How to make a scrap quilt – with precuts! (+ giveaway)

Fabric fanatics rejoice: Kim Brackett is back with a new collection of spectacular quilts that’ll perfectly pair up with your precut piles OR your scrap-basket beauties. In Scrap-Basket Strips and Squares, you get the best of both worlds!
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Detail-of-quilts-from-Scrap-Basket-Strips-and-Squares
Details of quilts from
Scrap-Basket Strips and Squares

Scrap-Basket Strips and SquaresThe four-time best-selling author of the Scrap-Basket series of books reveals how to make a scrap quilt with Jelly Rolls, charm squares, and Layer Cakes—or your scrap stash. Got traditional prints? Florals? Batiks? Solids? Whatever your fabric fancy, Kim’s new quilt patterns celebrate them all.

We invited our Facebook and Instagram followers to ask Kim about her quilts, her design methods, and her creative inspirations. So how does she get that cheery, scrappy look at the heart of her signature style? Read on to get a peek into Kim’s creative process!
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From @cindynixdorff via Instagram: Where do you find your inspiration for all your quilts?

Kim BrackettHi, Cindy! Sometimes I’m inspired by color combinations, but I typically don’t just imagine quilt designs. Most of the time, I draw designs in Electric Quilt 7 using only two colors to separate the background from the main fabrics. Once I have a design that I like, I color in the pieces with digital fabric swatches. This gives me a preview of what my finished quilt will look like.
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Touch-a-Star-quilt
Touch a Star

From @punkydoodle53 via Instagram: So excited to see a new book by Kim! What inspires you and how do come up with a name for your quilts?

I’m so glad you’re excited, PunkyDoodle! Naming quilts is never easy for me. In fact, there’s an explanation in Scrap-Basket Strips and Squares about why I named a quilt “Woodruff.” Some names are inspired by fabric collections; others are inspired by what I think the blocks look like or something that I’m reminded of the most while making the quilt.
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Woodruff-quilt
Woodruff

From Nancy via Facebook: What is your most favorite aspect of quilting? If you were to design a quilt just for you, what would you envision it to be?

Nancy, I love all aspects of quilting! A lot of quilters complain about cutting, but that part of the process is very relaxing and satisfying to me. Other than the quilts from my books, the only quilt I still own that was made by me is the first quilt I made. So I’ve been thinking it’s time to make a just-for-me quilt! And it’s going to be my first bed-size quilt. It will have lots of small pieces and will be wildly scrappy. Although I usually never make the same quilt twice, it may be a larger version of the Wildflowers quilt from this book.
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Wildflowers-quilt
Wildflowers

From Karen via Facebook: What spurred you to write your first book? And what advice do you have for aspiring designers?

Karen, my first book was the result of having accumulated way too many scraps! You can read more about how it happened here.  My advice to aspiring designers (especially those who have a collection of designs they would like to publish in a book) would be to submit a proposal. You’ll find a few tips at the link, and you can download the proposal form.
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Magnolia-Bay-Gazette-quilt
Magnolia Bay Gazette

From Sidney via Facebook: What was your first quilt like and what mistakes did you make? What did it teach you?

Sidney, instead of saying that I started quilting in 1988, I should say I started practicing quilting in 1988. I learned to cut pieces for blocks using Mylar templates and scissors, learned to sew a straight quarter-inch seam (by hand and machine), and I pretty much just played for almost 10 years. I sewed blocks but never joined them into a quilt.

When I moved to Florida and started working at a law firm where I met a fellow quilter, we each began working on a pieced and appliquéd quilt. By the time I started working on a real quilt, I had already developed a lot of skills—everything but color skills! Fortunately, the quilt was incredibly scrappy, so all the weird fabrics and colors looked more like an old-fashioned scrap quilt. Since then, I’ve learned a lot more about choosing fabrics that play nicely together.
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Windmills-quilt
Windmills

Precut or stash fabrics? Your choice! See more from the book >


Thanks to our social-media followers for submitting some great questions for Kim—and many thanks to Kim for answering them!

What would your first quilt from Kim’s new book be made with: scraps or precuts? Tell us in the comments and you could win a copy of the Scrap-Basket Strips and Squares eBook! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.

Can’t wait to get started? Buy the book now and instantly download the eBook for free. Or buy the eBook for just $16.99.

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Thanks to all who entered the drawing! The winner is Vicki, who says:

“I would definitely use precuts as I’ve only made a few quilts so I’m building up my stash. Kim, thank you for this opportunity to win a copy of your new book.”

Vicki, we’ll email you about your prize. Congratulations!


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