1. Need to make a quilt sandwich in a hurry? Spray basting to the rescue (how-to)

    Bon-Appetit-Table-RunnerAs the holidays draw near, do visions of quilty gifts dance in your head?

    Do you wonder how many gifts you can start and finish before Christmas?

    Do you assume you’ll be burning the midnight oil—along with Santa and his reindeer—come Christmas Eve?

    Often it’s not block-making or row-sewing that halts our gift-making progress: it’s the finishing.

    All finishing starts with step one, before the quilting stage: the “sandwich” stage. Layering the quilt top, batting, and backing in preparation for quilting can be time-consuming. But the following tutorial on spray basting will speed up this important step. In an excerpt from Free-Motion Quilting for Beginners, author Molly Hanson explains how she gets it done in a snap.


    Speedy quilt sandwich: spray basting

    From Free-Motion Quilting for Beginners—and those who think they can’t by Molly Hanson

    Free-Motion Quilting for BeginnersBasting spray is a time-saver in a can—literally! While it may take me two to three hours to pin baste a queen-size quilt, I can spray baste the same quilt in about 45 minutes. Interested in learning more? I bet you are!

    I especially like to spray baste small projects. I spray baste by hanging my quilt on a wall. First, I hang up some newspaper roughly around the area where my backing will be, which makes cleanup a breeze. I then tack the quilt backing to the wall, with the right side facing the wall, using thumbtacks every few inches across the top edge of the fabric and making sure the backing is smooth and flat. Then, after laying more newspaper on the floor beneath the backing, I spray baste following the manufacturer’s instructions.
    spacer 10px deep

    How to spray baste a quilt
    Spray basting a quilt, from
    Free-Motion Quilting for Beginners

    I tumble my batting in the dryer for about 15 minutes to reduce wrinkles and static. Once the backing is lightly coated with basting spray (and still pinned in place on the wall), I remove the batting from the dryer and, starting along the top edge, I pat the batting in place. Take your time to carefully position and stick the batting to the backing, making sure the batting is smooth. Once the batting is in place, spray the batting (as you did the backing before) and adhere the quilt top to the batting in the same way. And that’s it! It’s a very fast and easy process—and quite addictive if I do say so myself.


    Get all of Molly’s tips from Free-Motion Quilting for Beginners right now—in print book or eBook form—and get confident about your Christmas list! Plus, you can turn practice pieces into 15 functional projects that are perfect for gifts.
    spacer 10px deep

    From Free-Motion Quilting for Beginners
    Projects from Free-Motion Quilting for Beginners, all made from practice pieces.

    How do you usually baste your quilts: pins, thread, or spray? Tell us in the comments—and share your tips for quick finishing if you’ve got ’em!

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  2. Time is running out to vote for BIG savings during our warehouse sale!

    Posted by on November 7, 2016, in quilting & sewing, ,

    Our warehouse sale is going strong—have you taken advantage of the incredible savings yet? Think of how much inspiration could be at your fingertips for just five bucks a book!

    Five bucks a book warehouse sale!

    Your creative side is waiting, so start shopping now—but hurry, the last day to enjoy these amazing savings is tomorrow. At midnight (PST) on November 9, they’ll be gone!


    Which books have you snagged for a steal during our warehouse sale? Tell us your favorites in the comments!

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  3. Behind the scenes: the International Quilt Study Center and Museum

    IQSCM

    We recently had a one-of-a-kind opportunity to visit the International Quilt Study Center and Museum (IQSCM) in Lincoln, Nebraska, and assist with the photography of quilts in their collection. The IQSCM is home to more than 5,000 quilts and quilt-related pieces that span 50 countries and four centuries of quiltmaking.

    IQSCM-building
    The International Quilt Study Center and Museum

    We were delighted to play a part in recording the history of many quilts in the museum’s collection, and we’re thrilled to support its mission: to uncover the world through the cultural and artistic significance of quilts, and to research, acquire, and exhibit them in all their forms and expressions. It’s a mission close to our hearts.

    Antique-quilt
    One of the many antique quilts photographed.

    Brent Kane, Martingale’s photographer, spent several days at the museum, learning about their collection and photographing numerous quilts for archival purposes. We asked Brent a few questions about his visit. Here’s what he shared.


    Stitch This!: What was your purpose for visiting the International Quilt Study Center and Museum (IQSCM)? What quilts did you go to photograph, and why? Was there a date range?

    Brent: The center had a backlog of quilts that needed to be photographed, as well as some questions about the technical aspects of their photographic setup and workflow. I shot over 200 quilts while I was there. The quilts I saw ranged from more than 200 years old to less than 20 years old.

    ST!: Were all the quilts you photographed flat?

    Brent: No, there were dimensional quilted objects as well. One was a quilted camel-hump cover that might have been part of a wedding ceremony.

    Brent-with-volunteers
    Brent discussing with volunteers how best to photograph an antique ceremonial quilted camel-hump cover.

    This antique camel-hump cover was made as a three-dimensional piece. Rather than try to flatten its three-dimensional nature, we decided to shoot it from four views to record all portions of the design. Each shot shows the piece folded in a different way.

    Antique-quilted-camel-cover

    Part of the same acquisition was this string of quilted blocks.

    String-of-quilted-blocks

    ST!: How are the quilts stored? What about security?

    BRENT: The quilts are stored in a tornado-proof section of the building with climate control and locked steel doors.

    Archival boxes
    Archival boxes are labeled with identification numbers.

    52_IQSCM
    Exterior view: sliding sections of quilt-storage shelves.

    56_IQSCM
    Sometimes quilts are stored flat due to the nature of the quilt. This one, known as the Button Quilt, weighs 40 pounds and is almost entirely composed of buttons sewn onto a fabric backing.

    ST!: Were there any restrictions given to you about handling the quilts? What did you learn about protecting and preserving quilts?

    Brent: I didn’t touch any of the quilts; instead, staff members and volunteers who are specially trained in the handling of the quilts were always there to help. The IQSCM has exacting procedures for folding and storing quilts. For example, when quilts are folded, fabric never touches fabric—there’s always a layer of acid-free archival tissue paper layered in between.

    Folding antique quilts
    A quilt being carefully folded with layers of acid-free tissue.

    I shot a video of how the staff and volunteers unfolded and refolded a Dresden Plate quilt. You can see how much care they take with each piece.

    Reading this post in email? Click here to watch the video.

    ST!: Was there any particular quilt that jumped out at you as being unique?

    Brent: What struck me most was the impressions I got of the makers of quilts. Quilters are generally very giving, humble, tactile, visual, caring, and industrious. I experienced that same spirit throughout my stay.


    You can learn more about the IQSCM collection here.

    Discover how the center acquires quilts for their collection.

    Find out about their latest exhibit and learn what exhibits are coming soon.

    Plan your visit.

    The International Quilt Study Center and Museum in Lincoln, Nebraska: been there, planning to go there soon, or putting a trip to the IQSCM on your bucket list? Tell us in the comments.

    5 bucks a book warehouse sale!

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  4. Wish List Day! Scrappy little quilts, Churn Dash 💕 + more (+ giveaway!)

    Thanks for joining us on Wish List Day—our favorite day of the month! What books are coming your way in December? Sit back and enjoy the inspiration! And remember, you could win your favorite book if you let us know your choice at the end of this post.


    SUBSCRIBE-to-Stitch-ThisSubscribe to our blog
    and you’ll always get a first look at new Martingale quilt books, plus special sales, freebies, tutorials, and more.

    December-2016

    Small and ScrappySmall and Scrappy: Pint-Size Patchwork Quilts Using Reproduction Fabrics
    Kathleen Tracy

    Wish-list Notify-me

    Don’t toss your precious reproduction scraps—here’s the perfect way to use them all! These tiny treasures are full of scrappy charm, and they sew up in a snap. Sweet vignettes offer unique display ideas for little quilts, and Kathleen’s smart tips for scrap organization will help you avoid a jumbled pile. Keep Small and Scrappy by your fabric-cutting area: every time you create a new pile of scraps, you’ll have this inspiring resource at the ready.


    Square-in-a-Square-quilt
    Square-in-a-Square quilt from
    Small and Scrappy

    This way to more scrappy little quilts >


    Block-Buster Quilts: I Love Churn DashesBlock-Buster Quilts I Love Churn Dashes: 15 Quilts from an All-Time Favorite Block
    Compiled by Karen M. Burns

    Wish-list Notify-me

    It’s the third book in our “Block-Buster Quilts” series! This beautiful compilation is dedicated to a classic quilt block that’s known by many names: Monkey Wrench, Double Wrench, Hole in the Barn Door, Lincoln’s Platform—we know and love it as timeless Churn Dash. Watch how some of today’s popular designers stretch this easy-to-sew block in new design directions. From on-point and off-center renditions to teeny-tiny Churns and mammoth Dashes, you’ll love playing with Churn Dash in ways you’ve never tried before.

    Quilts-from-I-Love-Churn-Dashes
    Clockwise from top left: Butterscotch and Blue by Jo Morton; Sweet Cream by Kimberly Jolly; In Reverse by Kate Henderson; Toast and Cheddar by Kim Diehl.

    See more Churn Dash love >


    The New Hexagon Coloring BookThe New Hexagon Coloring Book: 60 Hexagon Designs to Color
    Katja Marek

    Wish-list Notify-me

    Join the hexagon craze AND the coloring craze! Both hot topics unite in this fun new coloring book especially for quilters. Color 60 captivating hexagon designs inspired by the work of Katja Marek, author of the runaway best seller The New Hexagon. Ask Santa to bring you a copy and a big box of colored pencils for Christmas!

    Sample-pages-from-The-New-Hexagon-Coloring-Book
    Examples of coloring pages

    See more sample pages >


    9 Months to Crochet9 Months to Crochet: Count Down to the Big Day with Crochet!
    Maaike van Koert

    Wish-list Notify-me

    If you know of a baby on the way—or one who’s just arrived—you’ll love spoiling them silly with these precious projects. Crochet clothing, blankets, toys, and more in classic styles with a clean, modern twist. Organized to celebrate each trimester leading up to Baby’s birth day, 9 Months to Crochet includes crochet projects to pamper the mom-to-be too. What a wonderful way to say “welcome!”

    (New to crochet? Crochet basics are covered step by step, so even beginners can jump right in.)

    Projects-from-9-Months-to-Crochet
    Projects from
    9 Months to Crochet

    Don’t miss the Sleepy Sheep mobile—too cute! >


    Which new book would make your December even more delightful? Tell us in the comments and you could win an eBook copy of your favorite book when it’s released! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.

    Comments are closed for this post.

    Thanks to all who entered the drawing. The winner is Marion, who says:

    “Churn Dashes would be my choice. I have many scrap book/patterns. I do love the churn dash and would love to see some new ideas using this block.”

    We’ll email you about your prize, Marion—congratulations!

    November-books-available-now

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  5. Vote for change we can all agree on (more pocket change)

    Posted by on October 31, 2016, in quilting & sewing,

    Wondering who’ll win the election? We are too—but today we’re voting to make more room in our warehouse for the beautiful books coming in 2017. And that means BIG savings for you!

    Five-bucks-a-book

    Cast your ballot by checking the boxes for your choice of new books. Our promise: Whatever you elect to purchase, there’s a new favorite project in your future!

    Start adding inspiring how-to books—only $5 each—to your shopping cart at ShopMartingale.com. Choose from more than 100 books! And no matter how many books you buy, you can bank on this: you’ll end up with some hefty leftover pocket change at these blockbuster prices.

    Choose from featured books below OR visit this link to browse all books on sale for $5 each. But don’t delay—quantities are limited and we can’t guarantee that we won’t run out of stock during this epic sale!

    Free-shippingP.S. Remember, whenever your purchase totals $40 or more, we’ll pay for your shipping in the US and Canada.

    Happy stitching!

    Browse-books

    QUILTING BOOKS

    Kim Diehl books: unheard-of prices!

    Simple Blessings Simple Comforts Simple Graces

    Christmas books: it’s just around the corner!

    Christmas Is Coming Celebrate Christmas with That Patchwork Place Handmade Christmas Cheer

    Antique-style quilts: sew many scrappy delights!

    Remembering Adelia Fancy to Frugal The Civil War Sewing Circle Candy Store and More

    Quilts for precuts: you know you love ’em!

    Country Threads Goes to Charm School Jelly Babies A Cut Above Quilts from Sweet Jane

    Browse-books

    SEWING BOOKS

    Baby Says Sew Sewing Pottery by Machine Sew Practical Little Big Stuff

    Browse-books

    KNITTING BOOKS

    All about Knitting The NEW Knitter's Template Knit a Monster Nursery Seamless (or Nearly Seamless) Knits

    Browse-books

    CROCHET BOOKS

    The Essential Book of Crochet Techniques Happy-gurumi Grammy's Favorite Knits for Baby Tunisian Crochet Encore

    Browse-books

    *Free shipping to U.S. and Canada only. All sales are final. Due to order volume, processing may take up to 15 days to process. (But our shipping department rocks—your books will arrive as soon as humanly possible!)

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  6. Seams: to glue or not to glue? Watch this video first

    Sew, Slice, Spin & SashWhile it’s fun to have long-term quilting projects to work on—challenging quilts that might take months or even years to finish—I frequently find myself on a much tighter deadline. Maybe there’s a new baby on the way or a friend in need of comfort, and time really is of the essence.

    Theresa Ward’s book Sew, Slice, Spin & Sash: Quick and Easy Strip-Pieced Quilts comes in handy in a tight-turnaround situation, or as I like to call it, a quilt-mergency. Not only is Theresa’s fun sew-slice-spin-and-sash construction method super speedy, her glue-basting technique will also save you precious time.

    Glue-basting-technique

    I must confess, until I saw Theresa demonstrate her glue technique, I had a pretty strict no-glue policy when it came to quiltmaking. Count me converted! Gluing the seam allowances of long strips this way is so much faster than pinning, and I’ve also found that it’s more accurate. Plus, Theresa’s ingenious little DIY gluing gadget prevents the making of icky, sticky messes. She was kind enough to let us record her method at Spring Quilt Market so we could share it with you here:

    Reading this post in email? Click here to watch the video.

    So simple, right? I also appreciate how glue basting makes it quick and easy to realign your edges if need be. Along with this handy technique, Sew, Slice, Spin & Sash includes 11 fantastic quilt patterns, so you’ll be prepared for any quilt-mergency that comes your way.

    The Black and White quilt below is one of the quickest patterns, and it would be a great option for using any black-and-white precut strips or Jelly Rolls in your stash. If black and white isn’t your thing, this design would be equally striking in any other color combination. Perhaps a red-and-green quilt for Christmas? Armed with Theresa’s glue-basting technique, you’re practically guaranteed to finish by December 25th!

    Black and white quilt
    Black and White from
    Sew, Slice, Spin & Slash

    See more from Sew, Slice, Spin & Sash >

    Do you ever use glue basting to secure seams? Tell us in the comments!


    Special event! If you’re headed to Quilt Market in Houston, don’t miss the Dueling Quilters events – and if you can’t make it to Market, join us for Martingale’s first Facebook Live event! Meet us at 3:00 p.m. (CST) Saturday, October 29, on our Facebook page and watch superstar machine quilters Angela Walters (on the long-arm) and Christa Watson (on the sit-down) battle it out with quilting motifs from their best-selling book, The Ultimate Guide to Machine Quilting. Mark you calendars for some machine-quilting fun – LIVE this Saturday!

    Facebook Live event: The Ultimate Dueling Machine Quilters


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  7. From The Splendid Sampler: stitch a Splendid basket handle!

    Karen-SoltysWhen Pat Sloan asked me to participate in The Splendid Sampler Sew-Along by designing an original block that signified my life as a quilter, I immediately knew I would design some sort of basket block. During my years of quiltmaking, I’ve made many basket blocks—both pieced and appliquéd. I love baskets—I use them for holding knitting, rug-hooking, and sewing supplies; I have a few antique baskets I treasure; and I’ve even learned to weave my own baskets.

    That said, one type of basket I’ve never made—woven from reed or stitched in fabric—is a swing-handle basket. So I set my sights on designing one of those to share with all those participating in the Splendid Sampler. (You can download the pattern at The Splendid Sampler website.)

    To make my block, you simply need basic patchwork skills. But the handle is appliquéd, and I thought it would be fun to share with you today the technique I used. Yes, I said “appliquéd,” but you can do it by machine and it’s really quite easy, once you know the secret.

    1. Start with a bias strip. Cut your fabric at a 45° angle to the straight of grain so that you’ll have the greatest amount of flexibility with the handle. I cut my strips 1″ wide by about 8″ long. (Don’t worry if the strip is too long; you’ll trim it later.) Fold the strip in half lengthwise, with the wrong sides together, and press.

    photo-1---press-bias-1

    Tip: Use a stripe or check for the basket handle for a realistic and fun result. In my original block, I used a stripe. On the sample shown here, I used a check that was printed on the diagonal.

    1. Use a drinking glass to mark the curve of the handle on the block. You can use a pencil or Frixion pen or whatever marking tool you like. The mark will be covered by the handle, so don’t worry about it showing up later.

    photo-2---mark-arc-1

    1. Place the prepared basket handle along the marked curve, with the raw edges touching the marked line and the folded edge of the fabric closest to the basket portion of the block. Let the end of the basket handle extend beyond the seam where the background meets the basket fabric.

    photo 3 - pin bias

    1. Sew about 1/8" inch from the raw edges of the handle and the marked line, starting exactly at the seamline between the basket and background fabrics. Gently ease the handle around the curve as you sew. Don’t stretch it or pull it too taut as you go. You’ll need to have enough ease to flip it up and over your stitching when you’re done. To create a nice smooth curve, be sure to lift your presser foot every few stitches so you can pivot as you sew. Stop sewing when you reach the seamline at the end of the curve.

    photo-4-and-5---sew-bias

    1. At the ironing board, fold the basket handle up and over the stitching. (I know, it seems like it just won’t work. But you can do it!) Use the tip of the iron to coax the handle over; use an awl if needed to hold the fabric in place so you don’t burn your fingers. Press the handle firmly in place; it may require steam. Make sure the block lies flat and isn’t puckered.

    photo-6---press-handle-over-1

    1. Sew the folded side of the basket handle in place. You can stitch by hand if you like, or you can use a narrow zigzag stitch along the edge as I did. You can even use a straight stitch, sewing very close to the edge of the handle to secure it.

    photo-7---narrow-zigzag-1

    1. Hand sew a small button to each end of the handle, just above the basket fabric. I left the ends of the handle loose; I snipped them off at a pleasing angle, which added a bit of dimensional texture to the basket.

    photo 8 - finished block

    And now, a moment many of you might be waiting for . . . a peek at The Splendid Sampler book!

    Confidential-Splendid-Sampler

    Yes, just a small peek. But stay tuned, there will be more to peek at soon!


    Thanks for visiting us at Martingale’s Stitch This! blog—be sure to subscribe to our posts so we can meet again soon. Happy basket making!

    How far along are you in the Splendid Sampler Sew-Along? Tell us in the comments.

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  8. Short on sewing time? Fill it with *This and That* 😉 (+ giveaway!)

    Love to sew, but feel like you’re always watching the clock? We feel the same. Sometimes it seems like there’s never enough time to start a sewing project, let alone finish it!

    That’s exactly why popular designer Sherri K. Falls wrote her new book, Sew This and That!—because she knows what it’s like to be busy too. And she understands that’s when we need to spend our precious sewing time on projects that are small, simple, and fast to finish. And Sherri’s fun little projects just happen to be irresistibly sweet too!

    In Sew This and That!, Sherri explains what inspires her patterns:

    Quote-from-Sherri-Falls

    You’ll find instant success (and instant gratification) in Sherri’s collection of little quilts, pillows, pouches, and more. Plus, many projects pair up perfectly with 5″ precut charm packs.

    Projects-from-Sew-This-and-That
    Projects from
    Sew This and That!

    Don’t you love her happy color choices?

    We’re excited to welcome Sherri as a guest writer today, here to tell us more about what’s inside Sew This and That!


    Sew This and That!I’m so excited to announce my first book with Martingale! Sew This and That! is filled with quick-and-easy projects that you can accomplish in a weekend, or even in a day.

    I’ve always enjoyed designing smaller projects, as life can be very busy, but it’s important to find a little time for yourself to sew. Smaller projects make great gifts, and they often use precut fabrics that give your project a fun, scrappy look without having to buy yardage. I love having precuts on my shelf, ready to use anytime. Plus they are so cute!

    Button-Bliss-pouch
    Button Bliss pouch, made from a charm pack.

    A fun variety of projects includes pillows, bags, and table runners, to name a few. Projects rely on traditional piecing and even some embroidery. A tip I like to give when stitchers want to do an embroidery project in different colors (and you should if you’d like to—make it your own!) is to start with the main fabric they’ll be using, and add accent fabrics to that. When you’re done choosing your fabrics, pick the colors of floss from the colors in your fabrics and your project will come together.

    Bird-Watching-Pillow
    Bird-Watching Pillow

    You’ll find several bag patterns in Sew This and That!, in a variety of sizes. I’m a huge lover of bags. I don’t think I can ever have enough bags! And please don’t be scared of the zippers—the methods I use in the book are easy to learn. Just give zippers a try.

    All-Squared-Up-tote
    All Squared Up Tote

    Another thing I like about smaller projects, besides the fact that I feel very accomplished in a short time, is that I can make quick but beautiful gifts for friends. The embroidery projects are great for taking on the go and the Sew Organized Clutch can help you stay organized. I love projects that not only keep my stuff together, but they look cute while doing it.

    Sew-Organized-Clutch
    Sew Organized Clutch

    I hope you enjoy making the projects as much as I enjoyed designing them for you. I would love to see what you make! You can find me on Instagram at @sherfalls and on Facebook at This & That Patterns.


    Thanks for giving us a peek into your beautiful book, Sherri!

    When it comes to your precious sewing time, do you:

    a) Sew almost every day.

    b) Sew at least once a week.

    c) Become sew, sew sad when you realize it’s been too long? 😥

    Tell us your answer in the comments and you could win a copy of the Sew This and That! eBook! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.

    Want to whip up a small and speedy project with Sherri today? Order Sew This and That! at our website and instantly download the eBook for free.

    Comments are closed for this post.

    Thanks to all who entered the drawing. The winner is Diane, who says:

    “b) I try to sew at least once a week but it doesn’t always happen!”

    We’ll email you about your prize, Diane—congratulations!

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  9. Cut, sew, give, repeat: super-quick charity quilts

    october-24-sale

    BarbaraQuilters are truly giving and generous people. They donate countless handmade items to support charities and individuals in need. When a sudden need pops up due to a natural disaster or other horrific event, somebody, somewhere, immediately starts a drive to make and donate a quilt or other comfort item. What a great way to give back to the community—and the most beautiful thing of all is that we get back as much as we give. We get to practice the beautiful art of patchwork and maybe even grow our skills a little.

    There are many organizations that accept quilt donations. Below, you’ll find a short list of national organizations that distribute quilts to people in need. Short on quilting time? Most organizations will accept monetary and/or supply donations as well. Please be sure to read the guidelines carefully before donating to any charitable organization.

    ✔ Project Linus provides comfort and security to children who are seriously ill, traumatized, or otherwise in need through gifts of new, handmade blankets and afghans, lovingly created by volunteer “blanketeers.”

    ✔ Binky Patrol distributes quilts to children who are born HIV-positive, drug-addicted, infected with AIDS or who have other chronic or terminal illnesses, and to children who have been abused, are in foster care, or are experiencing trauma of any kind.

    ✔ Quilts of Valor has a mission “to cover service members and veterans touched by war with comforting and healing quilts.”

    ✔ American Hero Quilts provides “recognition and appreciation to our wounded service men and women who served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.”

    ✔ The One Million Pillowcase Challenge, created by our friends at American Patchwork and Quilting, challenges those who quilt and sew to help reach a goal of donating one million pillowcases to charity. As of this writing, 701,749 pillowcases have been donated!

    This is by no means a complete list! There are many, many more organizations that accept quilts. If you want to keep it local, check with your local guild. Guilds often have a local charity (or two, or more) that they support. You can find your local quilt guild here and here.

    Related: Lift your spirits: stories of charity quilts, shared by you

    If you’re looking for quick charity-quilt patterns, browse our eBooks on sale this week for some fast and easy designs.


    From Four-Patch Frolic: Make Four Patch blocks two at a time; then add strips above and below. Done and done! Imagine this 50″ x 50″ quilt in sweet pastels for Baby or in scrappy red, white, and blue fabrics for a patriotic lap quilt. Make a few extra Four Patch blocks to turn into darling pincushions for your quilting buddies (instructions included).

    Aunt-Bea-quilt
    Aunt Bea quilt and Easy Pincushions from Four-Patch Frolic


    From Sew One and You’re Done: These giant one-block quilts range in size from 45″ to 56″ square—just the right size for baby quilts. Big pieces, easy patchwork, big fun! Inside you’ll also find lots of advice for starting a charity-quilt group.

    Sew-One-and-Youre-Done
    Left: Heartstring Quilters with pieced tops they made for charity from Sew One and You’re Done. Right: Cowlitz Prairie Crazy Quilters with their charity quilt tops.


    From Pick Four: Sometimes choosing fabrics can be the most time-consuming part of making a quilt, but not with this Stepping Stones quilt—just pick four fabrics and you’re off! Based on a Nine Patch block, the quilt is deceptively simple to sew. Switch out the green for a navy-blue fabric and you’ve got a beautiful quilt to thank a solider for his or her service.

    Stepping-Stones
    Stepping Stones quilt


    From Rolling Along: This String Square design is a great choice when you want to make a quick quilt. Alternate blue and red string blocks with a white background for a patriotic quilt; skip the border and breeze through 16 blocks for a fast baby quilt.

    String-Square-quilt 1
    String Square quilt (also available as an ePattern)


    Do you know a charity that accepts quilts and is close to your heart? Please share it in the comments!

    october-24-sale

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  10. ⏰ Flash sale! Wonderful quilts for walls, all year long

    best-wall-quilts-flash-sale

    Wall quilts are magic-makers in the decorating world. Need to brighten a corner, add a splash of color, cozy up a space? A quilt on a wall does that and much more.

    Tulip-Parade-quiltIf you’ve never hung a quilt on a wall in your home, today is the day to choose a wall quilt to make, and give it a try. Why? Because the eBook Best Wall Quilts from McCall’s Quilting will inspire you with a variety of gorgeous choices—and you’ll be surprised at how the quilt you create will instantly transform the look and feel of a room. Plus, wall quilts showcase our passion for sewing!

    The fact that the Best Wall Quilts eBook is on sale for only six bucks might inspire you too. 😊 Take a look at just a few beautiful options from the book:

    Welcome-quilt
    Let guests know they’ve entered a quilter’s home right at the front door! This Welcome quilt marries a traditional quilt design with contemporary fabrics.

    Apple-Blossom-Time-quilt
    How clever is the placement of this sweet Apple Blossom Time quilt? The quilt pops inside an open cabinet and serves as a backdrop for treasured collectibles.

    Shimmering-Squares-quilt
    Scrap-quilt lovers, this is your jam. Search your stash for batiks to use in this statement-maker as shown, or envision the design in your favorite fabrics. Can you imagine how amazing this would look with a scattering of nineteenth-century reproduction scraps?

    See more from Best Wall Quilts >>>

    Now, when you’re home, take a moment. Look around and choose a spot for the wall quilt you’ll make. Download Best Wall Quilts and choose the perfect quilt for that space. Then go to you stash or your local quilt shop and let the fun begin!

    P.S. Don’t forget to snap a pic when your quilt is on the wall! 📷 We’d love to see it! Use the hashtag #madewithmartingale on social media or send your photo to jenny@martingale-pub.com.

    Do you have a quilt on a wall in your home? Tell us in the comments!

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