1. Yetis, monster, robots—oh my! 12 spooky projects

    Martingale's Knit & Crochet Friday


    Halloween knitting roundup

    Boo! It’s October 31, and we have a special Halloween-themed knitting roundup—all sourced from our resident monster expert and best-selling author, Rebecca Danger. From mini yetis and other small Halloween knitting projects to monster booties and caps for babies, this roundup will inspire your spooky Friday. These projects are cute enough to be played with and worn all year long, so pick up one (or more) of Rebecca’s books at your local yarn shop or ShopMartingale.com, and consider it a Halloween treat to yourself!

    From 50 Yards of Fun
    Find robots, ninjas, a luchador, a yeti, and more mini characters in 50 Yards of Fun. These patterns can be knit with approximately 50 yards or less of yarn!

    From The Big Book of Knitted Monsters
    Monsters galore, from kitchen monsters to monster families, can be found in The Big Book of Knitted Monsters. Knit one to keep you safe on Halloween night and all year round!

    From Knit a Monster Nursery
    Forget costumes—baby can be comfy and adorable in the monster booties, beanie, and hoodie towel from Knit a Monster Nursery. BONUS: you’ll also find nursery decor ideas and a whole roomful of practical items to knit for baby!

    Get even more value when you buy the eBook version of any of these books. You can get an instant download for less than $15. Talk about a screamin’ deal (wink!).


    Do you go out on Halloween, or stay in to greet trick-or-treaters? Tell us in the comments!


    $6 eBooks this week only


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  2. Mom tested, baby approved: 20 ways to sew for Baby (+ giveaway!)

    Posted by on October 30, 2014, in quilting & sewing, , ,

    Today is all about cute babies. And fun sewing. And fun sewing for cute babies.

    Sewing for baby--Super Bibs
    “Super Bibs” from
    Baby Says Sew

    Baby Says SewAs a mom to a three-year-old and a baby born in March, Rebecca Danger is smitten with her new role. Already a three-time bestselling knitting-book author, her little ones inspired her to return to her sewing roots. In her new book Baby Says Sew, this creative mom shares 20 sweet toys, garments, and nursery essentials that have been tested and approved by her toddler son—and are now going through a second round of tests by her brand-new baby.

    Projects to sew during naptimeTrue to a mommy mindset, Rebecca’s adorable projects are not only quick to sew; they’re also intentionally budget friendly. And no need to stress about time to make these items: each is rated by how many of Baby’s naptimes it will take to create. How handy is that?

    Plus…there are the awww-inspiring photos of babies.

    Sewing turtles for baby

    See? Awww!

    Take a peek inside the chapters of Baby Says Sew below. Then just try to resist the urge to sew one of these darling projects for every baby you meet.

    Sewing for baby--Turtle Stacker
    CHAPTER 1: PLAYTIME.
    Switch out classic rings for colorful turtles and what do you get? A turtle stacker! Turtles attach with fat squares of Velcro; make all five or stitch just one as a special huggable toy.

    See 3 more playtime projects in Baby Says Sew >


    Sewing for baby--Baby Legwarmers
    CHAPTER 2: CLOTHING.
    Transform an inexpensive pair of women’s knee-high socks into adorable leg warmers (rival boutique versions cost a bundle). Rebecca’s pattern is so easy—only three steps!

    Make cozy knit hats—and karate pants too!—in Baby Says Sew >


    Sewing for baby--Counting Sheep Mobile
    CHAPTER 3: BEDTIME.
    Send baby to sleep counting sheep! Whip up this sweet mobile with craft felt and an embroidery hoop.

    Make a plush mama sheep to watch over these little lambs >


    Sewing for baby--Mei Tai Baby Carrier
    CHAPTER 4: ON THE GO.
    Pricey baby carriers get a low-cost makeover with this “Mei Tai” carrier that you can personalize with fun fabrics. Simply wrap, tie, and you’re off!

    Make a superhero cape/blanket and a toy-storing pocket blanket too >


    Sewing for baby--Changing Organizer
    CHAPTER 5: CLEANUP.
    This organizer does double duty—first as a place to store items at the changing table; then as an activity center for older kids in the crib.

    Keep things tidy with 4 more cleanup projects in Baby Says Sew >

    Karen, our director of sales and marketing, couldn’t help but make Rebecca’s fun “Taggle Blocks” before Baby Says Sew was released—she ended up with the perfect toys to pair with a baby quilt she’d made.

    Karen's taggle blocks from Baby Says Sew
    Karen made three sizes of blocks; the largest was made from the pattern in
    Baby Says Sew.

    You can find more of Rebecca’s playful projects in her bestselling knitting books:

    50 Yards of Fun Knit a Monster Nursery The Big Book of Knitted Monsters


    Do you know a baby who’d love a special something from Baby Says Sew? Tell us about him or her in the comments and you could win a copy of the book! We’ll choose a winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.

    But wait…Just one more baby pic:

    Sewing for baby--hooded towel
    “Hooded Towel” from Baby Says Sew

    Awww! Happy sewing!


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  3. Staff stitch + show: look what we made!

    Martingale Staff Stitch + Show!

    It’s been a few months since I’ve done a staff show-and-tell post. The finished projects are piling up around here, so it’s time for another!


    Perfect for Retreats

    Let’s start with Karen Burns, our acquisitions editor. Karen’s favorite time to stitch is at quilting retreats. She returns from a three-day weekend and amazes us with how many quilt tops she’s completed! Her trick? She collects Jelly Rolls and Layer Cakes. She spends time precutting every project, creating a kit for each quilt. When she arrives at a retreat, she’s ready to do some serious chain piecing. Here are just a few from her latest getaway weekends:

    Karen's quilt from Large-Block Quilts
    From Large-Block Quilts by Victoria L. Eapen.

    Karen's quilts from Skip the Borders
    From Skip the Borders by Julie Herman. Look how versatile this pattern is! Any fabric collection will work. (You might notice that when Karen gets attached to a pattern, she keeps making it.)

    More of Karen's quilts from Skip the Borders
    Also from Skip the Borders.

    Karen's quilt from Urban Country Quilts
    From Urban Country Quilts by Jeanne Large and Shelley Wicks.

    Karen's quilt from Rolling Along
    From Rolling Along by Nancy J. Martin.

    Karen's quilt from Homestyle Quilts
    From Homestyle Quilts by Kim Diehl and Laurie Baker.

    Karen's quilt from Simple Seasons
    From Simple Seasons by Kim Diehl.


    Never Enough Kim Diehl

    We know many of you are Kim Diehl fans. You’re not alone. As you can see, we love her patterns too! Our publisher and chief visionary officer, Jennifer Keltner, made this treasure to add to her collection of Kim Diehl quilts.

    Jennifer's quilt from Simple Traditions
    “Quaint and Charming Lap Quilt” from Simple Traditions by Kim Diehl.


    Seasonal Quilts

    Cathy, our author liaison, is getting ready for the holidays. Starting with fall pumpkins, she’s prepared all the way through winter!

    Cathy's runner from A Fresh Look at Seasonal Quilts
    “Pumpkin Runner” from A Fresh Look at Seasonal Quilts by Julie Popa.

    Cathy's quilt from Celebrate Christmas with That Patchwork Place
    “’O Christmas Tree” pattern by Adrienne Smitke, from Celebrate Christmas with That Patchwork Place®.

    Cathy's quilt from A Fresh Look at Seasonal Quilts
    “Cold Hands, Warm Hearts” from A Fresh Look at Seasonal Quilts by Julie Popa.

    Linda, our office receptionist and tour guide, is also ready for the holidays. She whipped up this beauty using colorful Halloween fabrics!

    Linda's quilt from Beyond Neutral
    “Glimmerglass” from Beyond Neutral by John Q. Adams.

    It’s such a treat to work with so many creative souls. Too much fabric? Too many UFOs?  Not words you’ll ever hear in our hallways! We’ve already got nine staff projects stockpiled to show next time. Stay tuned!


    What’s your favorite season to create quilts for: fall, winter, spring, or summer? Tell us in the comments!


    $6 eBooks this week only


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  4. Quick crafts for Halloween

    Posted by on October 28, 2014, in quilting & sewing, , ,

    Did Halloween sneak up on you this year? I find that although I always have the best intentions to decorate my home or my office cubicle, I end up scrambling at the last minute to do just a little something to commemorate the holiday. Read on for a few “quickie crafts” that you can do if you’re like me.

    Looking for a fast but fun way to hand out little treats? These “Ghost and Pumpkin Party Favors” are quick to make and delightful to receive, as are these cute “Halloween Party Crackers.”

    Quick Halloween crafts
    “Ghost and Pumpkin Party Favors” from
    Creepy, Crafty Halloween and “Halloween Party Crackers” from Hocus Pocus.

    Do you need a Halloween-themed container for handing out candy to the little ghosts and goblins who’ll be at your door in a couple of days? This painted and stenciled ice bucket would work beautifully as a candy bowl. Or, use a “carveable pumpkin” from the craft store to make a simplified version of this pumpkin basket!

    Quick Halloween crafts
    “Haunted House Ice Bucket” and “Glittered Pumpkin Basket” from
    Hocus Pocus.

    If you want to add a spooky glow to your porch or window, these paper lanterns come together quickly with a little black construction paper, an X-Acto knife, tissue paper or vellum, and a glow stick.

    Halloween paper lanterns
    “Paper Lanterns” from
    Creepy Crafty Halloween.

    For a homemade treat, why not whip up these yummy pumpkin bars or dip some pretzels?

    Halloween treats from Hocus Pocus
    “Pumpkin Bars” and “Candy-Coated Pretzels” from
    Hocus Pocus.

    And if you didn’t decorate or make anything fun for this year’s festivities, well, there’s always next year! Here are some Halloween quilt projects that you can get started on NOW.

    Things that Grin in the Night quilt
    “Things that Grin in the Night” from
    Simple Seasons by Kim Diehl.

    Step into Halloween quilt
    “Step into Halloween” from
    Patchwork Plus by Geralyn Powers.

    Pick a Pumpkin quilt
    “Pick a Pumpkin” from
    Slash Your Stash.

    Pumpkin Wool Table Runner
    “Pumpkin Wool Table Runner” from
    A Fresh Look at Seasonal Quilts by Julie Popa.


    Are you ready for Halloween? Tell us in the comments below! Happy Halloween!


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  5. Six-buck eBooks all October! Final week: quick gifts

    Select eBooks on sale for $6 each this week!

    FINAL WEEK: QUICK GIFTS

    Need ideas for gifts to make for Christmas—or any time of year? Stock your computer, laptop, or tablet with Martingale quilt books featuring fun gift ideas that’ll get you to the finish line quick! Download eBooks instantly and start stitching just minutes from now. Only $6 each this week.

    Sale ends at midnight on Sunday, November 2.


    Bits and Pieces:
    18 Small Quilts from Fat Quarters and Scraps
    by Karen Costello Soltys
    $18.99 $6.00

    Bits and Pieces

    Amazon review: “Great quilts – great color combinations – and quick to finish. A+”

    Choose from 18 make-in-a-day quilts for fat quarters, fat eighths, and scraps >


    Sew One and You’re Done:
    Making a Quilt from a Single Block
    by Evelyn Sloppy
    $16.99 $6.00

    Sew One and You're Done

     Amazon review: “These quilts work up in a couple of days and are wonderful gifts. Everyone should have this book!”

    1 supersized block + 3 to 5 fabrics = a beautiful, traditional quilt in no time >


    Celebrations!:
    Quilts for Cherished Family Moments
    by Mary M. Covey
    $14.95 $6.00

    Celebrations!

    Commemorate life’s little triumphs—make a quilt for the occasion! >


    Folded Fabric Fun:
    Easy Folded Ornaments, Pillows, Purses, Totes, and More
    by Nancy J. Martin
    $10.99 $6.00

    Folded Fabric Fun

     Amazon review: “Easy to do, the instructions are easy to follow, and most of all, they are FUN. I highly recommend this book for people who like small projects. Love it!”

    Press folds into fabric and sew, glue, or fuse to secure—it’s really that easy >


    House Party:
    Coordinated Quilts and Pillows
    by Sue Hunt
    $16.99 $6.00

    House Party

     Amazon review: “I’ve already mapped out a blank space on my living-room wall to rotate wall hangings throughout the year. Truly a great quilting book for all seasons!”

    Give the gift of dynamic decor: see more perfectly paired quilts and pillows >


    Joined at the Heart:
    Quilting for Family and Friends
    by Anne Moscicki and Linda Wyckoff-Hickey
    $19.95 $6.00

    Joined at the Heart

     Amazon review: “I like the idea of something quick and easy for a gift even though I am an advanced quilter. Can’t wait to make the pinwheel quilt—just adorable.”

    A great go-to book for fast, fun, heartwarming quilts >


    Handprint Quilts:
    Creating Children’s Keepsakes with Paint and Fabric
    by Marcia L. Layton
    $13.95 $6.00

    Handprint Quilts

     Amazon review: “Who doesn’t need a supply of cute ideas for quick gifts? The book includes projects perfect for all age groups… I love books that spark creativity.”

    Turn handprints into flowers, butterflies, dinosaurs, and more >


    Cool Girls Quilt:
    More than 15 Fresh, Fun, and Funky Projects
    by Linda Lum DeBono
    $16.95 $6.00

    Cool Girls Quilt

     Amazon review: “If you have a young person you want to teach to sew or quilt you MUST have this book. My copy is well worn and loved by both me and my daughters.”

    Stitch pretty gifts for tweens and teens—or teach them to sew! >


    The Quilter’s Home: Winter
    by Lois Krushina Fletcher
    $14.99 $6.00

    The Quilter's Home: Winter

     Amazon review: “The weather outside may be frightful, but quilting is so delightful…will give you hours of quilting delight and numerous projects to turn your home into a winter wonderland.”

    Warm up someone’s winter—whip up one of many projects in an afternoon >


    From the Heart:
    Quilts to Cherish
    Compiled by Dawn Anderson
    $14.99 $6.00

    From the Heart

    Thank a loved one, encourage a friend, or give a to someone close to you >


    Subscribe to Stitch This!P.S. Sale ends at midnight on Sunday, November 2. Don’t miss our Cyber Monday sale coming soon! SUBSCRIBE to Stitch This! emails so you’ll be first in line.


    Own one of these Martingale quilt books? Share your review in the comments!


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  6. Patterns for Breast Cancer Awareness Month

    Martingale's Knit & Crochet Friday

    Knit and crochet for Breast Cancer Awareness MonthOctober is Breast Cancer Awareness Month—an annual campaign to bring awareness about the impact of this all-too-prevalent illness. Breast Cancer has affected many of us, either directly or indirectly. Take the opportunity to offer your support in an actionable way—whether in October or after. Not sure where to start? Here are three suggestions:

    1. Knit or crochet a chemo cap pattern for a woman in need

    Whether it’s for a close friend, a family member, an acquaintance, or even a stranger, a knitted or crocheted hat for a breast cancer patient is a wonderful gesture and a much-needed gift.

    You can find the knit chemo hat pattern shown above in Knit Pink by Lorna Miser, along with 24 additional breast cancer knitting patterns from lap robes to sweaters and mittens. You’ll find a similar variety of cancer crochet patterns in Crochet Pink by Janet Rehfeldt.

    Be sure to carefully choose the best yarn for chemo caps. Here’s a tip:

    Quick tip: Choosing yarn for chemo caps
    Want to donate a chemo cap?

    The National Needle Arts Association has teamed up with Woman’s Day magazine to sponsor a chemo cap charity drive through December 31, 2014. Simply knit or crochet a chemo cap (you can use a pattern from Knit Pink or Crochet Pink, or use the free patterns on TNNA’s site) and mail to TNNA or drop off at a TNNA retailer (you can search for one near you here). Questions? Email health@tnna.org.

    2. Donate your time or money

    If you won’t be knitting a chemo cap or other gift for a cancer patient, consider giving a monetary donation to the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Your donation will help provide mammograms for women in need.

    You can also volunteer your time to help educate women or host a fundraiser for the National Breast Cancer Foundation. Find out more here.

    3. Create an early detection plan

    Early detection is one of the key factors for improving survival rates. Do you and your loved ones have an early detection plan? Do you part to create a plan here and invite your friends and relatives to do the same.

    Knit Pink Crochet Pink

    Find more patterns to knit and crochet for comfort, gratitude, and charity in Knit Pink and Crochet Pink. Any of the patterns can be adapted for different forms of cancer by simply swapping out the yarn color. Find a list of cancer awareness colors here.


    Which action will you take for Breast Cancer Awareness month? Tell us in the comments!


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  7. Quilt-value anxiety, be gone: meet the Ruby Beholder (+ special offer)

    Posted by on October 23, 2014, in quilting & sewing, , ,

    If you’ve struggled with choosing fabric values for your quilts, you’re not alone. Determining which colors are light, medium-light, medium, medium-dark, and dark sounds like a cinch. But if you’ve tried it, you know it can be tricky.

    Quilt fabrics from Becoming a Confident Quilter
    
How would you order these fabrics from light to dark? Hmm…

    Contrast is key to creating sharp, clear designs in your quilts—that’s where value comes in. Believe it or not, the best way to find contrast is to take the colors out of fabrics. Because once colors are gone, only values remain.

    There are many homegrown methods for “removing” colors from fabrics. Looking at quilts through doorway peepholes, peeking through the wrong end of binoculars, and good-old fashioned squinting are just a few. But there’s also a tool that offers an easy way to make colors go away—the Ruby Beholder.

    Ruby Beholder

    Many painters, photographers, and of course quilters swear by the Ruby Beholder to help them see values. See how the tool works in this quick video:


    Do you find value in considering value when you make your quilts? Tell us in the comments!


    You might also like:
    How to find quilt values? Trust Ruby


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  8. Amish quilting patterns, urban quilt style (+ giveaway!)

    To many quilters, Amish quilts represent the pinnacle of traditional quilt design and craftsmanship. The bold, graphic patterns sparkle in rich solid colors, and the beautifully flowing hand-quilting stitches demonstrate a high level of skill that many of us aspire to.

    As traditional as they are, the drama and simplicity of Amish quilt patterns make them seem as much at home in a city apartment as in a rural farmhouse. They can be as fresh and contemporary as any modern quilt being designed today, and in fact, some modern quilt designers acknowledge the Amish as one source of their design inspiration.

    Quilts from Urban and Amish
    “Lone Star” (top) and “Urban Ohio” (bottom) from
    Urban and Amish

    Myra Harder is a designer whose passion for Amish design is rooted in her childhood, when her family lived for a time in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. In her new book, Urban and Amish, Myra demonstrates the versatility and timelessness of Amish designs by using them as a jumping-off point for her own new designs. For each traditional Amish quilt pattern in the book, she presents a fresh update.

    Quilts from Urban and Amish
    A very traditional “Amish Bars” inspired a horizontal bar quilt, “Horizon Lines.”

    Quilts from Urban and Amish
    The classic “Trip Around the World” became “Trip to New York,” inspired by Myra’s memory of seeing buildings reflected in the Hudson River on a family trip to Manhattan.

    Quilts from Urban and Amish
    The iconic “Amish Nine Patch” is reimagined in the warm, inviting “Southern Comfort.”

    Urban and AmishMyra designed the quilts in Urban and Amish with the fabric in mind: large pieces and simple patchwork place the emphasis on the beautiful prints she chose to feature in her “urban” updates. What gorgeous prints in your stash would lend themselves to one of these patterns? Perhaps you have a stack of solids just waiting to be transformed into a stunning Amish quilt. Whether you opt for traditional or modern, or a coordinating pair (wouldn’t that be fabulous?), these quilts will bring beauty and comfort to any setting.
    spacer 10px deep


    What’s your style: Urban, Amish, or a little of both? Tell us in the comments and you could win a copy of the Urban and Amish eBook! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.


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  9. Modern, but basic: easy quilts to try (+ fabric giveaway!)

    Quilts from Modern BasicsCurious what it’s like to create a “modern” quilt? Amy Ellis will soon release her fourth book, and each one makes dipping your toe in the modern-quilting pool easy and fun. Once you stitch a quilt with Amy, you’ll want to dive in head first to start another.

    Amy’s gift? Giving classic foundations a modern twist. Because one style relies on the other, you can achieve a fresh look while preserving elements that make traditional quilts so cozy and welcoming.

    Amy’s quilts have these three traits in common:

    1. Designs typically use just one block pattern.
    2. Cutting and sewing is at its simplest (Amy has a knack for streamlining).
    3. It’s all about choosing fabrics you love.

    Speaking of fabric…


    FABRIC GIVEAWAY ALERT! Our friends at Moda have generously donated a gorgeous bundle of 28 fat quarters from Amy’s new “Modern Neutrals” fabric line to give to you! Learn how you can win it—plus your choice of one of Amy’s eBooks—at the bottom of this post.

    Moda fabric giveaway
    Moda


    Start with a dash of traditional charm, add a splash of modern fun, and you’ll see why intertwining the two styles can become so addictive. See some of Amy’s easy one-block designs below.

    Modern Maze quilt
    “Modern Maze” from Modern Basics

    Revisit Log Cabin, Postage Stamp, and Rail Fence blocks in Modern Basics >

    Stepping Stones quilt
    “Stepping Stones” from
    Modern Basics II

    Create 14 easy quilts featuring Amy’s original blocks in Modern Basics II >

    Circuit Board quilt
    “Circuit Board” from
    Modern Neutrals

    So chic, so elegant—so cool! See the amazing quilts in Modern Neutrals >

    Choose fabrics you love and a design that inspires you; then let Amy help you make a mesmerizing modern quilt!

    Modern Basics Modern Basics II Modern Neutrals

    Think Big> Coming from Amy December 2:
    Think Big: Quilts, Runners, and Pillows from 18″ Blocksspacer


    Rate your experience with modern quilting: dipped a toe, taken a swim, or own the pool? Tell us in the comments and you could win the gorgeous “Modern Neutrals” fabric bundle designed by Amy and provided by Moda, plus a digital copy of one of Amy’s books—your choice! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.


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  10. Six-buck eBooks all October! This week: bestsellers

    Posted by on October 20, 2014, in quilting & sewing, , ,

    $6 eBooks during the month of October!

    WEEK THREE: BESTSELLING eBOOKS

    Stock your computer, laptop, or tablet with Martingale quilt books—our top 10 bestselling eBooks of all time! Download eBooks instantly and start stitching minutes from now. Only $6 each with new choices every week.

     Sale on select eBooks below ends at midnight on Sunday, October 26.


    Quilting for Joy
    by Barbara Brandeburg and Teri Christopherson
    $18.95 $6.00

    Quilting for Joy

     Amazon review: “…a fine gathering of projects that express a love of quilting, blending traditional with trendy fabrics and colors.”

    Choose from 14 fun quilts to make—just for the joy of it! >


    Coffee-Time Quilts:
    Super Projects, Sweet Recipes

    by Cathy Wierzbicki
    $16.95 $6.00

    Coffee-Time Quilts

     Amazon review: “This book is one of those books that you can sit down to glance through with your favorite hot beverage and a roaring fire, feeling so relaxed…The best therapy.”

    Enjoy a dozen quilts plus yummy dessert recipes—perfect to pair with coffee >


    Quilting with My Sister:
    15 Projects to Celebrate Women’s Lives

    by Barbara Brandeburg and Teri Christopherson
    $19.99 $6.00

    Quilting with My Sister

     Amazon review: “This book inspired me to do more appliqué and to try the machine technique. The authors’ introduction about their family sewing experiences was enjoyable reading.”

    Celebrate home and family in 15 heartwarming quilts >


    Favorite Quilts from Anka’s Treasures
    by Heather Mulder Peterson
    $19.99 $6.00

    Favorite Quilts from Ankas Treasures

     Amazon review: “Heather makes difficult looking patterns very easy to make. I took this book to my quilting group and everyone loved it.”

    Update old-time classics with new twists >


    Showstopping Quilts to Foundation Piece
    by Tricia Lund and Judy Pollard
    $18.99 $6.00

    Showstopping Quilts to Foundation Piece

     Amazon review: “Step-by-step lessons on foundation piecing tell how to change color, design, and more to produce outstanding quilts, and provide fine examples for any quilter seeking superior art.”

    Awe-inspiring quilts, perfectly pieced results >


    The Best of Black Mountain Quilts
    by Teri Christopherson
    $19.99 $6.00

    The Best of Black Mountain Quilts

     Amazon review: “This is the best quilt book in my collection. I seldom am tempted to make a quilt exactly as shown…but I could happily make my way through this book one quilt at a time!”

    Create 30 seasonal quilts with simple piecing and fusible appliqué >


    Fig Tree Quilts: Houses
    by Joanna Figueroa and Lisa Quan
    $19.99 $6.00

    Fig Tree Quilts: Houses

     Amazon review: “This book has so many updated houses. I love it! If you have ever wanted to do a house quilt, this book is for you.”

    Find a quilted house that makes you feel right at home >


    Cottage-Style Quilts:
    16 Projects for Casual Country Living

    by Mary Hickey
    $19.95 $6.00

    Cottage-Style Quilts

     Amazon review: “This is such a charming book; I’ll spend many hours with it I know.”

    Cottage, farmhouse, or cabin? The choice is yours! >


    A Fresh Look at Seasonal Quilts
    by Julie Popa
    $16.95 $6.00

    A Fresh Look at Seasonal Quilts

     Amazon review: “Your biggest challenge will be—which project will you do first?”

    Capture the seasons with a dash of tradition and a splash of folk-art fun >


    Quilts from Aunt Amy
    by Mary Tendall Etherington and Connie Tesene
    $16.99 $6.00

    Quilts from Aunt Amy

    Amazon review: “Gives you lots of ways to use up your scraps…when the quilt is done it looks like it came out of your grandmother’s attic. The history is a nice read too.”

    Century-old blocks get a Country Threads makeover >


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