…no problems, then someone told me it was difficult…how did I miss that part !

    Michael on November 21, 2013
  • Boo Hoo! I’ve never even tried.

    —Lynda on November 21, 2013
  • I avoid pieced curves or circles. When I applique circles, I make them using Karen Kay Buckley’s Perfect Circles templates.

    —Shelly S. on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done circles yet! Too chicken to try it so far, but this book might encourage me to try!

    —Kathy on November 21, 2013
  • I have always loved the curved look of circles on a quilt but to this point I have avoided making them!! The patterns in Nancy’s book are fabulous and I would have trouble choosing which one to make. I love them all!!

    —D. Craig on November 21, 2013
  • I like her technique. I use Fons and Porters fabric glue for most of my applique work and then do a machine satin stitch around the applique. At least with fabric glue one doesn’t have to worry about pins. Love the colors in her fabric giveaway by P&B. Happy Thanksgiving to all.

    —Diane Baldwin on November 21, 2013
  • I like to use Charlotte’s Web fusible thread to do a raw edge appliqué !!

    —Bev on November 21, 2013
  • So far I have tried fusible, hand applique, machine blanket stitch, raw edge applique, backing with interfacing. I will admit your way looks more precise. Am going to try it on my next circle project. I’m loving the fabric and the new book. would be a super nice gift for ME.

    —psmotil on November 21, 2013
  • I have not tried this technique but have tried others and love circles

    —Cindy Garaas on November 21, 2013
  • I have not used circles , just too scared of them. This sounds like the way to make them less scarey.

    —Louise Cheever on November 21, 2013
  • The only curves I have sewn is in the Solomon’s Puzzle Block or Drunkard’s Path in a sampler quilt. I used my stiletto to ease the curves in place. Otherwise, I lack the confidence to make a quilt with circular quilt blocks.

    —kaybaby on November 21, 2013
  • I have recently acquired and used (a little bit) Karen Kay Buckley’s Perfect Circles, but definitely need to get more experience with them.

    —Julie Phillips on November 21, 2013
  • love the star rubies. have been looking for a red and white quilt for my niece and this is perfect.
    thank you for the contest opportunity

    —lavonne hansen on November 21, 2013
  • I tried a wedding ring quilt (crazy to attempt something that complicated for my first quilt) and it was a total disaster!!! Have not had the guts to try curves again. The quilts in your book look gorgeous! Gorgeous enough to tempt me out of my mental block…. Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Sherrye on November 21, 2013
  • I Love the Modern Quilts with circles but I have been a little aprehensive about trying them. Would love to have the book to take the next step.

    —Janice on November 21, 2013
  • This is a technique I have not tried but it looks like fun. I am sure this new book would be an inspiration.

    —mary on November 21, 2013
  • I have not been brave enough to try curves and circles. I would love to win the book to learn some new techniques. And the fabric would be a wonderful addition to my stash! Thanks for the opportunity to win.

    —Kathy C on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve only made 3 quilts, and they’ve all been straight lines. I would love to win this book and learn how to expand my skills!

    —Karen Cohn on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t been brave enough to do any curves. I think they are beautiful, and have bought a 1/4 circle template set, but haven’t broken it out yet. Having sewn garments for years, I can ease curved seams without trouble. I’m just going to need to suck it up and try! Would love this book and fabric to help me get over my fear…

    —Terry Ginzburg on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve been alittle chicken in doing circles This book looks like I could realy try and do a circle

    —Diane S on November 21, 2013
  • On the rare occasion when I have included circles or curves in a quilt, I have usually hand appliqued them. I love the quilts in this book!

    —Julie in GA on November 21, 2013
  • I’m pretty timid about curves BUT have done a few small projects with curves, would love to know more! YOur fabrics are beautiful!

    —Mona on November 21, 2013
  • I love circle quilts. I created one where I appliquéd all the circles onto the quilt by hand and then I made one where the circles were in sections like pieces of pie. I would love to learn a new easier technique. Thanks

    —Polly on November 21, 2013
  • Ooooooooooooooh, I so love "round" looking quilt blocks, so this would be a gem to own. All those lucious fabrics would look fabulous as circles! Thanks for the chance to win them.

    —Ele W. on November 21, 2013
  • I would use a circle template and lots of starch from Best Press and let it dry, iron it like crazy, make sure it’s dry, remove the template and right away stitch it down with a blind hem stitch by machine using matching thread color. I would go real slow and pray a lot that it would come out all right. Fran Love the P & B fabrics.

    —Fran Claassens on November 21, 2013
  • The book looks great and the fabric is beautiful! I have sewn curved piecing (Rob Peter to pay Paul pattern) very tediously, holding the top piece of fabric up and trying to join them under the needle. It took many, many practice pieces, practically a whole quilt worth until I was satisfied with the result. I look forward to seeing all the tips and technique in the book. Thank you.

    —Ronna on November 21, 2013
  • I avoid circles like many avoid the "A" word, lol, in fact, I’d applique them if necessary! I look forward to learning a new technique! The fabrics are gorgeous as well! Maybe I’ll be lucky enough to win! Thank you, and Happy Holidays!

    —Kathy O in GA on November 21, 2013
  • I would like to try quilting with circles and curves but I’ve avoided it for a while now! I wouldn’t even know where to begin. Yikes!

    —Diane C on November 21, 2013
  • I have tried to stay away from circles and curves in patchwork. But this new book looks like a super way to learn. And the fabrics are absolutely beautiful!!! Thank you for the opportunity to enter this contest. Happy Thanksgiving to all!!

    —Geneva Lowery on November 21, 2013
  • I used foundation cloth to sew circles. Had very good results.

    —Carol Broughton on November 21, 2013
  • I have only done some applique circles. I need to try new ideas and techniques. I love the fabrics and can see myself making circles with these.

    —Sue P on November 21, 2013
  • Too timid to try curves and circles? Terrified would be a more accurate description, but I’d love to try your method. It certainly sounds doable.
    Your quilts are just beautiful!

    —Joan H. on November 21, 2013
  • Not yet, still phobic about curves, I love the curvy quilts. I think this will need to be a class so I have company and extra help if I get in a pickle. Your quilts are beauiful-thanks for sharing picts and techniques.
    Cheers!
    Carol

    —Carol on November 21, 2013
  • I have to admit I’m one of "them" who are intimidated by circles, so I haven’t chosen patterns with them as yet. I tend to be drawn to the new fun circle patterns though, so I promised myself to try it out!

    —Patti Dubler on November 21, 2013
  • A friend taught my group a method of sewing circles in to the fabric using a circle template smaller that desired circle, snipping edge of cut out circle,using spray starch, freezer paper, stitching the edge of the the new circle to the snipped edge of the fabric and you get a perfect circle every time.It takes a leap of faith to cut a hole in your fabric, I would love to try Nancy’s new book and win the beautiful fabric.

    —Barb S. on November 21, 2013
  • Circles? As a beginning beginner, I’ve never even considered circles!

    —Pat K on November 21, 2013
  • I haven’t done circles, yet, but have that on my bucket list.

    Barbara Winkler on November 21, 2013
  • I like to hand applique my circles.

    —Susan Kellam on November 21, 2013
  • I applique my circles on with Heat and Bond then machine applique around the circles. I want to learn new ways to make circles and curves from your new book and fabrics. Enjoy your Youtube videos.

    —Mary Ruda on November 21, 2013
  • I have always been afraid of circles and curves but would love to try this technique.

    —Doris Cardno on November 21, 2013
  • I have never tried circles and curves even though I bought a Drunkards Path Kit a few years ago I haven’t tried making it yet. I coluld sure use some assistance.

    —ELIZAJANE on November 21, 2013
  • I have only done circles once I cut each out fused to a 4 patch then satin stitched it turned out wonderful my daughter wants the quilt but i have yet to part with it i so enjoy looking at it

    —jo on November 21, 2013
  • I have always done my circles using needle turn hand applique.
    But after watching your video I’m ready to try something new.

    —Elizabeth Lee on November 21, 2013
  • I have not yet worked with circles, but I would like to learn Nancy’s technique. The quilts in her new book are so beautiful and I love her new fabric line. Thanks for the great giveaway!

    —Bonnie on November 21, 2013
  • I am still largely in the "Hunter/Gatherer" stage of quilting, I am starting a strip quilt as it seems to be the most forgiving …. however the idea of doing circles makes me nervous. Especially the idea of piecing them, the applique seems to make more sense at this point. I appreciate the chance to win the book.

    —Alice on November 21, 2013
  • I have been too afraid to try anything like circles or curves. Still working on nine patch, lol, but would love to learn how to do this. Sounds fascinating.

    —Sarah G. on November 21, 2013
  • Since I mostly applique, I’m a big fan of the starch and template method. Beyond that I usually find another pattern and avoid the curves! thks for the giveaway.

    —Pamela Reim on November 21, 2013
  • I love to play with drunkards path blocks and tend to treat almost the same way as set in sleeves. There is a large drunkards path block that I am collecting fabric to make. Nancy Mahoney’s designs involving circles shows just how much fum she has designing blocks and quilts. I have loved her designs since I first saw them and I definitely love this new book of hers.

    —Sandy H on November 21, 2013
  • I use a trick I learned from Martha Pullen for making Madeira hems: you sew a scallop or half-circle (two pieces of fabric, right sides together)with water-soluble thread, trim, notch, and turn. Then press (no steam!) Once you’re sure everything is nice and smooth, either steam or spray with water to dissolve the thread, and separate the two pieces of fabric. Voila! You have your scallop or half-circle all ready to applique!

    —Roberta Kennedy on November 21, 2013
  • A couple of years ago, after quilting 20 yrs, I decided I had shilly-shallyed away from curves long enough. So, I tried it. After carefully plodding along, I was buzzing along just like I was straight piecing. I only thought curves were scary. They aren’t. Try it.
    And I love the fabrics.

    —Claudia on November 21, 2013
  • Circles are intimidating to me… I need to get the squares down first…
    Debi

    —Debi Haupt on November 21, 2013
  • Looks so easy now! I have not tried circles, but I will now. Thanks

    —Betty Peterson on November 21, 2013
  • I applique my circles on; usually using my sewing machine’s circle attachment.

    —Sandra Chavez on November 21, 2013
  • I like to fuse or machine appliqué circles on my quilts.

    —Lora on November 21, 2013
  • I use the freezer paper and starch method and press the seam allowance to the back. Then I sew the circle to the block by machine, sewing in the crease–on the wrong side of the circle. Then I cut the fabric out from underneath the circle. I have been very successful with this technique. I love to learn new techniques and would be thrilled to win the book and fabric bundle. I haven’t bought any fabric lately because I don’t really like the modern stuff, but these prints are cheerful and colorful, and the designs are dynamic and energizing. I would love to work with them and add my own touches.

    —E. Campbell on November 21, 2013
  • That Blue Bayou is gorgeous! I would like to learn to do circles. I’m up for the challenge!

    —Rosemary on November 21, 2013
  • I usually cut paper circles, cut my fabric from them and decorative stitch them in place or quilt around my paper disc’s for the shape in my machine quilting, time consuming but it works. I’m happy to learn new things so thanks to Nancy for coming up with something new! Circles are my favorite shape and I love any quilt with circles on it.

    —Jami price on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve been too scared of sewing curves & circles in my quilting but would love to learn how to sew them, they’re such a. Great design element. Thanks for the lovely giveaway.

    —Fran on November 21, 2013
  • i have only made one circle quilt, and i fused it, but this book is very interesting to me, and i love the patterns featured in this article. thx for a chance to win!

    Jamee Levy on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve sewn circles (and arcs) by piecing on the sewing machine, by hand, and the simplest method – just lay the circle down on a background and sew over the edge with a fancy machine stitch. Great way to play with all those unusual stitches that I rarely use!

    —Marilyn on November 21, 2013
  • I have been timid to try as I really need a book that show me how. I have always wanted to do circles.

    —Robin Batchelor on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve been too timid to try yet~! But I hope to tackle it soon. Thanks for the chance to win!

    —Karrie Smith on November 21, 2013
  • I’m learning to like circles and squares (or squares and circles or circles and circles). I have tried 2 ways to join the square/circle: turn the edge of the circle under and using a fabric glue stick (or a light coat of liquid starch with a small paint brush). Attach the circle to the right side of the square. Stitch as desired with an applique or top stitch. Or better yet, stitch from the wrong side and NO stitching shows. Now it is ready to use as is, cut into a Drunkards Path shape, wedges, or whatever you feel like to set your creativity free. Thank you Nancy, PB Textiles, and Martingale for letting all of share ideas and hopefully win.

    PS – these ideas were a hands-on program at my quilt guild about a year ago.

    —Linda Clark on November 21, 2013
  • I have never tried but, it is on my list to do. Thanks for the chance to win some beautiful fabric.

    —Kathleen Lambert on November 21, 2013
  • Sewing circles or curved pieces by machine scares me. I’ve been too timid to give it a try.

    —Linda Webster on November 21, 2013
  • I have done quite a bit of curved piecing. I don’t use pins, and I keep a finger between the two layers to allow them to curve together as they go under the foot. The quilts in Nancy’s book are simply breathtaking, and I absolutely need a copy!

    —Amy Eileen Koester on November 21, 2013
  • I’ve sewn curves by using the Simple Curves ruler by Phillips in one easy table top. I’ve also taken two curves pieces as in an apple core and pinned them in 4 places to use in feeding the curve into the sewing machine. Patience is really needed to do that. It’s a small table runner. I plan to make a quilt with circles and do applique with them or sew them RST with lightweight interfacing and turn them right side out for a smooth, finished circle that can stay in shape while stitching it onto the background.

    —Janet in ND on November 21, 2013
  • Truthfully, I’ve been afraid to try. But always thought that some day I’d do it.

    —Christie on November 21, 2013
  • TOO TIMID doesn’t even cover it! Try SCARED TOO DEATH!! I’m still trying just to master ANGLES/TURNS!!! But, in due time, I will have to learn curves … mastery of ALL techniques is a MUST!!

    —Adrianne on November 21, 2013
  • I have only tried curves a couple of times… oncr appliques & a drunkards path. But want to do more!

    —jeannine on November 21, 2013
  • Have always wanted to learn how to sew circular design,Nacy’s book and technique make it look easy. After my stroke i had to learn to sew again now it’s time to get out of my comfort zone and give it a go. Thankyou for the chance to enter the competition

    —marian on November 21, 2013
  • I have never tried circles or curves — Yet! But I sure will if I win!

    —Laura on November 21, 2013
  • I use a heat proof plastic template sheet, spray starch, and an iron to form the circle, glue it to the fabric with washable Elmer’s brand glue or Roxanne’s Glue Baste It, and hand applique (which I prefer) the circle to the fabric.

    —Katy on November 21, 2013
  • I adore circles! I’ve done two quilts and several table runners. I am a newbie quilter, so have no fear, if I can do it so can you. I will be searching for Nancy’s newest book!

    —Maureen Niemeyer on November 21, 2013
  • I have been too afraid to even try circles. Maybe it is past time for me to try. Thank you for the giveaway, regardless of who wins it.

    —Sharon on November 22, 2013
  • All by machine, traditionaly pieced or appliqued. Thanks

    Béatrice on November 22, 2013
  • I’m new at quilting, something I started after retiring, so all the help I can get in doing circles (they make me crazy) would be so appreciated. I love your quilts you showed with circles, makes me want to try them.

    —elizabeth harris on November 22, 2013
  • So far I have not had the nerve to try curves – but Nancy’s book could be the push I need. Thanks for the opportunity to win!

    —Margaret Lawrence on November 22, 2013
  • I haven"t really tried yet- I’m too timid & need instruction!

    —GG Bocchino on November 22, 2013
  • I sew circles to a backing wrong side together and then turn and press before sewing down

    —Karen on November 22, 2013
  • I follow the pattern directions … if i’m doing my own thing, I use my circle cutter to cut my fabric circle and a matching muslin circle and sew them together with right side inside, slit the muslin and turn it right side out and stitch it down; or cut the fabric circle with my cutter and raw edge it to the background. curves … sew the convex to the concave while slowly stitching and easing the top piece matching edges together as I go.

    ritainalaska on November 22, 2013
  • I have been too timid to try, but I love what I have seen so far. I love your book.

    —Lisa on November 22, 2013
  • I love circles and have made a number of round things. I mostly just sew round on the machine. Pieced circles are lots of fun to play with and make getting a nice shape simple.
    Lots of inspiration in this book. Thanks for the opportunity to own it.

    mistea on November 22, 2013
  • I just watched your video on lining circle on fabric,wonderful idea and so simple.I fold my background fabric & would then eyeball it. Your method is more accurate, thank you for sharing. Would be over joyed to be a winner. Happy Quilting:)

    —Sheila Ivany on November 22, 2013
  • I haven’t tried circles – they’re scary! If you can take me out of my comfort zone, that would be wonderful!

    Jan Allston on November 22, 2013
  • The circles are so creative, I bet that they’re challenging & exciting at the same time!

    —David on November 22, 2013
  • You have some beautiful designs! I haven’t tried any circles in my quilting, but there isn’t a great reason for this except to make it simpler. I wasn’t afraid of challenges back in the day of sewing garments… time to get my game face on and try something new using these great tips.

    —Marie Pearson on November 22, 2013
  • Would love to read about her technique and try it out!

    —Carrie on November 22, 2013
  • First, I’d just like to say that I have only been quilting since August and everything I know I learned from the Internet. There are so many great tools at our disposal and they’re yours for the taking! Of course my first project required me to do curves with ins and outs. So I checked my favorite sources and they all suggested using fusible webbing. So that’s what I used. I used an appliqué stitch to finish it off. Darn if that wasn’t some of the slowest sewing I have ever done because I wanted to stitches to be perfect because it was a gift for my in-laws. They were nice stitches. I haven’t come across any more circles yet but I will have some hexies to sew on soon.

    Thank you for the sneak peek at your new fabric Nancy. It’s really beautiful and in my color palette so I can’t wait to find them at my favorite vendor.

    Lisa

    —Lisa S on November 22, 2013
  • Circles in quilts I admire from afar
    Would only attempt with courage from a jar.
    Perhaps if I had this book
    I would take another look.

    —Garnet on November 22, 2013
  • I grew up sewing set-in sleeves thus curves are pretty easy. Circles are okay but with fusible interfacing they are a snap, especially raw edge circles. Patience is the key for me.

    —Sue on November 22, 2013
  • I quilt circles and curves using needleturn applique or VERY SLOWLY stitch them on my machine as I want nice smooth edges. I’ve used the plastic templets and starch method a couple of times and really liked it because it allows smooth edges like needleturn applique. Nancy’s patterns look great and I would love to win her new book and those beautiful fabrics! Thanks, Nancy, for your great ideas!!

    —Ann Williamson on November 22, 2013
  • Curves are very intimidating. I’ve made 1 quilt top that isn’t finished yet because it didn’t come out very well. Would be so nice to know the secret to making them easy. Thank you for coming out with this book.

    —Lee on November 22, 2013
  • I have both machine appliqued, hand appliqued, and machine pieced circles and curves on my quilts. I think I prefer machine applique the most.

    —Pat F from MA on November 22, 2013
  • Ive always been to scared to try but would love to learn

    —Sonja on November 22, 2013
  • I have took a class in circles – I havent finished the quilt yet – but looking at these quilt patterns I might get inspired to try it – love the fabric line

    —Nancy Hart on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve sewn curves, but I always have held my breath while doing them and I’ve had to take out seams many times. This book has many interesting new insights, as to both technique and creative color combinations.

    —Alice Kane on November 22, 2013
  • Look the tips! Am new to quilting so they are invaluable

    —randie kelley on November 22, 2013
  • I have only started to play with sewing with curves and circles.

    Colette on November 22, 2013
  • Gorgeous quilts, it makes me want to try circles.

    —Jodi on November 22, 2013
  • I shy away from circles, but I am certainly going to try Nancy’s technique.

    —Shelor Robin on November 22, 2013
  • I have NEVER tried circles but would very much like to do so. Any circle I have used in a quilt have been appliqued. I really like the "Lots of Dots". Thank you for the giveaway!

    —Janey on November 22, 2013
  • As a new quilter, I have not yet tried to work with circles and curves.

    —Janet G on November 22, 2013
  • Too timid to try honestly. I see a lot of wobbly curves and frustration..so I avoid them I guess.

    —Jenny on November 22, 2013
  • I love circles! I have done both piecing and appliqué- just depends on the project. Looks like a great book!

    —Diane on November 22, 2013
  • Very carefully? 🙂 I’ve never done more than a few applique circles.. too chicken to tackle any more.

    —Carol on November 22, 2013
  • Haven’t tried it yet, but these look amazing, and I one of these is in my "must try" stack.

    —Karen on November 22, 2013
  • These are so beautiful! I want to try this

    —Sydney Booker on November 22, 2013
  • I go with fusing and buttonhole or satin stitch technique for circles.

    —Rosalind Gutierrez on November 22, 2013
  • I’m a fairly new quilter, on and off for the last 3 years. I look at circles find them a wonderful design element and absolutely terrifying. I didn’t think I would ever even attempt them but this method has me considering them. I’ve done an applique piece with curves, I might be able to do this!

    —Joyce on November 22, 2013
  • I would like to say I have been too busy to make any quilts with circles, but to be honest it is probably because they intimidate me! LOL

    Beautiful fabric line and beautiful quilts!

    Bari on November 22, 2013
  • I LOVE circles! I have pieced them, fused them, and tried the starch applique method. I love the way they allow movement through the quilt. And the fact they look like polka-dots is a plus for me. Circles just make me happy.

    —Denise on November 22, 2013
  • I am intimidated by circles altho I love the look. Would love to give this method a try.

    —Suzanne on November 22, 2013
  • Bummed. I don’t like curves or appliqué. I do have some templates that make curved piecing easier, so I don’t avoid it completely. I need to try y seams one day.

    —Karen on November 22, 2013
  • I have made a Drunkard’s Path quilt and a Apple Core quilt by hand. I’m not very good at appliqué and I once tried to make circles with the machine. But I am no very good at it. I would love learn it.

    —Agnes on November 22, 2013
  • I have never tried adding circles…as a confident beginner I am doing well without adding the additional challenge of circles! But I always like trying something new so maybe will give it chance!:)

    —Gen on November 22, 2013
  • I haven’t been brave enough to try yet! I would love to win Nancy’s book though and try them out 🙂

    —candace on November 22, 2013
  • I have been afraid of circles but the book just might temp me

    —Patty on November 22, 2013
  • I have been too terrified to try doing circles. This sounds too easy. Thank you for this opportunity, it’s wonderful.

    —Irene Gourlay on November 22, 2013
  • I usually hand appliqué all of the pattern pieces on the block. I sometimes use freezer paper to help. I love the look of circles and squares together. So modern.

    —Suzanne on November 22, 2013
  • I have not done circles yet but want to try.

    —Diane Pfluger on November 22, 2013
  • 1) For the Drunkard’s Path: I cut, to size, my background fabric and using a plate as a guide, I mark my circle on the secondary fabric. Using flower head pins (they lay flatter), I center and pin cut-out circle to background fabric, and decorate machine stitch around the outside edge. Cut in 4 quarters and proceed from there.
    2) I have a circular rotary cutter and after cutting my needed size, I blanket or Applique’ stitch it down on my background fabric.
    3) Using Denise Labadie’s technique, shown in Quilter’s Newsletter magazine dated January/February 2008/NO 399, I’ve found to be time consuming, but easy. Do I make many quilts with circles? Not really, I’m more of a HST, square, and rectangled person, but this book would encourage me to turn from my old timey ways.

    Keep smiling,

    Lynnita Shipman on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve always sewn circles and curves the old fashioned way. I can never remember whether the convex side goes on top or bottom and have to find the how to book before I can sew. Learning a faster, easier way would be great.

    —Carolyn on November 22, 2013
  • I have for the most part sewn them by hand. When stitching my machine, I carefully sew circles slowly. I find that clipping the seams and ironing them so there are no "square" sides the important tedious part.

    —Denise Laverriere on November 22, 2013
  • I admit, I’m a curve chicken!! so I pretty much stay away from circles & curves, but the lots of dots baby quilt is really cute, so maybe I’ll have to be brave & try!! Thanks!

    —Debbie R on November 22, 2013
  • I sew the circle and fusible web with right sides together (glue bumps on inside). Trim close, slit the fusible and turn right sides out. Press into place. This gives finished edges to the circle. Then I use decorative stitches around the edge of the circle.

    —Janet Leigh on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve just started using curves and I was sewing them together with lots of pins! Now I’m ready to try a new technique. Thanks for have a super giveaway.

    —Susan Stanton on November 22, 2013
  • I wanted to give each of my 5 grandsons a quilt that reflected their favorite thing at the time I started the quilt and it had to be a design that they would be able to use throughout there childhood. One was in love with Pokemon Balls. So, what choice did I have but to make him a quilt with circles of primary colors which looked liked they were dumped out of a box. None of these circles were appliqued. Small wedges of various sizes and arcs were pieced in 5″ blocks and then assembled in rows to make them appear to be over lapping. I am a fairly new quilter and it was challenging to say the least… I guess I did OK because he loved it.

    —Rhoda W on November 22, 2013
  • I simply raw edge applique using a tight zigzag or satin stitch.

    —Darla Zimmer on November 22, 2013
  • I would love to try this technique as I have tried circles only one other time and I have to agree it was a very tedious process.

    —Marlene Hahn on November 22, 2013
  • Only did once, a little girls quilt from flannel. Cut 1/4 circles, "appliqued" by machine on the blocks with 1/2″ seam allowance so when finished I could clip around curve for a rag style quilt. Would really like Nancy’s book for her tips and ideas. Happy Holidays everyone!

    —April on November 22, 2013
  • Curved seams are my nemesis! I have a retro flowers template (like drunkard’s path), and the apple core die for my Accuquilt Go, but have been too afraid to try them. I’m sure Nancy’s book would help me conquer those fears. Thanks for the give away!

    —Jacklynn Grimm on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve had an unfinished quilt for years that has curved pieces. I got so frustrated I never finished it. This book might be just the thing to help me learn another way to do curves. The fabrics are wonderful! I’d love to win.

    —Pat on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve done the method of ironing freezer paper on background fabric, drawing circle on the freezer paper, cut circle with about 1/2″ seam allowance, make cuts to the circle line, iron under seam allowance, place small drops of fabric glue on seam allowance, adhere to circle fabric, carefully press with iron to dry glue, then sew around circle line very slowly and carefully. WHEW! So time consuming! I need a faster and easier way! I so need to win the fabric and book.

    —Joyce Rejba on November 22, 2013
  • I have used many methods for sewing circles and curves. I do have to agree thought that appliqué, either by hand or machine, is my favorite method.

    —Nancy on November 22, 2013
  • I took a Craftsy course on the sampler quilt for 2012. Two of the blocks used drunkard path pieces. The instructions showed a very easy way to do curved pieces. I am no longer avoiding quilt patterns with circles or curves.

    —Carol Schaumann on November 22, 2013
  • These are just wonderful. I’m putting this book on my wishlist for Christmas.

    —Teresa on November 22, 2013
  • The only curves I’ve sewn was the drunkard’s path in my beginner’s sampler. But I have done appliqued circles which I machined appliqued on… My dream is to make a double wedding ring quilt but haven’t got up the nerve yet.
    Beautiful fabric & love the patterns!

    —Carol Gearey on November 22, 2013
  • I have several projects in mind using circles and have purchased some rulers/templates for making the circles but just haven’t gotten around to starting. I saw a demonstration at a recent quilt show of a sewing machine foot to help sew in curves. That may be a big help. In the meantime, I keep reading quilt magazines and looking at books and patterns for inspiration to get started. Perhaps Nancy’s book will be all the inspiration I need to get going.

    —Gail D. on November 22, 2013
  • I am a new quilter and have not yet tried to sew circles or curves. I have seen several different methods but I am not sure which one I will try….I guess I’m a little timid. Thank you for sharing!

    —Angelia L. on November 22, 2013
  • I pin and clip and pin and clip, measure, measure, measure and so on and on. If there’s an easier way please let me know!

    —Cindy Ehrlich on November 22, 2013
  • I have satin stitched around circles, but Nancy’s book clearly brings circles, and curves to a different level! The quilts are gorgeous!

    —Elizabeth McDonald on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve only done Drunkard’s Path type curves the traditional way…I guess 4 of them together would make a circle .
    Would love to win so thanks for the chance.

    —Janice on November 22, 2013
  • Have been far too intimidated to even think about attempting circles and curves yet. Sounds like this book is just the tool that I need to give me the confidence to try a project using these.

    —Katherine on November 22, 2013
  • Working with circles is one of my goals for 2014. I recently completed Cheryl Arkinson’s Craftsy course of Inset and Applique Circles by Machine and got really excited to work with circles. Then I attended the 2013 Houston International Quilt Festival and saw so many lovely quilts with circles. I bought two bundles of Texas Fats and a template set for three sizes of circles and am ready to go as soon as the holidays are over. I can’t start now because I’m trying to complete Christmas gifts!

    —Virginia in AK on November 22, 2013
  • I have not been brave enough to try circles and curves. Looking forward to giving them a try though. This book looks very interesting.

    —DianeH on November 22, 2013
  • I am a beginner so the circles look very intimidating but I love the patterns shown so I probably will give it a try especially after being given the opportunity to enter the contest to win the book and the fabulously colorful fabrics. Nancy Newport Beach, CA

    —Nancy Clark on November 22, 2013
  • I have only tried drunkard’s path as far a curved piecing. I pinned at the beginning, middle and end with somewhat mixed results.

    —Sherril on November 22, 2013
  • I’m fairly new to quilting so I haven’t tried circles yet but I do want to learn how. Nancy’s book would be a great starting point I’m sure. Thanks for the chance to win her book and fabric bundle!

    —Rhonda D. on November 22, 2013
  • I have really never done circles and curves…although I love the way they look and think they’d be really wonderful on quilts, my fear of making an awful mess of them has stopped me from even trying! My head says "Now, that’s just plain silly!"…but, my heart says "Whoa! We’re not ready to go down that road! No siree!!!"

    —Linda Batchelar on November 22, 2013
  • The only circles I have done were applique. Haven’t tried any pieced ones yet.

    —Becky Davis on November 22, 2013
  • I just did some applique for the first time this past summer using the starch method, then stitching it by hand for a small wall quilt. I was always so afraid to try, but I ended up really enjoying it!

    —Mary on November 22, 2013
  • I have been too timid to try curves in my quilts…I have watched videos on how to piece them, but this sounds more appealing..I put your book on my wish list for Christmas. 😉

    —Nancy Brodeur on November 22, 2013
  • scared! Time is always a factor

    —mararetz on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve grudgingly machine stitched curves and circles, but I like to machine applique circles. This book looks like a winner.

    —Joan Rodriguez on November 22, 2013
  • It all depends on the curvature of the arc.. simple I have done by machine.. but the more complex the arc means I have sewn by hand.

    —Darrell Hardenburg on November 22, 2013
  • I love circles and make them with reverse applique mostly because it is easy. I would love to win the book and find some new methods.

    —CindyM on November 22, 2013
  • I have to admit, I avoid them. I’m never sure how best to cut them out and how to incorporate them into a quilt design. I need this book 🙂

    —Sandra Liming on November 22, 2013
  • I love circles on quilts! My favorite method, for making circles of all sizes, is to sew a print to a piece of muslin, right sides together. Then, scissor-cut notches all the way around the circle, cut a slit in the muslin to turn the circle right side out, and press well. This works really well for hand-applique. Thanks for the chance to win your wonderful fabric giveaway!

    Linda H. on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve been too scared to try sewing circles.

    —Cindy S on November 22, 2013
  • i pin the center, pin the sides and HOPE that everything works!! is there an easier way?

    —Marybeth P on November 22, 2013
  • I have always loved circle quilts but have not had the time to try them until now. I am now a stay at home mother of 4 cats and am looking forward to quilting my brains out. Circle quilts are at the top of the list for sure!

    —Tina on November 22, 2013
  • Please enter me in fabric give away drawing Thank you

    —Chris on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve only been quilting for 3 years and nope, I haven’t even considered doing circles, far to difficult for me. Thanks for the giveaway.

    Sunnybec on November 22, 2013
  • I love circles, am always ready to try new tips!

    —Barbara Powers on November 22, 2013
  • I have done quarter circles as well as curved 9 patch blocks. Really do enjoy the design possibilities with curves. New York Beauty type quilts always catch my attention.

    —Mary D - OKC on November 22, 2013
  • The only circles I’ve made I attached with hand appliqué.

    —Inger on November 22, 2013
  • Like most, I have avoided curves since doing a project many years ago with a million pins and buying a book which even reading the directions for curves was complicated and mind-numbing, time consuming, and totally unsatisfying. I look forward to trying this method, because the quilts are bright and inspiring and BEAUTIFUL!

    —Rosemary Hop on November 22, 2013
  • Circles are something that I’ve been too timid to try, so any method that shows an "easy" way of doing this would be a most welcome read… and the fabrics are beautiful!

    —Karin Doumouras on November 22, 2013
  • After a double wedding ring king size quilt, I said never again
    But maybe ??? your way….could entice me to do those curves again

    —gladys wahl on November 22, 2013
  • I have never tried circles but after seeing Nancy’s new book I would like to try.

    —laurre on November 22, 2013
  • I’m a tad afraid of curves. Every time I try them they usually need ripped out and re-done. I LOVE the Passion Vine above and would like to try it (gulp!). Absolutely lovely fabric.

    —Nancy Eriksen on November 22, 2013
  • I love machine applique, and love the circles and curves, but curves are tricky. Tried multiple methods. Can’t wait to get started aagain.

    —Jan Crawford on November 22, 2013
  • I prefer piecing curves, never had an issue with it. Circles I like to applique with fusible web and satin stitch. This book and fabric look awesome and I really hope I win, thanks for the chance!

    —susan on November 22, 2013
  • I don;t sew many circles however I have sewed them to a piece of interfacing, split the interfacing and turned the piece, and then appliqued the piece in place

    —Louise B. on November 22, 2013
  • Will love to try Nancy books

    —maryann on November 22, 2013
  • "Simple Circles and Quick Curves" has jumped to the top of my "must have books" list. I usually steer away from classes and patterns that require curves and circles. I do a lot of hand applique, but am anxious to learn more about machine applique.

    —Theresa Ingram on November 22, 2013
  • I have never tried to sew a circle.

    —Becky on November 22, 2013
  • I lay my 2 pieces of fabric RSU next to each other with an overlap, then using a rotary cutter, just cut the two fabrics at once. To sew them together, pin the first couple of inches WS together, and stitch with a close stitch (about 1-1.5), slowly and just an inch or two at a time, re-align the cut edges again, sew a little more, re-align edges, etc. I’ve never really done circles except for topical applique or reverse applique. So your book should be a big help!

    —gail myr on November 22, 2013
  • I only tried circles once with my sewing machine and they weren’t very pretty to look at. Would like to try again. Thank you.

    —Eli on November 22, 2013
  • When sewing circles I do the fold center match point method. The only pins I use are to start the first flat end and when sewn past center point I may pin bottom flat end to make sure it matches. Looking forward to the new book and technique you use. The fabrics would be great in any style pattern.

    —Heidi on November 22, 2013
  • Todavía no me atrevo a las curvas, solo hago apliques. Maravilloso regalo para intentarlo. Gracias por tan maravilloso regalo. Translation: Still not dare curves, only I do applique. Wonderful gift for trying. Thanks for such a wonderful gift.

    —susana on November 22, 2013
  • I tend to shy away from circles and curved pieces, but when I do them now, I use fusible applique. Love your quilts!

    —barb on November 22, 2013
  • Your designs are wonderful. I have done some piecing of circles, but have not done a whole quilt. Your designs make a whole quilt more interesting to me.

    —Nancy Angerer on November 22, 2013
  • To be honest, I’ve been to afraid to try and I’ve been quilting for over 20 years. How embarrassing is that.

    —Vickie Graveline on November 22, 2013
  • When I sew circles I prefer to applique. I usually trace the circle on interfacing (sometimes used dryer sheets if they are the right size), then layer it on the fabric’s right side and sew on the traced line. Then trim around the sewn circle about a quarter inch. Finally, cut an X in the facing careful not to cut the fabric and turn. Use a chop stick or similar implement to smooth the outside edge. I would like to try Nancy’s method, though. Thanks for the drawing.

    —Joye on November 22, 2013
  • He cosido círculos pero aún no estoy conforme con el resultado!!! Gracias por publicar este libro, será hermoso tenerlo!!!!!!!!!!!! Besitos!!!!! Translation: I have sewing circles, but I am still not satisfied with the result! Thank you for publishing this book, be beautiful to have it!!!! Kisses!!

    silvia payer on November 22, 2013
  • I take a deep breath and then go very slowly. Circles have always been a challenge but when I actually work them, I am very pleased. Thanks for a new book that tackles all of the questions.

    —Nancy on November 22, 2013
  • I am way too scared to try curves & circles. I am afraid my blocks won’t match up.

    —Penny R on November 22, 2013
  • I am really interested in your techniques for circles. I have avoided them! The book looks great too.

    —Dianne Finnegan on November 22, 2013
  • Guess I have either used a pieced pattern that gives a look of curves or just not done one. Need to learn Nancy’s way to make it look so great. Kathy

    —kathy pfaltzgraff on November 22, 2013
  • I love the circle and curves on the quilts shown. I think it’s time for me to try circles & curves.

    Susan Krahn on November 22, 2013
  • I want to do circles in a quilt but have been too afraid to tackle it. Love the idea of applique’ing the circles. I’ll have to get Nancy’s book.

    —Peggy C on November 22, 2013
  • The only circle blocks I have made have been pieced… lots of pins for some, and a method using no pins. I love circle quilts. I would like to learn more from Nancy Mahoney as I find her patterns beautiful.

    —Susan B. on November 22, 2013
  • I have tried drunkards path, but that is it. Would love to try more methods.

    —Allison C on November 22, 2013
  • I admit it, even though I think circles on quilts are so appealing, I have been too afraid to try them, except a few with fusible web. In an online class I recently tried the slit and turn method on some small circles, so I am happy to learn of Nancy’s technique…maybe this will be the way for me to go.

    —Janie on November 22, 2013
  • Appliqué usually need this book to learn better techniques and the fabric is fabulous

    —Lawana Whaley on November 22, 2013
  • How do I do curves??? I don’t! I did see Jenny Doan’s U tube on doing circles – which fused a circle to the center of a square, and then cut the square into fourths, turn the blocks to give the illusion of circles as in a Drunkards Path, but I never tried it. I’d love to learn more about circles and curves. Your book and video intrigue me, although I am not good at applique either!!!

    —Sue C on November 22, 2013
  • I have been afraid of circles…afraid they would just pucker

    —Darlene Cash on November 22, 2013
  • The easiest way for me to sew a curved line is to try to sew a straight line. Sigh.

    —Kitten With A Whiplash on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve been a bit timid – this book has me excited though!

    —Sandy on November 22, 2013
  • Applique and/or pin like crazy or quilt in the curves once the top is done… those are my usual ways.. I do have a few new things I want to try when I get better at the piecing variety!

    —Tonie Peterson on November 22, 2013
  • I am a beginner, but I love the curvy look! I really would love to learn, and the new book in preview seems smashing!

    —Carolyn Murdoch on November 22, 2013
  • I haven’t done much with curves, but would love to try some more! Thanks for the chance.

    —Elizabeth Tallau on November 22, 2013
  • I have taken a couple of classes for sewing on the curve. I sew on hill side of the fabric and go slow so as not to stretch the fabric. I also have found a new method for circles that I want to try.

    —Linda Yannikos on November 22, 2013
  • I’ve only done a few circles so far and they were appliqued. Love quilts with circles!

    —Pam on November 22, 2013
  • I use the Curvemaster foot to make sewing curves not just possible but fun.

    —Beth T. on November 22, 2013
  • I have used Sharon Schamber’s & Dale Fleming’s methods for sewing circles. Both work equally well, but I think I prefer Sharon’s technique. I’m sure Nancy’s method would work equally well & perhaps be somewhat faster!
    I always love a new book & new fabric is the best!

    —Judy Forkner on November 23, 2013
  • I have typically sewn them raw edge with blanket stitch, I have done a drunkard path where they were cut on the bias made for much easier sewing.

    Sue Stubbings on November 23, 2013
  • I am very excited about this book. I have always been "scared" of circles in any type of quilt I wanted to make. I think this will help me out a lot.

    Misty Y on November 23, 2013
  • I rarely do circles as I am a bit afraid of them. When I do summon up my nerve, I applique them on with a decorative stitch. Thanks for the video tip from Nancy – her book looks great!

    —Colleen on November 23, 2013
  • I usually anything to do with curves, but would love to try this method. Thanks for a chance to win your book!!!

    —Linda on November 23, 2013
  • I have stayed a way from circle quilts because they seemed like a lot of work but now, after reading about Nancy’s book I think I’d like to give it a try.

    —Liz Dicrescenzo on November 23, 2013
  • I most often use raw-edge applique when adding circles to a piece but have used paper-piecing of circles for folded edge. Curves I find harder to do when they are long strips in a design. Would love to learn this technique and the fabrics are gorgeous.

    —dot highter on November 23, 2013
  • Circles are scary, but when they’re done well they look great!

    —Kathy on November 23, 2013
  • I’ve usually used a machine satin stitch around my circles and have pieced curves before. Reading about this technique tells me that there’s a lot to learn yet. This book would be a great resource for new ideas and applications. Love the fabrics. There is no local source for this type fabric where I live.

    —Mary Liz on November 23, 2013
  • I would love to learn how to make circles…..please help.

    —Becky on November 23, 2013
  • Thanks for video, every tip helps!
    The fabric is awesome-very put-together colors!

    —Judy on November 23, 2013
  • I have been too timid (and intimidated) to try this. With all the great tips and ideas, though, I think I may just learn! :o)

    —Piroska on November 23, 2013
  • I typically do not make quilts with curves since I usually stretch the fabric out of shape. I really need help with curved piecing. Looks like a great book and the fabric is wonderful.

    —Jill on November 23, 2013
  • I applique circles and like to wallpapercut for curves

    —kkf on November 23, 2013
  • I’ve only done raw edged circles before. I sew them different ways; zig-zag around edge or straight stitch inside the edge.

    —Sunnye Sherman on November 23, 2013
  • I’ve always been fascinated with circles and curves in a quilt….i love them! I’ve made several quilts and jackets too and put in blocks with circles and 1/2 circles. Sewing circles and curves does not require "sweat" OR "headaches" it does require the sewer to slow down, relax and pay attention. …it is much easier than you think!

    Joyce B Hoover on November 23, 2013
  • I have done hand appliqué using the starch method, Nancy’s method looks like it would be a lot faster and also fun to do. The quilts in her new book are beautiful.

    —Geri Running on November 23, 2013
  • This looks like a fabulous book to own and the fabric collection giveaway is also fabulous. What fun if were to win this. Have done circles but not very well. Your tricks and tips are most appreciated to expand my skills.

    —Lydia on November 23, 2013
  • I’ve never been confident enough to try! I’d sure like to, tho!

    —Vicky C. on November 23, 2013
  • I’ve only put a few circles on my quilts, using Eleanor Burns method with fusible interfacing. Love the quilts and fabrics.

    —Sandy Curtis on November 23, 2013
  • The quilts featured here are beautiful! I would love to use this book. Thank you for the awesome opportunity to win. I fairly comfortable sewing curves, and I’ve appliqued circles. But I’m always looking for more tips on how to do it better and faster!

    —Pam on November 23, 2013
  • I have not been brave enough to try circles. Looks like this may be the time!

    —Jayne on November 23, 2013
  • the few times I put circles or curves was applique. I dont want to do curves in patchwork, seems like too much effort, and I have enough fun with straight lines! But I really like seeing the curves in a quilt, so this book sounds like it might be the answer to having the curves and still having fun.

    —Madeline on November 23, 2013
  • With curves, pinning in the middle and on the ends and easing as I sew. With circles, app

    —DebbieW on November 23, 2013
  • I typically sew my circles with a 3/8″ seam. I love the way it looks better than just appliqueing it on. I learned to sew circles years ago when I had to make my own clothes as a teenager. Circles are so versatile and make for such an interesting quilt. I love them!

    —Gena Raban on November 23, 2013
  • I have used just about every method of piecing and appliqueing circles at one time or another but it depends on the purpose (ie, tote bag, wall hanging etc.) as to which one I choose. I have not tried using iron safe templates, yet. I love Nancy’s "Blue Bayou” quilt and would love to win the book & fabric & try her technique.

    —Kathy S on November 23, 2013
  • I do like to sew circles, but they tend to be appliqued on rather than curved piecing. Would like to try a bulls-eye quilt block. I think circles and curves are really calming on a quilt. Thanks for the giveaway!

    —Sandra on November 23, 2013
  • I use the technique much like this.

    —Karen Jones on November 23, 2013
  • I have not tried circles or curves yet; they sure are intriguing. Your quilts are great examples of why.

    —Janie on November 23, 2013
  • I would LOVE to be able to make circles with confidence. In the past I cut out newspaper circles and basted fabric to it. I keep hoping for a better way. I saw a vendor at a sewing expo who had a tool set that made circles but could not afford her tool. I love the way circles and curves look in quilts and would really like to be able to easily add them to my things-I-know-how-to-do list. The new book looks great. If I can get a copy I can teach this technique to my friends in my quilt group, Therapeutic Quilters in Enumclaw, WA. Thanks for considering me as a winner for the new book!

    Sincerely,
    Valerie McKay

    —Valerie Jones McKay on November 24, 2013
  • I am newbie to circles, but with Nancy’s technique, it looks easy! I’d love to win the beautiful fabric.

    —Donna Myers on November 24, 2013
  • Have been way too timid to do circles! But they look so awesome in quilts!

    —Marilu Howard on November 24, 2013
  • I’ve pieced curves, but there are lots of registration lines, lots of straight pins, and careful sewing (exhausting!)

    I like to make circles by using templar plastic templates, basting the seam allowance on the back, pull the thread together to make a nice circle, starch the edges, then either machine, or hand applique.

    Nancy’s book is full of great looking patterns!

    —Crazy Cuban on November 24, 2013
  • I’ve sewn circles different ways; traditional sewing, fusible applique, interfaced backed circles. I like the glueing hint for placing the circle on the background.

    —Mary Ann on November 24, 2013
  • I have never tried circles in my quilts. I like your idea of using appliqué to create blocks that look patched. Thanks for sharing your tip to center circles.

    —Jamie Todhunter on November 24, 2013
  • I have not tried making a quilt with circles yet but I love the look and want to try making one soon.

    —Judy on November 24, 2013
  • I love the look of circles on a quilt, but I’m really scared of them too.

    —Becky on November 24, 2013
  • I love the look of the circle quilts, but haven’t tried one yet. The fabric bundle is lovely…..who can resist buying fabric, too many quilt patterns and so little time. My grandkids love getting my quilts as gifts. Thanks for the tips, love reading and learning new ideas.

    —Cynthia Fedak on November 24, 2013
  • I usually hand applique or machine applique circles in my quilts.

    —Mary Johnston on November 24, 2013
  • I haven’t sewn circles yet. I’m not very brave yet.

    —Laura on November 24, 2013
  • I love the circle quilts. This book will be on my wish list for Christmas. The blue one is so striking. I can hardly wait to see the book.

    Connie on November 24, 2013
  • I have seen several quilts with circles that had "flat" areas on them. Being relatively new to quilting I assumed quilting circles would be very difficult
    and beyond my abilities. Simple Circles and Quick Curves has the information I need to be able to make perfect circles in my quilts. Thanks for making it available.

    —Sherri on November 24, 2013
  • I am new to quilting but not to sewing. Circles and curves scare me to death. I will watch your video for help. Thanks

    —Ellen on November 25, 2013
  • I have always drawn around a plate.This way sounds so much easier – can’t wait to try.

    —Lee on November 25, 2013
  • Love all Nancy’s patterns. Can hardly wait to see book and try her appliqué method.

    —Penny Ford on November 25, 2013
  • I have never tried a circle quilt; but after seeing samples from this book; I definetly want to try one!

    —Elizabeth P. on November 25, 2013
  • Nancy taught me how to machine applique. It’s only fitting that she now teach me how to make circles and curves.

    —Laura Austin on November 25, 2013
  • I’ve been a chicken and have yet to try circles….but with Nancy’s help, I’m sure it would be a breeze!

    —Alison Aiton on November 25, 2013
  • I have not tried curves or cicle yet. I want to make a Drunkers Path soon. this book would really help me tackle it

    JOSEPHINE on November 25, 2013
  • I am a fairly new quilter, so anything to make it easier is great. Would love to win. Keep up the good work Martingale.
    Nancyfromaus

    —Nancy Boyd on November 25, 2013
  • Ha Too timid to try. Maybe your free book would help. Got my fingers crossed.

    —sharon on November 25, 2013
  • I’ve yet to incorporate circles in my quilts, but your book & these gorgeous new fabrics are definitely inspiration!

    —Gail on November 25, 2013
  • I have not tried curves yet. I would love to see how her technique works.

    —Loriann Fish on November 25, 2013
  • Would love this! 🙂

    —Carol Oshiro on November 26, 2013
  • I have always been afraid of making circles or curves. I have tried then but it always ends up in the throwaway bin

    —Carol on November 26, 2013

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