Chain cast on tutorial + bind off

Cast On, Bind OffWe know that the beauty of knitting is in the details—and that many of you love to get creative with the details in your projects. That’s why we’re so excited about what’s become one of our most popular titles: Cast On, Bind Off by Cap Sease. This robust reference guide includes over 200 ways to cast on and bind off in knitting, from traditional to decorative to functional. Even if your arsenal of knitting stitches is vast, this step-by-step guide will introduce you to all-new stitches for adding the perfect finishing (and beginning!) touches to scarves, socks, and more.

You’ll find cast-on knitting methods like loop cast ons, long-tail cast ons, decorative and tubular cast ons, and more—plus techniques for binding off in knitting like chain bind offs, sewn bind offs, and special bind offs. Take a peek at the table of contents below for more of the techniques included in the book—and read on for an excerpt with instructions for one cast on and one bind off!

Cast On Bind Off Table of Contents


Chain Cast On
Also called Chain-Edge Cast On, Chained Cast On, Bind-Off Cast On, Japanese Cast On, Cast-Off Cast On

This cast on creates an elastic edge with chained loops along the front. It resembles the standard bind-off edge and can be used with it when you want the cast-on and bound-off edges to look the same. You will need a crochet hook as well as a needle. The size of the hook is not too important, as the needle will determine the size of the stitches.

Chain Cast On tutorial

1. Make a loose slipknot about 5″ from the end of the yarn and place it on the crochet hook. Hold the hook in your right hand and the needle in your left hand. Loop the working strand over the left index finger. *With the crochet hook above the needle and the working yarn below it, swing the hook from the left behind the strand on the index finger, catch the yarn, and pull the loop over the needle and through the slipknot.

Make a loose slip knot

2. Bring the working yarn to the back under the needle.

Bring the working yarn to the back

3. Repeat from * until there is one less stitch than required. Slip the remaining loop from the hook to the needle.

Slip the remaining loop


Yarn-Over Bind Off
Also called Modified Standard Bind Off

This bind off creates a decorative, open edge that is quite stretchy. The edge flares slightly, making it a good option for lace, ruffles, or sock cuffs. Once you learn this bind off, you can make the edge fit any scalloped or wavy pattern by varying the number and frequency of the yarn overs. Place more where the edge curves and fewer where the edge is straighter. Make a swatch to determine the best number and placement for a given pattern.

Yarn-Over Bind Off

1. K1, bring the yarn to the front to make a yarn over, K1.

Make a yarn over

2. With the left needle, lift the yarn over (middle stitch) over the left stitch and off the needle, then lift the right stitch over the left stitch and off the needle.

Lift the yarn over

3. Bring the yarn to the front to make a yarn over, K1. Repeat steps 2 and 3.


Yarn-Over Bind Off Variation
Also called Modified Standard Bind Off

1. K2, with the left needle lift the right stitch on the right needle over the left stitch and off the needle.

2. Bring the yarn to the front to make a yarn over and K1.

Make a yarn over

3. Insert the left needle into both the yarn over and the right stitch on the right needle and lift them together over the left stitch and off the needle.

Lift the yarn over and right stitch


If you’re itching to try all 211 cast ons and bind offs, you can purchase Cast On, Bind Off right now at ShopMartingale.com—and remember, when you purchase the book, you get the eBook version for free right away. No need to wait to start stitching.

How many different types of cast ons and bind offs do you know? Do you want to learn more? Tell us in the comments!


9 Comments (leave a comment)

  • Do I want to learn more cast on, bind off techniques—-definitely. I have knit for many, many years but it has been my attempts at toe up socks that has told me I need to add more casting and binding techniques to my repetoire. Both the cast on and bind off were major challenges. I was so disappointed when the cast off was far from stretchy. I think the yarn over bind off would have helped immensely. Thanks for the giveaway opportunity.

    —Audrey on March 8, 2013
  • I’m so new to knitting that I thought there was only one bind off method. Guess you can tell I’d really like to see some more bind-on, bind-off techniques. Actually, techniques of any kind would help me.

    —LeAnne L on March 8, 2013
  • I’ve been knitting for 40 years or more and I kind of have the mind-set that the cast on and bind off methods that my mother taught me are the "only" way to do it. But, like Audrey, I was not pleased with my non-stretchy bind off on my toe up socks. I tried using bigger needles on the last inch or so, but they still were not comfortable. Then I found an article on different bind offs and it made a world of difference. Now to think there’s a WHOLE BOOK full of them. Wow.

    —Martha on March 8, 2013
  • I was taught one way to cast on when I first learned to knit. I didn’t know there were so many ways to start. I switched to crochet when i wanted to do sweaters, hats etc. I have always preferred the look of knit but didn’t know how to do more complicated projects. Mine always looked wrong. Especially around the edges. It would be so much fun to make a sample square for each cast on and bind off technique. I will start with chain cast on and yarn over cast off. Thanks for the tutorial!

    —Diane on March 8, 2013
  • Within this week I read about "german" style cast on, I never realized there were any other styles beyond the long-yarn cast-on and the two needle cast-on. Wow, in one week, to read about another style of cast-on and then to see more bind-off techniques as well being described in a whole book!! I am so intrigued, I am almost ready to run, get some yarn, needles and made a swatch of each. Instead, you are offering a free book to have!! More things to learn-bring them on.

    —kathy pfaltzgraff on March 8, 2013
  • i know quite a few defferent methods of cast on and cast off … but i tend to forget, so i’ve got a file full of cast ons and cast offs for refernce when i need something more than my fav that i usually use.

    ritainalaska on March 8, 2013
  • I learnt to cast on by watching my grandmother who used her finger.When I was very young my mother says she couldn’t figger out what I was doing- I was imitating my grand mother-without the yarn.

    —ELIZABETH CROSS on March 8, 2013
  • I was taught by my mom on a pair of needles my nanny sent me from England ..Which I still have.My grand daughter [10 years old] is now learning to Knit with the same needles.I am very pleased to learn .new ways to do old things.I do a lot of crafting and have been Quilting since 2005.I believe it keeps our minds sharp and our fingers nimble.My mom is still knitting and crocheting at 89 years .doing her own housework as well’ She’s wonderful.

    —Elsie on March 19, 2013
  • I was taught by my mom on a pair of needles my nanny sent me from England .My grand daughter [10 years old] is now learning to Knit with the same needles.I am very pleased to learn,new ways to do old things.I do a lot of crafting and have been Quilting since 2005.I believe it keeps our minds sharp and our fingers nimble.My mom is still knitting and crocheting at 89 years. Still doing her own housework as well.She’s wonderful.

    —Elsie on March 19, 2013

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