SO many ways!: finishing binding on quilts

Binding options from Happy EndingsIf you’ve ever been stuck when it comes to stitching binding, welcome to the club! Think about it—you might make 20 (or many more) of the same block for each quilt you create, but you’re only sewing on quilt binding once per project. Practice makes perfect—and that’s considerably less practice!

In 1988, a quilting teacher with a dream to publish a book about her binding techniques got her chance—and she called her book Happy Endings. Since then, that teacher, Mimi Dietrich, has become a nationally renowned teacher and the bestselling author of numerous quilt books. Her “happy endings” have led to many happy beginnings.

There doesn’t seem to be any ending at all for Happy Endings, now back in print by popular demand—for the fourth time! From super-quick to beautifully elaborate bindings, Mimi’s book ensures that you can finish buying finishing books. Just take a look at the different  techniques included:

  • sewing binding on quiltsFinishing edges without binding
  • Finishing rounded corners
  • Making imitation binding
  • Appliquéing edges to a border
  • Working with sculpted edges
  • Finishing edges with backing
  • Finishing with overlapped corners
  • Finishing with mitered corners
  • Single- vs. double-fold binding
  • Straight-grain vs. bias binding
  • Determining binding yardage
  • Cutting bindings (straight-grain and bias)
  • Continuous bias binding
  • Cutting special fabrics for bindings (stripes, plaids, etc.)
  • Scrappy, scalloped, and sculpted bindings
  • Grandmother’s Flower Garden edges
  • Adding trims, cording, piping, prairie points, lace, and ruffles

(And the above is not a complete list!)

We’re thrilled to have Mimi as a guest blogger today at Stitch This! She’s sharing a brilliant idea that many of us have seen her teach at Quilt Market. If you’re puzzled about how to fold and sew corners when sewing binding on quilts, you’ll love Mimi’s make-and-take paper binding below. For a concrete example of Mimi’s techniques, just make a paper binding for yourself; then tuck it right into the pages of your copy of Happy Endings!


Mimi DietrichThe Disney princesses have their dream-come-true stories, but I have Happy Endings!

I wrote my first quilting book, Happy Endings, in 1988. At the time, I thought it would be my only book. That was 25 years and 16 books ago! Happy Endings had been out of print for a few years, but it has just been re-released for its 25th anniversary. I’m so thrilled—it’s amazing for a quilting book to be in print that long. Many quilters have learned how to apply borders and bindings, and have finished their quilts, because of this book!

I also had another exciting event happen this year: I was named the International Association of Professional Quilters Teacher of the Year for 2013! I have been teaching quilting for more than 30 years, so I thought I would share some Happy Endings tricks with you.

Grandmother's Flower Garden quilt bindingThere’s a funny story behind how I wrote the book based on a class. One of the first quilting classes I taught was called “Happy Endings”—a workshop to teach quilters how to make binding and finish the edges of their quilts. Once I knew I was going to write the book, I wanted to make sure that I included every detail. In a class, if you forget to mention a detail there’s a good chance that your students will ask questions and get you back on track. (I have learned a lot about teaching from my students throughout the years!) So one day I took my son’s Fisher Price tape recorder to class and captured all of the information I needed to write the book. The rest is history! If you’re a teacher who has thought about writing a pattern or a book, try recording a class—your students will help you get the step-by-step details organized.

My favorite tools for teaching techniques from Happy Endings are little paper quilt corners. I have used these in classes of ten students and in lectures for 100 quilters. The “audience participation” helps everyone remember the basic folding techniques. Plus, they have a souvenir to refer to when they put binding on their quilts. They can keep the paper samples in their book! You can make your own, following the instructions below.

How to Fold Binding on a Quilt Corner

1. Cut a 3″ square of paper (scrapbooking paper works so much better than the construction paper I used in 1988) and a 1″ x 6″ strip of coordinating paper. Use a glue stick to attach the strip to the top left of the square. This represents a 1″ folded binding on the corner of a quilt top. Use a pencil to draw stitches across the top, stopping ¼" before the right edge.

1" folded quilt binding

 

2. Fold the strip diagonally so that it extends straight up from the right side of the quilt corner.

Fold the binding strip diagonally

 

3. Fold the strip down so that it matches the right edge of the quilt corner. (In the photo below, the strip is lifted a bit so that you can see the fold at the corner, but when folded flat the strip should align with the right edge of the square.) Add some “stitches” to show where to sew.

Fold the binding strip down

 

With these easy folded papers, you have a sample to keep in your copy of Happy Endings (pages 46–47). The crisp folds in the paper will help you remember how to fold the corners on bindings.

I also use paper squares to demonstrate how to finish the edges by folding the back of the quilt to the front to look like binding.

Finishing Edges with Backing—Mitered Corners

1. Cut a 4″ square of scrapbooking paper and a 3″ coordinating square. Align the smaller square with one corner of a larger square, wrong sides together, so that you have 1″ of the larger square extending. Glue in place. The smaller square represents the front of the quilt and the larger square is the back of the quilt.

2. Fold the corner of the backing squarely over the corner of the front. The secret to success here is to relax and leave a little space between the front and the fold, so that the miter will form smoothly later. Tuck the point under the front quilt square.

Fold the corner

Tuck the point

 

3. Fold the 1″ of backing in half along the sides. The raw edge should match the quilt front.

Fold binding in half

 

4. Fold the backing once more to cover the front with “binding” and form a miter at the corner. Keep this sample in the book (page 27).

Fold again to form a mitered corner

 

Teaching quilting has been a dream-come-true for me—and it all started with Happy Endings! I love writing books so that quilters can learn from my step-by-step instructions, but there’s nothing as wonderful as teaching a class in person. It’s exciting to interact with students and their fabrics, to have fun and enjoy the experiences that quilting brings. I am always thrilled when a quilter tells me she used Happy Endings to finish one of her quilts!

Mimi, thanks for sharing your make-and-takes for binding—what a great way to remember how all the folding goes!


Happy EndingsWhat’s your favorite way to give your quilts “happy endings”? Share your ideas in the comments and you could win a copy of the Happy Endings eBook! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.

Can’t wait? Download the Happy Endings eBook for free right away when you purchase the printed book at our website.

Comments are closed for this post.

Thanks to all who entered the drawing! The randomly chosen winner is Stella, who writes:

“The end of making a quilt is like the end of a movie for me. I want it to be memorable. After all, a lot of work has been put into getting to this point. I’ve added a satin ruffle. I’ve added lace with lavender ribbon weaved through and tied into bows in the corners – adorable. I’ve added prairie points. I would just love to have a book that would introduce me to new ideas. I haven’t made many quilts, but just wrapping the edges in a standard binding seems just okay to me. Kind of like framing a Picasso in a dollar store frame. A finished quilt is a masterpiece – frame it like one. :)”

Stella, we’ll email you about your prize. Congratulations!

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276 Comments

  • I am an old traditional, doubled, sewn to the front, turned and hand-stitched to the back type quilter. I Have "birthed" quilts and made scalloped borders, brought the back to the front as binding, and rounded corners but I keep returning to the traditional. I see that Mimi’s book offers so much more than what I know. I need this book.

    Michelle Harrison on June 25, 2013
  • WOW, that’s AWESOME! I’ve only bound quilts in two different ways; this is fantastic! It’s on my Wish List. 🙂

    —Lauren aka Giddy99 on June 25, 2013
  • Wow…can’t wait to try some of your techniques.

    —Jeri on June 25, 2013
  • My bindings are usually a different color than my outermost border. However, I like to include cornerstones on the outmost border, that match the binding’s color. It makes the binding appear to jut into the border.

    —Bev in TX on June 25, 2013
  • I prefer very small bindings, mostly 1/4″ or less, but I’ld love to give other methods a try
    Thank you for the chance to win
    Brigitte

    Brigitte Baierl on June 25, 2013
  • Being a beginner quilter binding really freaks me out. Sounds like Happy Endings would be a great help. Hope I win

    —Cheri Johnson on June 25, 2013
  • I’m pretty traditional and machine stitch my binding to the front, flip it over and hand stitch it to the back. I’d love to try something with scalloped edges one of these days.

    —MaryBeth on June 25, 2013
  • I usually just do traditional binding. I love to sit and do the handwork.
    I would like to try some new things. I have a grandmother’s flower garden that will need to be bound.

    —DeAnn Oliekan on June 25, 2013
  • What a wonderful give a way. This would be wonderful to learn all the different ways to bind. I have only made a few quilts so far. I have been using the traditional way, like the first sample above.

    —Lori Smanski on June 25, 2013
  • Would love to have this book! I’m still ‘terrified’ to make scalloped edges!

    —Tracey Young on June 25, 2013
  • I love to make quilts, but I always have trouble with the bindings.
    This book may finally cure my fears!! Thanks for the chance to win.

    —Rhonda Desgranges on June 25, 2013
  • I hope I win! I hope I win! Beautiful and very helpful!

    —Schelia Rabalais on June 25, 2013
  • I use the first method shown with the paper model. My mother often folded the backing over to make the binding.

    —Joan on June 25, 2013
  • I usually use a continuous bias strip for most of my quilts. I really love it when I can find a stripe to use when I am cutting the bias strips. Would love to have a copy of Mimi’s book to delve in and explore other ways to "end" my quilts.

    —Nancy on June 25, 2013
  • where has this book been, all of my life?

    —Terry Pitcock on June 25, 2013
  • Although I have been sewing since I was about nine, I started quilting only about a year ago. I just turned sixty, so i guess you can say i got a late start. My mother is teaching me, and I have only made three quilts so far. She has taught me to do binding only one way so far. I would really love to learn some of the ways that I saw in your book. Thanks for the chance to win a copy!

    —Kathy Gutierrez on June 25, 2013
  • My only way to bind a quilt is double fold, sew by machine, turn over and hand stitch. I so need this book! Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Therese on June 25, 2013
  • Do traditional methods but am always open to new and better methods. Would love to have this book.

    —LaVonne Crouse on June 25, 2013
  • I have only made a few quilts and the "endings" have all been pretty plain. But I am really looking forward to adding rick-rack or piping or prairie points to my current quilt!

    Linda Pawlak on June 25, 2013
  • I do it like the first example. I plan to try the second example. I would love to win this book! I would love to do scalloped bindings.

    Sallie on June 25, 2013
  • Just found you on the blog tour! Thankfully! Gonna purchase and download Happy Endings…my old , age84, mother is living with me now and has never learned how to end her quilts happily…so…one more try with the book, the download and paper examples…thank you!

    —L Carolyn ghearing on June 25, 2013
  • HELLO,LOVE+USE YOUR IDEAS THAT YOU POSTED!
    FOR A CHILD’S QUILT,I RECENTLY USED JUMBO RIC RAC BETWEEN THE FRONT LAYER OF THE QUILT+THE BACKING.IT TURNED OUT SO NEAT!THANKS SO FOR YOUR INSPIRATION AND THIS GIVEAWAY TOO!

    —LINDA on June 25, 2013
  • I just took a class on quilting for beginners and it talked about bindings. This would be such a help! thanks for the opportunity 🙂

    —Martha-Ann Wilkie on June 25, 2013
  • I have a quilt top my best friend made after double knee surgery. I would love to learn how to bind it . This would be a marvelous helping hand to finish her quilt with your book. Keep up the wonderful journey writing more books.

    Karen

    —Karen Smith on June 25, 2013
  • I use traditional binding, but when I stop 1/4″ for the end, I stitch at a 45 degree angle up to the corner. Really helps make a nice corner.

    —Carmen on June 25, 2013
  • I am always looking for unique ideas for a Happy Ending….very interested

    —Bunny on June 25, 2013
  • I like that how-to for mitering. It makes perfect sense and looks doable. As someone who is currently struggling with putting prairie points on a quilt, I could use help with a happy ending.

    Joanna on June 25, 2013
  • What an awesome book to have! I would LOVE to own this. I have only done traditional straight binding to date but absolutely love curved binding and zigzags. I am not confident in my skills yet to do those others yet but very much want to do something other than the traditional binding on my quilts.

    —VickiT on June 25, 2013
  • I am pretty happy with the mitered corner technique. I must say that using bias cut binding makes all the difference for me. I am lucky to be guild friends with Susan Cleveland of piped binding fame and love to add her technique for a special bit of color at the binding. I’d sure like help o those scalloped edge finishes.

    —Kathy on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite way to make binding is to cut 2 1/2″ strips and apply like the first paper binding example. The scalloped method is one that I think is very pretty and want to use on a 30s quilt in the future.

    —Vicki Sprain on June 25, 2013
  • I’m still struggling with quilt binding… HELP! :-0

    —Monika on June 25, 2013
  • I face my art quilts

    —Katherine on June 25, 2013
  • I would LOVE to win this, I have trouble with bindings, and this book looks like it could be the answer I am looking for. Thanks for the opportunity to win.

    —Janet on June 25, 2013
  • I have two methods I use the most – one is to use the backing folded over the edges – sides first then top & bottom. I also do the 2 1/4″ strip ironed in half and attached at sides first then top & bottom. I have done the solid strip all around but find it too bulky for my use since I am not as comfortable with it. I do find the hand-stitching invisible very relaxing to do!

    —Cindy Wienstroer on June 25, 2013
  • I have the longarm quilter bind my quilts because I can’t seem to make my binding look good.

    —Kim Waknitz on June 25, 2013
  • I use the normal (ordinary) binding, but usually a little wider than most people–maybe 1/2 inch or 5/8’s. I vary the size depending on how large the quilt is–wider bindings on a king for instance. Can’t believe it’s been 25 years since this book first came out! My copy has had a lot of use over that time!

    —Donna on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve only done basic, traditional binding, both machine stitched and by hand. This book looks like a real treasure to have on hand for taking it to the next level. And the paper samples trick is just plain ingenious. Thanks for sharing!

    Jane Cisneros on June 25, 2013
  • Ohhh, I love it! I wish I’d had this book twenty years ago. I’d love to win it.

    —Judy on June 25, 2013
  • I have been using "traditional" continuous binding methods, but just recently tried an angular quilt with several sharp corners, so made the binding on the bias – silly me! I loved it. I have sewn the top and bottom together like a sandwich also, if it was a simple quilt for charity and such.

    My favorite happy ending is giving the quilt to someone who truly appreciates it, no matter what the binding is!

    —Donna on June 25, 2013
  • I always do traditional bindings but I would love to learn some different techniques. You never know when something different might be better.

    —Susan Griffith on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve been trying to decide how I want to do the sashing for a baby quilt that I will be starting soon. Just looking at these photos has given me inspiration. Now if I just had a book that would help me with the binding….!!

    —CarleneT on June 25, 2013
  • Finally…..what a wonderful book on binding! My bindings in the past have been less than perfect. Hence, I now have unfinished projects because I’m afraid to attempt another "less than beautiful" edge. I really need this book with it’s directions (and encouragement). Thanks for the wonderful give-away!

    —Cheryl Sedlar on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve always used the first method, as shown with your paper samples, which is an AWESOME idea! I’d love to try some of the other ones, one of these days…..

    —Lynette Root on June 25, 2013
  • Another timely offerering, my binding takes too long, I want to get it done faster, better, smarter so I can move on to my next project. Thanks for giveaway, tips, pictures (going to get my origami paper and make a sample set).
    Cheers!

    —Carol on June 25, 2013
  • I just found a method to create a binding sewing it down with machine – http://www.52quilts.com/2012/05/tuesday-tutorial-susies-magic-binding.html – although I haven’t tried it, I’m looking forward to finishing the baby quilt I’m currently working on to give it a shot. Otherwise, it’s back to invisible stitches, and a few days of work sewing the binding down by hand.

    —Susan Burney on June 25, 2013
  • I have two ways I give a quilt project "happy endings". The first is
    with attaching the binding and the second is folding top under backing
    and machine stitching to complete. Mary Arline

    —Mary Arline Smith on June 25, 2013
  • What an awesome post! Beautiful pictures and a great tutorial using scrapbook paper. Who would have thought? I have bound my quilts for almost 20 years by sewing the binding on to the BACK of the quilt and bringing it to the front and MACHINE stitching it down using a simple stitch (either zigzag or a curved/serpentine type). My thread matches the binding and I try to keep the bobbin thread (showing up on the back) to match the backing. No, it isn’t perfect on the back, but it is neat and who really pays attention to the back? I don’t enter quilt shows!

    Debby Kratovil on June 25, 2013
  • My happy ending is to sign the quilt and send it to its new home.

    Nita on June 25, 2013
  • I’m afraid I’m not very creative when binding my quilts. I always stick to a double-folded binding, machine stitched, then stitched down by hand using an invisible applique stitch. I could certainly use a book like Mimi’s to inspire me and give me some new alternatives to my regular method.

    —Cyndi on June 25, 2013
  • My "Happy Ending" would be to make my hand sewing look as good as my sister does. She has only made 2 quilts, of course they are perfect and her bindings are the same perfection. The best part of bindings for me is the "last" stitch…LOL

    —Bonnie Mitchell on June 25, 2013
  • I love to use a stripe binding whenever possible on my quilts. It makes the edges look like candy!

    —Amy on June 25, 2013
  • I have done only one type of binding. I stitch my binding 1/4 inch on the front and fold over and hand stitch on the back.

    —Holly on June 25, 2013
  • Traditional binding is what i have always done. Would love to learn
    other ways of binding.

    —Elizabeth Lee on June 25, 2013
  • I am brand new to quilting and this would definitely be a welcome addition to my library.

    —Lori N on June 25, 2013
  • I have been quilting for over 50 years. with the exception of one backing turned over to the front, I use traditional double fold, sewn to the front and folded over to the back. I always sewed the binding down by hand until I started doing a lot of donation quilts about 15 years ago. I decided there was more need in the world to have quilts done so started to sew the binding down by machine stitching in the ditch from the front. Adds up to a lot of time saved to work on the next quilt.

    I love stripe fabrics cut on the bias for bindings. I use it a lot on donation quilts. It truly is a ‘happy ending’!

    Karol

    —Karol on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve always done things the old fashioned way too (like Michelle, your first commenter), doubled over, stitched to front, folded over and handstitched to back. Time consuming, but it always looks good. HOWEVER – I love the idea of finishing the edges with the backing that Mimi provided instructions for and I’m definitely going to try that out on my next little mini! Awesome idea. Thanks Mimi!

    —Sherryl on June 25, 2013
  • I am a relatively new quilter, and I was taught to use a "pillowcase" method for finishing my quilts. I have not as yet learned how to finish a quilt with a binding, but I would love to learn. I thought I would need to take a class, but this book appears to have clear step by step instructions and pictures for all kinds of bindings.

    —Karen on June 25, 2013
  • I have been machine binding lately. Too many quilts to get done and not enough time to handsew the binding down. Thanks for the paper binding ideas and a chance to win.

    —Debby on June 25, 2013
  • I have a copy of the original printing of Mimi’s book and would love to have an updated version.

    Once my binding is sewn on I swap out my thread and replace it with fusible thread. I then choose a large and long zig-zag stitch and zig-zag over the edge of the quilt on all 4 sides. It is then a snap to bring the binding over and press it which results in the fusible thread fusing the binding to the quilt. I can then stitch down the second edge of the binding using any technique I like and not have to worry about pins.

    paula.thequilter on June 25, 2013
  • I do a double fold binding, handstitched down on the back about 99% of the time. I am a stickler for bindings that are well done — nothing worse than a beautiful quilt with messy binding! I would love to have this book to give me ideas for new techniques to try. Thanks for the chance!

    —Lisa Marie on June 25, 2013
  • As a beginner, I’ve only tried a binding on potholders (I’ve mostly done rag quilts up to now) but I have blocks done for a quilt that will need to be finished and this book sounds like the perfect place for me to start on doing things properly!

    —Judy S on June 25, 2013
  • I always do traditional bindings. I’m a bit of a perfectionist so I like the look of bindings that are hand sewn with blind stitches. I would like to try a cute decorative machine stitch for the binding on a baby or child’s quilt but I’ve never seen a method that would ensure the stitching line would appear even on both sides. All of the ones I’ve seen are stitched from the top along the edge of the binding. The top looks great. On the back, though, the stitching line looks like it wanders rather than staying right on the "ditch".

    —Theresa on June 25, 2013
  • I love a nice crochet binding!

    —Debra Lee on June 25, 2013
  • I like sewing a decorative simple stitch on or next to the binding on children’s quilts to make it a little more whimsical. I also like making a scrappy binding.

    —Lynn DeShon on June 25, 2013
  • HELP! I have a hand appliqued Sunbonnet Sue that has been around since 1999 (one year before my grand daughter was born) I put Ice cream cone borders on it. It is still unfinished because I am stumped on how to make the binding on such severe angles. I would love to finish this quilt with the help of this book.

    —Cynthia Wood on June 25, 2013
  • Great Ideas! Thank you for the chance to win the book.

    —Janet T on June 25, 2013
  • I’m usually stuck in a rut or should I say -ditich – mitered corners and stitch in the ditch. something new would be fun to try

    Sharon on June 25, 2013
  • This amazing book reminds us that we are never too experienced or too old to learn new techniques. I have recently returned to the UK and miss my quilting bee sharing ideas. I would love to have this book to finish some UFOs. Keep on writing these wonderful books.

    —Ursula Garrow-Kennedy on June 25, 2013
  • I use traditional mitred corner bindings mostly. Recently I tried bias binding and really liked the result on a curved edge table runner.

    DianeH on June 25, 2013
  • I generally do the traditional binding, double-fold, and hand stitched to the back, but have done several other "varieties" also. Would love to win the book and add more to my tool box!

    Bari on June 25, 2013
  • I use the old fashioned, turn-the-binding and hemstitch it to the backing. I would love to win this book to learn some new ways though!

    —Barbara Pricola on June 25, 2013
  • I am a newbie so I have only used folded over binding. I am anxious to try other methods though! Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Sheryl Miller on June 25, 2013
  • My only way to bind a quilt is double fold, sew by machine, turn over and hand stitch, saying a prayer for the recipient. I can certainly use the giveaway. Congratulations on be selectef as the Professional Quilters Teacher of the year for 2013.Recently I sewed a piece of ric rac betweeen the quilt and the backing and really like the finished look.I so need this book! Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Connie Douty on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite ending method is to either sew the double fold binding on the back, folding it to the front (as in the second paper method) or fold the backing to the front (second paper method)and then topstitching the edge of the binding on the front with either a decorative stitch or a straight stitch very close to the edge. This is very fast and durable, especially if it’s going to used and washed a lot, like potholders, placemeats or baby quilts. This book is awesome, I’m so glad it’s been reprinted and I hope I win. Thanks for the opportunity!

    —susan on June 25, 2013
  • I always do a traditional 1/4″ binding mainly because I’m not real creative. I think this book would be a great way to learn some new methods.

    —Jill on June 25, 2013
  • I have always done a traditional binding and some bias. I have seen examples of more elaborate methods but I have not tried them because I don’t know how exactly they work. I would love to try piping or prairie points.

    —Diane on June 25, 2013
  • My FAVORITE way to give a quilt a "Happy Ending" is by hand sewing the binding down with a ladder stitch. It disappears! The special finishing is a ‘labor of love’. Sometimes I’m happy to finish the project and other times I’m sad to see it go. But I know I would sure enjoy seeing all the wonderful ways Mimi suggests to finish a quilt!

    —Christel Richard on June 25, 2013
  • I recently tried a two fabric binding that looks like binding with a flat piping accent and allows you to sew it all by machine. It may be my new favorite maethod.

    —Karen A on June 25, 2013
  • I stop stitching 1/4 " before the edge and give it a 45 degree fold.

    —Claire on June 25, 2013
  • I usually stitch to the front and hand sew to the back, but if the quilt is going to get a lot of hard wear (as for a child) I glue baste to the back and stitch in the ditch on the front to catch the binding on the back. I would love to find new, fun ways to finish quilts! Thanks for the opportunity !

    —Ann on June 25, 2013
  • Wow! I didn’t realize that there are so many different ways to do bindings. I usually just do a simple binding with mitered corners, would love to have a copy of this book.
    Thank You

    April Mull on June 25, 2013
  • My Happy Ending is sometimes I will cut pieces of yarn and tie them in the corners of each square if the quilt I am working has a square block pattern. I have even done this with circles and sewed them in the middle and with flowers so they look like the pistol of the flower is sticking out the top of the flowers. Thanks for the opportunity.

    —Lynn G. on June 25, 2013
  • I have always used the traditional binding and now am eager to use the "Finished edges with backing-Mitered Corners" on my next project.

    —peaceful quilter on June 25, 2013
  • I have only used the traditional method as in the first illustration in this post. Would love to learn other ways. This sounds like an amazing book.

    —Karon Henderson on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite part to my happy ending is when I’m done! I like sewing the binding on by hand, so depending on the size, it could take me an hour or several. Gets old sitting up till 3 am because it has to be done and wrapped the next day.

    —Heather on June 25, 2013
  • My favourite part of making a quilt is doing the binding, because it means I am nearly done and I can go on and get started on another one! I love every part of the quilting process, but I especially relish the ending!

    —Beryl Rasmussen on June 25, 2013
  • I love to use stripes on the bias. I also like scallop edges too !

    —Karen on June 25, 2013
  • I usually make the border, part of the binding, so when I am down with the quilt, I can fold it over to the back and I sew it down by hand. I would love to learn how to do better and different types of bindings.

    Debbie

    Debbie St. Germain on June 25, 2013
  • Loved the idea of using paper to demonstrate the different binding techniques. Would love to win a copy.

    —carneyes on June 25, 2013
  • This book seems like the best thing for me. I’ve made a few quilts but always struggle with the binding. I need this book!

    —Ann Boehm on June 25, 2013
  • my endings are ho-hum … stitch to the front, tack to the back. i’d much prefer alternate ways to the end game; just as there’s no right way or wrong, there’s gotta be other ways to finish off! this book gives me lots of ideas! thanx for the chance to win a copy!

    ritainalaska on June 25, 2013
  • I’m a non-traditional person who makes traditional bindings. LOL Oh my goodness, I really NEED this book! ☺ Thanks a bunch for the chance to win!

    —Maree on June 25, 2013
  • I feel that whatever I quilt, large or small has a "Happy Ending" when it is being used by the person I intended it for. I am still a beginner quilter, and learn so much from your emails. Bindings just scare the wits out of me, but I think I will make the paper bindings to remind me of how easy it can be. I’m working on table runners now for Christmas presents, and I could really put "Happy Endings" to good use. Thanks for the opportunity to win it!

    —Lorraine Ernst on June 25, 2013
  • Making and sewing the binding is the part I don’t like very much. As I always make large quilts, it’s quite a job. I alway make double bindings. I have my paper example of the folded corner (in case I forget how to do it !).
    The last quilt I finished is an apple core, so I will have to make a bais double binding. I’m not looking forward to it.

    —Agnes on June 25, 2013
  • I machine stitch my binding and then hand stitch to the back. This is my way of knowing the quilt is DONE!

    —KarenInTucson on June 25, 2013
  • I usually use double fold binding, sewn on front (with mitered corners), turn to the back and hand stitch down. I love using striped fabrics for bindings. I also like to use a narrow flange or piping as additional decoration. I am making a Dear Jane quilt and really, really need to learn to do the scalloped edge binding. Mimi’s book would be a perfect teacher (as she is!). And, if I am lucky enough to win the book, she is having a book signing at our LQS so I can get her to sign it! I would be so thrilled. Thanks for offering it.

    —Sue on June 25, 2013
  • I would love to have this great book!
    Thanks.

    —Valerie A. Clark on June 25, 2013
  • Definitely a need for the library 🙂

    —Sue Robison on June 25, 2013
  • I would love to win "Happy Endings". I am always looking for ways to improve on my binding technique.
    Yvonne

    Yvonne on June 25, 2013
  • I like stitching down the back of the binding by hand, while sitting in front of the TV together with the rest of the family.

    —Sandra S on June 25, 2013
  • Yes, Yes, Yes, I want the Happy Endings e-book. I am a tried and true non-binder of quilts, I have never been able to make them look nice. So I just cut the batting or middle section to leave a 1/2 seam line to iron and fold in and stitch around. I would Love, Love, Love to take a class and use all the ideas in her book. Thank you Mimi for making a book that was long forgotten available again for those of us with a phobia of binding quilts. Please, Please, Please if you ever come to Bozeman Mt. I will be the first in line for your class. Best success for your teaching and writing, keep them coming for the next generation of students to learn to bind and finish their quilts……..

    —Lori M. on June 25, 2013
  • My happy ending is when I finish a quilt and give it to one of the grandchildren. It delights me so much to see the child carrying it around. Would love to win this book . Thanks

    —Margaret Schindler on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve been playing around with binding lately. I really like turning the backing to the front (double), mitering the corners, and stitching it by machine. Then, using single fold on walhangings and turning envelope style are other favorite ways to finish small projects.

    Kris on June 25, 2013
  • Oh how I’d love to win this – I’m a self-taught quilter with quite a few UFO’s because I got hung up at the binding stage. My son’s high school graduation quilt has never been completely finished because I didn’t know about bindings or the internet either (I used king-sized sheets for backing and "enveloped" the quilt, then hand embroidered an edging). Since he’s in his 30’s, married & has an 8 yr. old son, I think it’s time I learned how to correctly finish off his project! He wouldn’t think I’m such a nut case if I presented him with his finally finished gift! I’ve made things for my grandson Lincoln, but I know my son would treasure that first thing I started way back when!

    —Rosemary Hop on June 25, 2013
  • Have only finished 2 quilts and in the process of finishing another. Just have done traditional bindings, very simple. LOVED her illustration with the paper – have them printed out and will definitely use her technique. I can see right now that her book is a must, if I’m not the lucky winner, will buy it. Thank you for the opportunity to win such a fantastic book.

    —Shirley on June 25, 2013
  • The end of making a quilt is like the end of a movie for me. I want it to be memorable. After all, a lot of work has been put into getting to this point. I’ve added a satin ruffle. I’ve added lace with lavender ribbon weaved through and tied into bows in the corners – adorable. I’ve added prairie points. I would just love to have a book that would introduce me to new ideas. I haven’t made many quilts, but just wrapping the edges in a standard binding seems just okay to me. Kind of like framing a Picasso in a dollar store frame. A finished quilt is a masterpiece – frame it like one. 🙂

    —Stella stroble on June 25, 2013
  • I usually just double fold and machine stitch to the front and then handsew to the back. I need some other ideas! And directions. Your book sounds great.

    —Elaine Robertson on June 25, 2013
  • I usually do the traditional method of binding, but have started experimenting with other types. Some work, some don’t, since I am trying on my own with no real direction in what I’m doing. Would love to win the book, I love Mimi’s applique books so I know I could learn a lot from this one.

    —connie on June 25, 2013
  • Look at how beautiful these finishes are! I have always finished my quilts with bias binding. I tried once to extend the backing and fold it over to make a mitered edge, but I really was a beginner and didn’t know what I was doing. I would love to extend my skills to some of these shaped finishes – so pretty.

    —Jan on June 25, 2013
  • The first method illustrated is my usual. Someday I’ll be more adventurous.

    —Tesuque on June 25, 2013
  • I love hand stitching the binding down to finish a quilt, especially one that will be a gift. My happy ending is the new beginning the quilt will have with its new owner. I would love to try some different finishes that would help make a quilt extra special.

    —Susan C on June 25, 2013
  • I’m a fan of the sew-to-the-front by machine method, then hand-sew to the back. I use a double-fold binding, and I’ve always been really pleased with its plumpness and evenness.

    —Elizabeth Bolton on June 25, 2013
  • I’d love to try a different technique, like rounded corners when ending my quilts. The book sounds like a great tool.

    —Judy Allen on June 25, 2013
  • I love to sew my bindings by machine with the Martelli zip system.

    Lisa Garrett on June 25, 2013
  • I just like how you get to handstitch the binding on – its nice and slow and contemplative. Lots of time to admire your work!

    Taryn on June 25, 2013
  • What timing. I read this message today just after I got home from having lunch with a friend. We had been discussing the different ways to finish bindings. My favorite way to finish bindings on my own quilts is the usual way of sewing the binding on the front of the quilt and finishing on the back by hand using an almost invisible ladder stitch. There are times, however, when I like to finish them on the machine. I have been practicing this for years and have finally gotten to the point where I can stitch in the ditch on the front and just catch the edge of the binding in the back. I have volunteered to bind charity quilts for many years and that practice has enabled me to get much better at this. BTW – I still have the 1987 edition of Happy Endings as part of my set of The Joy of Quilting books.

    —Shirley A on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite happy ending is actually putting the binding on a quilt, because I know the quilt actually turned out! I didn’t have to stuff it in the back of a closet with other rejects or actually throw it away when no one was looking. I’ve used a flange, a bias binding, and straight binding. I’d love to get up the nerve to make mitered binding.. I’ve met Mimi Ditrich and love her and her books!

    —Melody on June 25, 2013
  • I usually just end up doing the basic folded corner, will definitely try the mitered on the next…I never realized there were sooo many ways. Guess I need the book one way or another.

    —Tracy DVR on June 25, 2013
  • I have been machine sewing them on, but I am not totally happy with the way they look.

    —Cindy Weeks on June 25, 2013
  • I have a copy of Mimi’s first book and I’ve used it a lot. This reprint looks great, I will be looking for it in my local quilt shop.

    —Shelly on June 25, 2013
  • Such fun, colorful bindings and loads of information. I have a Christmas tree skirt
    with scalloped edges that I need to bind. This book would be so helpful!
    Elaine, 6-25-13

    —Elaine Feldmann on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite way to bind is probably the most conventional way – machine stitch the front, turn, and hand stitch the back. It’s time consuming, but it gives me time to admire the finished quilt.

    —Pam on June 25, 2013
  • I am new to quilting, and have only tried what I was shown, and that was bringing the backing over to the front side, and hand sewing it down. This book would be wonderful to learn other ways of finishing off quilts.

    —Karen Snyder on June 25, 2013
  • I love the idea of using paper to make samples. Years ago when I was teaching middle school Home Economics I was under pressure during the first week of school to get up something on the wall by my principal. I wanted to make quilt blocks but knew it would take too long to make them out of fabric. So I bought some wrapping paper and make paper blocks. While it solved the problem, it was a blessing in disguise because at the end of the school year when I removed them, they had faded so much that I was thankful that I had not spent the time, fabric and energy to make them out of fabric! LOL!
    As a retired middle school teacher, I must have ADHD as I seldom make a quilt with repetitive blocks, it seems that I enjoy learning a new technique and then moving on. So it is true with bindings. I am trying to make a different binding with each new quilt I make as I am tired of doing it the same every time!

    —Rosemary on June 25, 2013
  • I use the traditional method of using a double fold strip sewn to the front of the quilt and then turned to the back and hand sewn . I really enjoy doing the binding in this way but would love to learn some new techniques.

    —Joan H on June 25, 2013
  • I sew my bindings on by hand (love to do handwork but having difficulty now with arthritis in that silly hand so…must try something new. I am intrigued by the methods that you show. This book is definitely on my wish list. Great giveaway. Thanks.

    —Rosemary on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve only done regular bindings until now, but after seeing this I’m going to be doing something new on my next quilt. Great ideas.

    —Cynthia Green on June 25, 2013
  • The only way I’ve ever bound a quilt is to use the traditional method. I have shied away from scalloped edges that are so pretty because I don’t know how to make bias binding. This book would be very helpful. Thanks for making it available.

    —Virginia in AK on June 25, 2013
  • Love Mimi’s books. Used her book when I taught binding in my quilt shop.

    John on June 25, 2013
  • Since I am a beginner, I have only bound three quilts so far. I have done it the way I was taught–by machine stitching the binding to the front and then folding it to the back and hand stiching it down.

    I would love to win this book and learn all the different ways and tricks to bind quilts.

    —Susan on June 25, 2013
  • I have only used the "traditional" method but would love to try some others.

    —Sandy N on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve only ever done a traditional type binding, machine sewn to the front and hand stitched to the back. The one time I tried folding the backing over to the front to use as binding, it didn’t turn out so well. I’ll have to try it as described in this post. Should come out a lot better!

    —Pat V. on June 25, 2013
  • I would love to win this book because I am not happy about the ways I’ve tried for sewing the binding on both front and back. I usually sew it on the front and do the back by hand because I have not found a better way.

    Thank you for the chance to win!

    Michelle

    —michelle on June 25, 2013
  • Thanks for all of your fun comments about Happy Endings! I wish you all could win a copy!

    —Mimi Dietrich on June 25, 2013
  • I really only know how to sew the binding on using a machine, and then sewing the front by hand. I would love to win this book, It would help me a lot with my quilting. I am a beginner with quilting. I have been sewing since I was a child though. Thank you for having this awesome giveaway!! I hope I win! 🙂

    —Kathy Gates on June 25, 2013
  • Didn’t realize there are many other ways to do bindings. I’ve only done the traditional sewn to the front and hand stitched in the back. Thanks for letting us know there are other ways. Would like to try the others.

    —Mary on June 25, 2013
  • I am always looking for new ideas for binding quilts, but always stick to the same old way.

    —Julie on June 25, 2013
  • This book should be in every quilter’s library! I’ve owned every edition so far, and intend to buy this one, too. Thanks, Mimi!

    —Laura Davis on June 25, 2013
  • A must-have reference for every quilter’s bookshelf.

    —Barbara on June 25, 2013
  • I would love to win this book. I need more binding creativity! Thanks so much for the opportunity to win!

    Duane Wiley on June 25, 2013
  • I use Mimi’s technique for most of my quilts but I like the way she uses the metered binding. If I were to win the book, I would probably pass it on to one of my daughters. They are just showing an interest in sewing since I bought them each a sewing machine last Christmas.

    —Rita Scott on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite ending? It isn’t done even after binding until I get the history block tacked on. You know, who, what, when, where of the quilt. (But I do mitered corners as above.)

    —Louise Chavis on June 25, 2013
  • For binding the corners, I used to stop 1/4″ away from the corner like Mimi shows, but I would frequently have problems with getting a good miter coverage when I turned the binding. I now stop 3/8″ away and my problems were solved. Thanks.

    —Joyce Mitchell on June 25, 2013
  • Last couple quilts I have made I have put a scalloped binding on them. Actually it was quite easy. I make a sleeve and cut a continuace bias to fit around the quilt. They turned out beautiful.

    —Darlene on June 25, 2013
  • Well I use the standard method of binding or at least it is to me I guess…lol…(the top section of the tips). However I like to have fun so with my quilts I usually put a second color into the binding in the lower right corner (8-12 inches or a bit more) going across the bottom and up the side. It is just a fun way to take one of the quilt fabrics and "pop" it a bit more and making my own statement in the process. It’s just for fun and they are my creations so why not!

    —Tonie on June 25, 2013
  • I’m generally use a traditional binding. Recently I was given insight while being a scribe at the local county fair for the quilting judge. She said to pay attention to those corner points and sew them close.

    kbo on June 25, 2013
  • I like bindings made from left-over fabric used in the quilted project. I cut these into 2 1/2 inch wide strips and seam the ends together in a diagonal seam, not a straight-across seam. This adds a more elegant touch to the whole binding. To finish the binding, I also make a diagonal seam. With lots of left-over fabric, I often make a bias binding because it holds up better.

    Marie Godfrey on June 25, 2013
  • I’m a binding genius–but then I was a Mimi student and have the first book. So glad it got it’s due and is coming back! Hope you still have the prairie points in there.

    Patricia, thanks for you comment–and yep, Mimi’s prairie points are still in there! ~Jenny

    —Patricia Hersl on June 25, 2013
  • I generally stitch my binding to the front by machine, and hand sew it to the back. I like bindings that include piping and other frills.

    Amy Eileen Koester on June 25, 2013
  • I took A binding class from Mimi about 10 years ago and have since basked in the compliments of how good my bindings look. This is the "go to" book on binding!

    —Shelly S. on June 25, 2013
  • I always love to learn new ways to do things. This book looks absolutely wonderful!

    —Teri Riordan on June 25, 2013
  • I make children’s quilts and would love the different ideas you have in the book.

    —Joyce O. on June 25, 2013
  • I really really enjoyed seeing this method using paper. I could learn exactly how to fold my fabric. I enjoy the mitered corners.

    Deb on June 25, 2013
  • well what can I say, after reading this……if I don’t win, think I’ll purchase and pass on the simplicity of this book to others…..thankyou

    —Shirl Hair on June 25, 2013
  • As a "Newbie" quilter, I’m ashamed to say that although I have completed the bulk of many, many quilts, I am so intimidated by the entire binding process that I have taken ONE of those quilts all the way to completion (which was, ironically, only completed as of last night!!) For this quilt, I made a simple, square-edged binding from a fabric which complemented the quilt fabrics. I have struggled immensely with the entire process and concept of quilt binding and finishing (despite having read every binding tutorial I can get my hands on!) I envy the completed quilts with perfect bindings, crisp lines and uniquely designed bindings. This eBook would be perfect for me!

    —Christa Dunn on June 25, 2013
  • Being self taught using books/videos, I am really a very basic binding person. Just seeing the two paper methods described is a big help. I would love to learn different methods of binding as binding seems to be the place where I need the most help. Binding can make or break a quilt and unfortunately I am not usually satisfied with how my bindings end up. I can see how the book would be a great help to me. Thank you.

    —Debby on June 25, 2013
  • I sooooo need this book. I have been quilting for many years and have come to hate binding – I am just that bad at it!!!!

    I have many flimsies unquilted as I am dreading the binding!

    —Jane on June 25, 2013
  • What a great story, 4 reprintings and it is the greatest book to have for reference I am sure. The pictures printed in the blog are crystal clear in pictoral presentation and written instructions. I would love to win the ebook and need to track down a class to take as she has my kind of welcoming smile and attitude…love the "technical assistance" of son’s kid tape recorder….he should get a mention in the new edition indeed!

    —MJ Modjeski on June 25, 2013
  • Your book would be ideal for me. I always do the same old thing, and I need new ideas.

    —Jean Hefflinger on June 25, 2013
  • I like it add a wee bit of a flange at the inside of the binding, gives it a bit of extra color, like the double matting on a framed picture.

    —Barbara Dahl on June 25, 2013
  • I am adventurous, i try to come up with different way to add bindings. Some of my methods are good and some lead to lots of laughter. No two bindings have ever been done quite the same. They usually are as unique as my quilts. Thank you for the chance to win, i find your book interesting and want to learn more. Happy quilting to all

    —Sharon Meyer on June 25, 2013
  • I do a traditional binding and would love to learn other ways to finish a quilt. This is a fantastic book and Mimi is a great teacher!!!! Thanks for the chance to win!!!

    —Janet E on June 25, 2013
  • I don’t know if I have finished enough quilts to have a favorite way…!
    Guess I need Mimi’s book to help me find one ;>

    —Barb Johnson on June 25, 2013
  • I do my binding the first way that you have shown. Love the mitered corner one that is shown too. Guess I need to try some different ways. Thanks for doing this. Love Mimi’s applique books.

    Sandy O on June 25, 2013
  • I usually bind with straight or bias binding by stitching to the front with mitered corners and hand stitching the back. Occasionally I add piping or a flange. Recently, I’ve been finishing art quilts with a facing. This book looks like it has so many options for finishing quilts that I’ve never seen. I would love to learn these techniques. A binding should add to a quilt and not just be an after thought. After all, a quilt is a work of art, so I want to finish it with that in mind. However, a quilt isn’t complete until a label with the history of the quilt is added! Thank you for sharing so many techniques, Mimi! I would be honored to win your book!

    —Lynnita on June 25, 2013
  • I’m still learning how to quilt. Binding is something I’m still learning, Sounds like I need this book.

    —Dorie on June 25, 2013
  • I am very fortunate to be able to take classes from Mimi, who was obviously born with a knack for teaching quilters.

    —Nancy Bautro on June 25, 2013
  • Lots of different ways – continuous bias binding, straight binding, bring the back fabric to the front for binding – all very traditional now that I think about it! I need to experiment with some new "Happy Endings".

    —lindawwww on June 25, 2013
  • Plain, old, simple fold over and miter the corners. I’d love to try some new techniques. I’m just a beginner.

    —Jusa on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite way to finish a quilt is with a two color binding – one in which the top matches the quilt top and the back matches the quilt backing. It is a little more time consuming and does take a bit more fabric but the results are outstanding.

    —Shirley Bixby on June 25, 2013
  • I usually do a traditional binding – But for small quilts I would sometimes use the pillow type – RST stitch the edges leaving a space to turn the quilt right side out.
    Quick and easy. I love the chance to win this book – Thank you.

    —jane on June 25, 2013
  • I would love a copy of this book.

    —Nancy on June 25, 2013
  • Wow, I had no idea there were other ways to do a binding. I would love towin tht book. Thanks for the chance.

    —sandy on June 25, 2013
  • I do the basic double fold but would enjoy learning how to spice things up.

    —Deb Mac on June 25, 2013
  • I use Mimi’s technique for my mitered bindings but I’d like to try some other options. Winning Happy Endings would give teach me how to use those options!

    —Terri E on June 25, 2013
  • I like to use a double fold machine stitched to the front and hand sewn to the back using mitered corners. I generally cut straight of grain unless the quilt has a curved edge or I’m working with a stripe or plaid and am looking for a different look.

    —Jackie on June 25, 2013
  • I do smaller quilts with scraps from current quilts and try different binding applications to complement the design and colors. Width and hands finishes get my attention the most. I love the first folded corner binding I tried. It was like a magic corner finish for me. Amazing book!

    —Janey Cook on June 25, 2013
  • Looks like lots of fun ways to finish a quilt!

    —Jeannine on June 25, 2013
  • What a great book! I do the traditional bindings with mitred corners. I’ve been wondering about other kinds of bindings because sometimes my projects would look nicer, I think, with a different kind of binding. This book has some neat "happy endings".

    —Wanda Heath on June 25, 2013
  • Sounds like a great book for beautiful bindings.

    —Susan Stanton on June 25, 2013
  • I NEED THIS BOOK! OMG! MY FAVORITE FINISHING TECHNIQUE..
    is to ask my quilting friend to do it. I have not conquered the art of bindings.

    —Debi Bielawski on June 25, 2013
  • Ever since I had carpel tunnel surgery on both wrists, it has been difficult to hand sew. I apply my French binding to the back of the quilt and then top-stitch it to the front. It is easy to add a piping or a flange when binding in this way.

    —Barbara Belanger on June 25, 2013
  • I love to insert a flat faux piping in the binding, so there is a 1/8 of an inch reveal of a contrasting or coordinating colour all around. A classy finish.

    —Cathy Clark on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve been sewing for many years but quilting is new to me. It’s really exciting to see all the different ideas for so many
    Different projects and the book on "happy endings" would make it even more so!!!

    —Carolyn McBride on June 25, 2013
  • I’m still learning and would put this book to great use. So far I’ve used wide double fold bias tape, machine stitched to the quilt top, folded over and hand stitched on the back with mitered corners…not perfectly but for my first try not too bad. Thanks for offering this giveaway!

    —Rhonda on June 25, 2013
  • Oh you just don’t know how bad I would love to win Happy Endings. I am super stuck on binding a quit that is octoganol shaped but with many of the blocks left out so I do not know how to bind in and out and around this interesting one different shaped block quilt. I need major help.

    —Robin Batchelor on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite way to bind quilts is using the method presented in any of Eleanor Burns books. I find it the easiest and most professionally done binding. I would enjoy trying the bindings found in this book.

    —Jackie Wisherd on June 25, 2013
  • I am a new quilter and have only made a few small items so far. I have used the traditional method of machine stitching to the front and hand stitching the back. I would love to learn other methods. Thank you!

    —Angelia L. on June 25, 2013
  • I am one of the few, I believe, who likes binding quilts. I find it so exciting, knowing that my quilt is almost finished, and I really enjoy the hand work. Currently, I like using pieced binding on my quilts. It really does make for a "happy ending" as the multiple colors and prints of my quilt finish things off. I’d love to win the book "Happy Endings" and learn some new tricks. Thank you for the chance to win this book.

    —Kathy Biciocchi on June 25, 2013
  • I sew the binding onto the front, then turn it over the edge and hand stitch the binding to the back. I use straight binding as mitered corners seem like they would be hard to do. I think I need this book. Thanks for the lovely giveaway.

    Christine M on June 25, 2013
  • My favorite ending is the only way I know how. The double fold bias thing. I am teaching myself how to quilt and would love to learn other ways to finish my quilts. Thank you for the opportunity to win this book. It looks awesome!

    —Debbie Schoeppler on June 25, 2013
  • I love your idea for wrapping backing around to the front as a "mock" binding complete with mitered corner. I think that trick will speed up my production of quilts for charity. I would love to see the other ideas you have for bindings, so am hoping to win a copy of your book! Thanks!

    —Nancy in Minnesota on June 25, 2013
  • I’ve done the basic binding and hand-stitched to the back. However, I did try to bind a Christmas tree potholder and could’ve used some tips on binding on an inside corner. I got better as I did four of them. I’d love to win the book and expand my options of "Happy Ending".

    —Janet Sabol on June 25, 2013
  • I usually do mitered corners, but the quilt I’m trying to finish now will have a VERY small imitation binding, because my quilt backing turned out to be too short, and it seemed to be the only way to fix it. Thank you for showing the layout instructions for mitered corners….so much easier than the way I had been doing them!

    —Marie P on June 25, 2013
  • Thank you so much for tips!
    I’m so glad I have my walking foot–it is a lifesaver with so many projects!
    I like 2 1/2″ double fold homemade binding with mitered corners and hand-finished.
    However, many of my friends and neighbors know I live to quilt, and have asked me how to do a self-binding with the backing fabric wrapped to the front. I didn’t know how–so these tips are great and this book would be priceless to help me share with others.

    Rachell R on June 25, 2013
  • I am a fairly new quilter so haven’t done very many bindings. I could use all the helpful
    hints I can get. Thank you for the chance to win this great book. Good luck everybody!!

    —Wendy M on June 25, 2013
  • I have always wanted to try other ways to finish my quilt tops. Right now I have 11 tops to finish, maybe this will motivate me to finish them and learn new techniques at the same time.

    —Dorothy Van Pelt on June 25, 2013
  • As a new-ish quilter I’ve only bound quilts the traditional way… This is so inspirational!!

    —Christine Slaughter on June 25, 2013
  • I usually just use a bias strip, doubled, to make my bindings. It always looks neat- but it’s a little boring…. I’d love to read the "Happy Endings" book so I could be a little more creative with my quilt bindings!

    —Roberta Kennedy on June 25, 2013
  • I am a "newbie" to quilting. I have only done 2 simple bindings. My favorite so far is a simple bring the material from the back and miter the corners. This book would be awesome to win! Thank you for the opportunity and all of your time put into writing.

    Lorene S on June 25, 2013
  • I normally stop anywhere from 1/4″ to 3/8″ from each of the corners like Eleanor Burns or Mimi shows, for mitering corners and use the latest new binding tool to miter the two ends together for an all around finish.

    What I consider to be, MY Happy Endings is in my label. After typing all the pertinent information on a white sheet of paper, I print it on a clean white (no white on white) fabric at a local print shop. I, then, fold the edges down, all around the label and machine stitch on the very edge of the label. I cut off the excess fabric leaving a half inch for turning under. The sewn edge gives me a straight secured edge for hand stitching it down on my quilt. Sometimes, I pre-make the label and using the same steps, I machine sew to the backing of my quilt before it is quilted, which gives a more secured way of the label never being removed without damage to the entire quilt. Sometimes, I add, a decorative border around the label depending on who’s getting the quilt.

    Keep smiling,

    Lynnita Shipman on June 25, 2013
  • I do a traditional binding like the one in the first illustration: machine sew it to the front, and hand stitch it to the back.

    Anita on June 25, 2013
  • I have only used the traditional method so it looks as if I have lots to learn!

    —Diane on June 26, 2013
  • The paper samples are a great idea! I mostly use a traditional mitered binding, hand sewn onto the back of the quilt. Binding is one of my favorite parts of making a quilt! The faux piped binding has been popular lately, and I like the one that changes color at the corners. I’d love to add this book to my library.

    —Sharon on June 26, 2013
  • This is a must have reference book.I´m planning to buy it for a while.
    I hope to be the lucky one to win the book.
    Lucia

    —Lucia Araujo on June 26, 2013
  • My favorite way is whatever gets it DONE! Mostly I machine zigzag my bindings on, double folded but one single pass with the zigzag stitch all the way around. My quilts are being used on beds, couches, by kids & dogs — they need to hold up, and if stitches show, no problem.

    I will definitely check out Mimi’s book, though! It was another of her books that got me started on quilting in the first place; would love to learn some better looking finishing techniques!

    The Reader on June 26, 2013
  • I prefer using 2 1/2″ binding and sewing it on 3/8″ then finishing by hand on the back. I pretty much just use the basic technique she shows first. I’ve never done a scallop edge. It would be fun to try out some different techniques and get her hints and helps.

    —Laraine on June 26, 2013
  • My favorite way is the simplest : A bias strip on the top and bottom and then to apply the sides. I’m a beginning quilter so that’s the only way I know right now. Would love to win this book!

    trillium on June 26, 2013
  • My very first quilt I was so scared to do the binding, I did prairie points instead! Although I have done regular bindings, and bindings with piping, I’m looking for ideas for the Grandmother’s Flower Garden I’m currently working on.

    —Jenny on June 26, 2013
  • I love doing metered corners on my binding

    —jane on June 26, 2013
  • Mimi Dietrich is such a great person and teacher—her book would be a welcome addition to my library. And I love doing bindings!

    —Deborah on June 26, 2013
  • The only method I have ever tried is cutting my strips at 2 1/2 inches. Join the strips, then press in half wrong sides together. I sew the raw edge of the binding to the edge of the front of my quilt. Miter the corners. I then fold the binding to the back of my quilt and hand stitch. I would LOVE to win this book and learn new techniques!

    —Sue on June 26, 2013
  • Binding is my weakest skill, I believe. I love the ideas already shown in the book and would love to have a copy.

    —Sharon Judkins on June 26, 2013
  • I always do a traditional double 2″ folded binding. I really should expand my binding horizons and try something new.

    —Janice M on June 26, 2013
  • I do the traditional method of binding but would love to learn new techniques. This book looks great! Thanks for the chance to win it.

    —Connie on June 26, 2013
  • Unfortunately, I have no Happy Endings. I always struggle to make my binding look professional and finished. Maybe the front will end up looking good, but the back looks tacky. I need Help and if your book can give me Happy Endings, I will do the Happy Dance when I get a copy. I am so excited to think that I too can have a Happy Ending and enjoy the finished quilt, I am eagerly awaiting the book.

    —Janice on June 26, 2013
  • Happy endings? well, many of my quilts are UFOs and waiting for their own special happy ending. I bet this book would help!

    —Linda Vanderbaan on June 26, 2013
  • This is one book I really want in my Quilting Library! I’ve been looking for a copy for a while now. Mimi Dietrich is known for her simple teaching technique & all of us have fought with bindings along the way. To have her book for reference would really simplify my life! Hope I win!

    —Sandy B on June 26, 2013
  • I use the traditional French binding. Fold in half, sew to the front with mitered corners and hand stitched to the back. I would love to try some new and fun binding for future quilts.

    —Marsha Nelson on June 26, 2013
  • I am pretty much of a traditionalist when it comes to binding, and it’s one of my favorite parts of the quilting process. I attach it to the quilt by machine, but then I hand stitch it to the backing. As I give away most of the quilts that I make, this gives me one last chance to "bond".

    —Diane Hanke on June 26, 2013
  • Wow this book is one of a kind! I am definitely gonna buy it if I don’t win it. This newbie to quilting could use a few "happy endings". Mine don’t always turn out the way I want them to look. I love her mitered corners.

    —Susan Paxton on June 26, 2013
  • When I am giving a quilt, whether as a gift or someone asks and I say "Yes!", my bindings and labels include a personal reflection of the quilt and the person receiving it. I love binding, it means the quilt is almost finished and I get to put my personal touch on something that I know will end up "Happy" somewhere. I am a sew it on the back and bring it to the front binding gal, and my work has a few in awe of how beautiful bindings can turn out, with such a basic, simple easy, method.
    My labels are personalized with colorings or a binded fabric border from the quilt, and I always make a pillowcase as the gift wrap which goes on the bed with the quilt or for storing the quilt when moving or gifting, etc. There are always Happy Endings, because I put personal touches in everything, and I never charge for anything, which makes me and the receiver that much Happier! I have heard about this book, never seen it, but OMG! what a great addition to every quilter’s library! How exciting to learn new techniques to pass on to the next generation.

    —Cindy on June 26, 2013
  • I’ve used the traditional way of binding for many years, sew it to the front and hand sew to the back. I have used the bias binding method for curvy bindings, it wasn’t my favorite method but it works perfectly for curves. This year I ventured out and stitched my bindings to the back and turned them over to the front and used a decorative stitch for stitching them down to the front. It sure makes the process go quickly. I would love to have a copy of Mimi’s book in my library, it would be a welcome addition and definitely used. Thanks for the chance.

    —Kim D. on June 26, 2013
  • The only way I have ever done binding is the double fold way, turned to the back of the quilt and hand stitched. So anxious to read this book!
    Thank you for the chance to win it!!

    —Lu Ann on June 26, 2013
  • I want it, I want it! I find myself completely intimidated when it comes to binding. This book looks like it’s super easy to follow and has lots of wonderfully creative ideas.

    —Michelle on June 26, 2013
  • What a wonderful way to miter a backing corner! That is how I will do it from now on!

    PS: Please don’t put all previous blog entries together with the latest one. Slows down opening the blog!

    Hi Lynne, the front page of our blog has a running list of our posts by date. But if you ever want to view a single blog post, simply click on the title at the top of that post. That should save on download time. Thanks for your comment! ~Jenny

    —Lynne on June 26, 2013
  • I usually make traditional bindings but when pressed for time, I machine-sew the binding on the front of the quilt using some of the decorative stitches on my machine. By using a wide stitch and positioning the needle in the "ditch", I almost always catch the binding on the back. Using rayon thread gives a nice look to the machine stitching.

    —Gail D. on June 26, 2013
  • I hate, hate binding. Perhaps this book will help. It looks very nice from what I’ve seen

    —michele on June 26, 2013
  • I usually use the double fold, straight grain binding, but I have also joined scraps of fabric (bias seam) to make a double fold binding. I would love to read this book, especially for bindings for inside corners. Thanks for giving us the chance to win a copy.

    —Karen on June 26, 2013
  • Love your mitered corner binding. I have never done one of those. I usually bind by machine stitching on the back side of the quilt and wrapping to the front and top stitching with the machine. It is pretty boring. I suspect your book would give me some more options. I would be thrilled to own it. Thanks for the opportunity to try.

    —Sharon on June 26, 2013
  • Wow! I never thought of so many ways to finish a quilt. I’ve always just bound it. I’d love to win and learn some new ways!

    —Diana Diana on June 26, 2013
  • I use the tried and true method of binding using double fold fabric sewn to the right side, folded back to the backing (to hand sew in place) having mitered the corners and sewn the ends together on the diagonal. However I really liked Mimi’s paper samples to ‘keep in your book’ to refer to later. I’ve never tried bringing the backing over to the front of the quilt, but with her clear ‘paper’ directions, I’ll try that sometime soon.
    Thanks Mimi!! And congrats on republishing your first book after 25 years!

    —Marie Eddins on June 26, 2013
  • I have never made a quilt, not yet at least. These are so pretty, I love the bright colors!

    —Sunnie on June 26, 2013
  • I love mitered corners, and have been working on perfecting my miters. I’ve only done double-folded borders, and either machine or hand-stitched them to the back. I’m thrilled at the chance to see the amazing variety in Mimi’s book!
    I’m really excited at the opportunity to win it!

    —Carol on June 26, 2013
  • This book is a wealth of knowledge that I need! I’ve only done the double foled binding, sewn on the front, turned to the back and hand sewn down. I’d so love to learn some different ways to do a binding. Great idea to practice with the paper to remember how the fabric folds.

    Thank you for a super giveaway and a chance to win.

    usairdoll(at)gmail(dot)com

    —usairdoll on June 26, 2013
  • I have finished very few quilts, but am not very happy with my endings. I do pretty good FMQing, it’s a shame to have a lousy finish. Last time I used glue to help me along – the corners look better but next time I’m going to follow your directions. Thank you for putting my name in the hat for this drawing.

    June @ QuiltQuest on June 26, 2013
  • I think I am one of the few people who enjoy hand stitching the binding to the back of the quilt or whichever project. I find it is quite portable and you can get quite a bit done in a short period of time. I would love to learn some new and interesting techniques; this book looks like it has a lot to offer.
    Thanks for the giveaway!

    —Michelle on June 26, 2013
  • I really like using unusual novelty or geometric prints for the binding. I do sew the entire binding on by machine, I don’t do any handwork at all.

    Thanks so much for showing how to bring the backing to the front as a binding, I am going to try that! I’ve been afraid to try that because I really didn’t understand how to do it.

    —JoAnne T. on June 27, 2013
  • As well as using the more traditional type of binding 2 1/2″ folded in half, sewn on the front then turned to the back and hand stitched down, my finishing touch mostly has a label made from a linen doily that I purchase from a buy again store. I think that is what you call them, we call them "Opportunity Shops" or Op Shops, usually run by charities, here in Australia. I would love to have a go at the different methods shown in the book

    —Lee-Allan Urbanski on June 27, 2013
  • I love the colorful cover of the book and would love to have a good guide to scalloped edges. I would love to see this book.

    Kris S on June 27, 2013
  • I usually just add a regular double-fold binding to the edge – mitering the corners. I’m really fascinated by the pictures you showed from the book with more creative ways to finish quilts. Thank you for the chance to win this informative and fun-looking book.

    —LJ on June 27, 2013
  • Oh my, I need your book so bad. I have tried mitered corner binding and I get may 2 right and 2 corners well not so right. After reading what’s in the book, I’m amazed. It’s like ABC with out extra stuff thrown in. Thanks for the Giveaway and thanks for bringing your book to our attention.
    ncjeepster@aol.com

    —Karen Propes on June 27, 2013
  • I sure would like to try some other method of binding. I use the traditional method but just reading the article tells me there are many more ways to put on binding. It looks like I need that book.

    Peggy on June 27, 2013
  • This book is just what I need to continue adding to my quilting skills. I would definitely try more than one method. I need this book!

    —Arlene on June 27, 2013
  • What a great idea for a book. I would love to get the book so I could try them.

    —Cheryl Loyd on June 27, 2013
  • I have finished only one quilt and asked someone else to do the binding. When I got the quilt back there were a few holes where stitches were missed, and I wasn’t happy with it. I’m going to be finishing a table runner in a few weeks, and I’m determined to sew the binding on myself. This book would help me immensely! I’m not much of a hand-sewer and only a beginning quilt maker. Thank you for the opportunity to win a copy of this much needed book!

    —Linda on June 27, 2013
  • Well, I would have to say that my binding techniques are rather blah… same old lol. I have tried to add piping on the last quilt I just finished, and it looked good, but there is always room for improvement and inspiration!! Mimi’s book should help with both – thank you for sharing, and for the chance to win an e-copy of her book!!

    —Carol J on June 27, 2013
  • What a difference all of the little details can make for a quilt! The binding is kind of like the landing a gymnast makes after a routine. All of the time and skill and creativity that goes into a quilt can really be topped off by a great landing or binding!!
    I would love to win this book – thank you for the chance!

    —Jillb on June 27, 2013
  • I love having options, because each project may have different "best" bindings and such.
    Nice ideas!

    —Bunnie Cleland on June 27, 2013
  • I am totally on board–you make so many blocks and they look great and then you struggle with the bindings! I get so frustrated that my bindings just don’t look as professional as my blocks. I am going to make the paper templates to remind myself, but would sooo.. like to win the book so I can perfect my bindings and get "happy Endings"

    —Sharon at the Shore on June 28, 2013
  • This looks like a great technique book. I’m pretty new to this and have only tried 2 diff types of binding… would love to try more.

    —SueZQ on June 28, 2013
  • Oh my stars and garters…I am DROOLING!!!! This is an amazing publication, and opens the creative doors on binding…WooHoo…LOVE IT! The binding to me has always been the "frame for the artwork" and wowser, these frames are the best!

    —Lorry Kirschner on June 28, 2013
  • I normally do just the old fashioned way, sew the binding on the front, turn to back and hand stitch. Lately, I have put 2 bindings on with the piping technique. And I liked that too.

    Sandy (aka Stitches) on June 28, 2013
  • I like to put piping in my bindings. It provides ant quilt a bit of pizazz! I have a copy of the original book. Am looking forward to purchasing a ‘new edition’.

    —Norma on June 28, 2013
  • I’ve always bound with folded binding stopping 1/4″ from the end as you described but lately I’ve been doing table toppers with points and scallops and binding gives me fits. Can’t wait to discover the proper way to do this.

    —Mary Verrico on June 28, 2013
  • I have been using Happy Endings for 25 years and love and use all the bindings. Look forward to purchasing the new one for my 10 year old grandson who is learning to quilt. He loves the binding part the best of all the quilting techniques and is great at learning new things. My book is so threadbare that I need a new one to hand down to him. Thanks for the many books and years of being a leader in the quilting world.

    —Dianne Deaver on June 28, 2013
  • It’s good to have more ideas for bindings. Thanks for the giveaway.

    —Audrey on June 28, 2013
  • I need this book. I usually just put right sides together, sew, turn inside out–just to avoid bindings. Oh my, I am lazy.

    —CindyM on June 28, 2013
  • These are gret ideas that I will teach to my students when I receive the book.

    —Linda on June 28, 2013
  • I would love to win the book, it would be very helpful indeed!!!
    (smjohns63 at yahoo dot com)

    —Shawn J on June 28, 2013
  • This book looks like one that would be useful for my intermediate quilting class. I teach them the tried and true method of bias folded binding with mitered corners, hand stitched on the back. In the class, I try to have a variety of books to show them for future reference and expansion of methods that I teach. This book looks like one that I would love to add to my library so that I can expand my own knowledge level. Thanks for the chance to win it.

    —Doris W on June 28, 2013
  • Haven’t quilted all that long, but all my finished ones (!) have the standard double-fold, hand-stitched binding. It takes forever to finish but I like the old-fashioned nature of it. But if I win, promise I’ll try something new!

    —James on June 28, 2013
  • I knew there had to be a way to bind using the backing. Thanks for the info but I really need this book.

    —Charlotte on June 28, 2013
  • I use the traditional double fold binding sewn on the front by machine and hand sewn on the back. I like to do the binding, but have had problems with pain in my forefinger and my nail turning blue. I need to find a really nice 100% machine applied binding!

    —Karen Stein on June 28, 2013
  • I also only use the traditional double fold binding. From the looks of Happy Endings, there are more techniques I should try.

    —Laura on June 28, 2013
  • I am mentally preparing myself to bind my first quilt. I’ve watched all my binding videos several times and I’m still skiddish about doing it. I have to say that "Happy Endings" seems to offer another whole take on doing the binding.

    Thank you for sponsoring this giveaway.

    —Cheryl Greenleaf on June 28, 2013
  • Wow, I just love the mitred corner look and have never been taught how to do that binding until now. I have been making some small mug rugs lately and been having trouble with some of the bindings due to the thickness of fabric ending up in the binding (as I have been using interfacings sometimes two layers with batting as well). I’m going to give Mimi’s mitred corner a go because her instructions make it so simple! It a no brainer as far as I am concerned. If I don’t win the book I don’t really mind as I’ve added it to my wishlist for next fortnight pay to buy the eversion! Thank you Mimi it’s a truly wonderful book. I am looking forward to learning how to make a scallop edge for my next quilting project. Julie Beard.

    —Julie Beard on June 28, 2013
  • Great to see your great little article , wood love to be lucky enough to win your book. Iris Bradbury

    —Iris Bradbury on June 29, 2013
  • Wow, I never knew all the different ways to bind. I would love to add a few of these to my repertoire, since it currently consists of one!

    —Brenda Thompson on June 29, 2013
  • I am eager to try all the different finishing techniques offered in Mimi’s book. I’m ready to take my quilts to another level! Pick me, pick me… 🙂

    —Evelyn Nodal on June 29, 2013
  • Always fun to try new or different ways of doing things. It’s nice to have different options at the ready. To win this book would be just perfect to give these ideas a try. Thanks for all the wonderful books and giveaways you have.

    —Cindy on June 29, 2013
  • I usually just do a mitered corner. Because I like to learn new things, I do have a quilt sandwich that I want to put a scalloped edge on. There is also one, in the line of many unfished quilts, that I plan on a praire point. Loved the little demo for mitered border. Different technique. Thanks

    —Marguerite Namdar on June 29, 2013
  • I would have to have more than one good choice to be able to name a favorite. I tend to stick with the traditional, even when other options would probably be a better choice. Information on other methods would be a welcome addition!

    —Pearl on June 29, 2013
  • I’m fairly new to quilting and have only used double-fold bindings (both straight of grain and bias bindings) so far. My next project will be binding a large template apple core quilt, with lots of curves & miters… I plan to try a flange binding soon and some prairie points, too. The Happy Ending books looks like it would be a very helpful resource for me.

    —Kathleen Dalecio on June 30, 2013
  • I’m still a beginner and struggle with the "happy endings"

    —Carmen on June 30, 2013
  • Wow! I love to put on binding and usually do the traditional. I have been missing some great other ways to add binding. I will have to add this book to my collection of "can’t live withouts!"

    Linny on July 1, 2013

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