1. A trip to quilt country: a perfectly imperfect journey (+ flash sale!)

    Welcome to quilt country! Population: you, all your quilty friends, and of course the mayor: quilt designer extraordinaire Cheryl Wall. Famed for her cozy quilt designs, Cheryl is the author of one of our favorite country-style quilting books, Country Comforts: Quilts for Casual Living.
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    Chocolate-Covered Churn Dashes quilt
    “Chocolate-Covered Churn Dashes” from Country Comforts

    Cheryl’s quilting philosophy centers on beauty without perfection, and Country Comforts is all about enjoying the entire trip through quilt country, not just the finished-quilt-destination.

    You can download the Country Comforts eBook right now for just $6.

    Country Comforts flash-sale banner

    Wander among traditional blocks like Log Cabins and Churn Dashes, get lost in rich earth tones and scrappy fabric combinations, and use Country Comforts as your roadmap!

    These quilters have taken the journey and here’s what they had to say on Amazon.com:

    “It’s filled with quilts that every level of quilter will feel comfortable trying. Do yourself a favor, buy it!” —Joseph K. Pack

    “The book is first quality and chock full of great, interesting, appealing quilting projects.” —C. A. Bejtlich

    “The helpful hints throughout the book together with the author’s relaxed, casual approach to quiltmaking encourage creativity while providing the freedom to make mistakes that you don’t have to rip out. My kind of book!” —S. Atkins

    Let’s go sightseeing in quilt country, shall we?
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    Mountains and Meadows quilt
    Mountains and Meadows from Country Comforts
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    Prairie Stars quilt
    Prairie Stars from Country Comforts
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    Garden at the Cabin quilt
    Garden at the Cabin from Country Comforts
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    Flowers in the Snow quilt
    Flowers in the Snow from
    Country Comforts

    See all 12 country-style quilts from Country Comforts >


    Country ComfortsLike to linger in quilt country awhile longer? Be sure to download your copy of Country Comforts right now—this $6 flash sale ends Monday, Aug. 3, at noon (PST).


    What do you focus on when you’re quilting: process or finished product? Tell us in the comments!

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  2. Sew with Pat Sloan: new QAL is underway!

    Yoo-hoo! Guess who’s got some big news?

    Pat Sloan's Farmer's Market Sew-Along

    Who’s hiding behind that lovely “Farmer’s Market” quilt? Why, it’s bestselling author Pat Sloan—and she’s inviting YOU to join her for some summer quilting fun!
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    Pat Sloan's Farmer's Market Sew Along

    Ready to make this “Farmer’s Market” quilt and make some new online quilting friends in the process? Pat makes it easy to join up and share your quilt’s progress through her Facebook group. Best of all, when you buy Pat’s book Teach Me to Appliqué—which includes the “Farmer’s Market” quilt pattern—you’ll learn her easy fusible-appliqué technique as you make each block. By the time you sew your final block, you’ll be a pro!

    Sewing block #1 starts on Wednesday, August 12. Here’s how to join:

    STEP 1: Get your copy of Pat Sloan’s Teach Me to Appliqué. Purchase a copy from Pat here and she’ll autograph it for you! Or, you can pick it up at your local quilt shop or purchase a print or eBook copy at ShopMartingale.com.

    STEP 2: Once you have your book in hand (or on screen), start gathering your fabrics! Pat says, “I’d love for you to make this quilt your own using your very favorite fabrics. How about using some of your precious scraps for the appliqué, the ones you’ve saved for something special? A unique fabric for the apple or those wee scraps for the leaves?”

    STEP 3: Meet virtually on the 2nd Wednesday of each month to start the next block. The first block to make is the squash block at the top left of the quilt.
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    Squash quilt block
    Squash quilt block from Pat Sloan’s Teach Me to Appliqué

    Pat has promised a yummy recipe to go along with that block!

    See more about getting started in this blog post from Pat.

    Never done fusible appliqué? Pat Sloan’s Teach Me to Appliqué will guide you step by step. You don’t have to settle for fusible appliqué that feels stiff as a board; with this technique your appliqué will feel soft and cuddly—just like a quilt should feel.

    Pat’s spent years refining her approach, and you’ll be amazed at how quick and easy her “doughnut” method is to master. Learn all about it in Pat Sloan’s Teach Me to Appliqué.
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    Farmer's Market quilt

    Want more details about Pat’s method? Check out her blog post that shows you a peek at the process.

    We’d love to see (and share) your progress! Tag your “Farmer’s Market” quilt photos with #farmersmarketsewalong when you share them on Instagram and Pinterest.
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    Pat Sloan's Teach Me to Applique

    With this creative, enthusiastic woman at the helm, you know it’s going to be a stitchin’ good time!


    Who’s ready to “sew-along” with Pat? Tell us in the comments if you plan to join her!

    Save 20% + free shipping on select books


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  3. Knit socks two at a time for double the fun

    Knit and Crochet at Stitch This!

    I take my knitting with me whenever I can, and I’m not shy about knitting in public. Knitting can spark the most interesting conversations, don’t you think? The most bewildered looks and curious questions come when I’m knitting two-at-a-time socks on two circular needles, a technique I learned from Antje Gillingham’s book Knitting Circles around Socks. The project-in-process can appear baffling, but once you understand the logic behind the technique, it’s a breeze to learn.

    Fixation on Lace knitted socks
    “Fixation on Lace” from
    Knitting Circles around Socks

    For me, knitting with two circular needles was the key to successful sock knitting. Either dropping needles or poking myself, I was a disaster with double-pointed needles, and even with a circular needle I couldn’t seem to finish a second sock. But two at a time? It didn’t take long to convince me this was the way to go, and it’s become one of my favorite knitting techniques.

    In Antje’s second book, Knitting More Circles around Socks, she introduced her technique for two-at-a-time, toe-up socks, and I was over the moon. This is now my favorite sock-knitting method: I can try the socks on as I go and I don’t have yarn left over.

    Women's basic toe-up socks
    “Women’s Basic Toe-Up Sock” from
    Knitting More Circles around Socks
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    Mary's basic toe-up socks
    My first toe-up socks, made from
    Knitting More Circles around Socks


    TWO-AT-A-TIME TIP

    Is it a row or is it a round? According to Antje, this is the question her students struggle with most. Here, she explains the basic concept for knitting two-at-a-time on two circular needles.
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    Knitting row or round?

    “Is it a row or is it a round? Well, it’s both! Each sock is divided into two halves, with half the stitches on each needle. When you begin to knit, you’ll work two halves on one needle, which is a row. When you get to the end of the second sock on one needle, you turn your work (this is one half of the round) and knit the other two halves, once again in a row. At the end, you’ve completed two rows, which equal one complete round.”


    Makes sense, doesn’t it? That’s all there is to it.

    Want more two-at-a-time fun? Think mittens, leg warmers, and fingerless mitts.

    Knitting Circles around Socks Knitting More Circles around Socks Knitting Circles around Mittens and More

    You can even use the same two-needle concept to knit hats and anything else that’s round; I’ve even used it to make the arms and legs of stuffies for my grandchildren.

    Buy the eBook versions of any of Antje’s books and you can start learning the two-at-a-time technique just minutes from now!


    What’s your favorite sock-knitting technique? Tell us in the comments!


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  4. Happy New Year! “TPP” 2016 calendar arrives (+ giveaway!)

    Quilters, take note! Our all-new That Patchwork Place Quilt Calendar 2016 is hot off the press—and it’s the perfect partner for a year of quilting fun!

    That Patchwork Place Quilt Calendar 2016

    For 14 years this beloved calendar has graced the kitchens, offices, and sewing rooms of quilters around the world. And this year’s calendar is the best yet, featuring your favorite designers. Here are a few “calendar girls” celebrating selfie style!
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    Amber Johnson Shelley Wicks and Jeanne Large
    Left: Amber Johnson, Vintage Vibe. Right: Shelley Wicks and Jeanne Large, Here Comes Winter.

    Gretchen Gibbons Kim Diehl
    Left: Gretchen Gibbons, My Enchanted Garden. Right: Kim Diehl, Simple Appeal.

    Carol Hopkins Melissa Corry
    Left: Carol Hopkins, Civil War Legacies II. Right: Melissa Corry, Irish Chain Quilts.

    Put your passion on display year ’round as you enjoy dazzling quilts from the designers above, plus Country Threads, Vicki Bellino, and more. And as always, you’ll get 12 step-by-step patterns in a pullout booklet—make any quilt featured!
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    From That Patchwork Place Quilt Calendar 2016
    From
    That Patchwork Place Quilt Calendar 2016

    You’ll find just the right place to record the next guild meeting, quilt show, and shop hop in your new calendar. Keep track of quilt-alongs, round robins, and retreats too. And don’t forget to grab a few for your friends—the calendar makes a perfect quilter-to-quilter gift.
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    That Patchwork Place Quilt Calendar 2016
    A peek at the back cover—and all the quilts you’ll enjoy in 2016!

    A perennial favorite—see (and sew) every quilt >

    Keep track of your days and stay inspired every month! Please note that limited quantities are available, so get your copy now at your local quilt shop or at ShopMartingale.com.


    What are your quilty plans for 2016: sign up for a retreat, start (or finish!) an heirloom, hit every stop on a shop hop? Tell us in the comments and you could win a copy of That Patchwork Place Quilt Calendar 2016! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.


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  5. 4 smart tips for quilting with strips (+ sale!)

    Save 20% + free shipping on select books

    Strips strips strips!No matter what style of quilter you are or how long you’ve been quilting, chances are you’ve cut a strip or two of fabric in your quilting life. (And yes, my tongue is firmly in cheek!) Strips are the very first cut you make from your fabric—unless you buy them already precut, that is!

    Whether you’re a “Precut Princess” who buys strips or a “Scrap Queen” who cuts her own (or maybe a little of both?), the popular authors of this week’s sale books have some great tips for how to make a strip quilt—along with some fabulous patterns of course!


    Kate HendersonSTRIP TIP #1: CHOOSING A COLOR SCHEME
    From Strip Savvy by Kate Henderson

    We hear it all the time: “I’m just not good at choosing colors.” Kate says: “If you’re not sure where to start with a scrappy quilt or you’re unsure about choosing a color theme, start with a few selections from the same fabric line and then add other pieces with coordinating colors and motifs. Don’t overthink; just grab what catches your eye first.”

    Open Sesame quilt
    “Open Sesame” from Strip Savvy

    See 17 more examples of Kate’s strip-savvy designs >


    Kathy BrownSTRIP TIP #2: SUCCESSFUL CUTTING THROUGH MULTIPLE LAYERS
    From Strip-Smart Quilts by Kathy Brown

    Accurate cutting, especially if you’re cutting through multiple layers, can be challenging. Yet it’s essential to quilting success. Kathy says: “Start each project with a new rotary-cutter blade. You’ll be cutting through the seams of strip sets and will need the sharp, accurate edge a new blade provides.”

    Family Vacation quilt
    “Family Vacation” from
    Strip-Smart Quilts

    See 15 more strip-smart quilts here >


    Kim BrackettSTRIP TIP #3: BUILDING A STRIP COLLECTION
    From Scrap Quilting, Strip by Strip by Kim Brackett

    If you’re a new quilter, or if you want more variety than your stash or a Jelly Roll has to offer, collecting lots of strips can be tricky. Here are three of best-selling author Kim Brackett’s suggestions for growing your strip stash:

    • “If you buy two precut bundles, you can pick and choose your favorite strips for your current project and use the leftover strips in another project later.”
    • “Join a strip club! (It’s not what it sounds like). Your local quilt shop may offer a strip-of-the-month club. This is a great way to collect a variety of strips in styles and colors you might not find in your stash.”
    • “Plan a strip swap. Ask each group member to bring a predetermined number of strips to swap with others.”

    Bali Sea Star quilt
    “Bali Sea Star” from
    Scrap Quilting, Strip by Strip (also available as an ePattern)

    See 11 more of Kim’s fabulous strip-pieced quilts here >


    Susan Purney MarkSTRIP TIP #4: ADD EXITEMENT WITH INSERTION STRIPS
    From Accent on Angles by Susan Purney Mark

    Have you “been there, done that” with strip piecing and want something a little different? Try adding insertion strips! Susan explains: “Insertion strips are contrasting strips of fabric sewn between strip segments. The insertion strips serve two purposes. They create a visual break between the strip-set fabrics, and they add interest to the quilts by complementing or contrasting with the strip sets.”

    Autumn Joys quilt
    “Autumn Joys” from
    Accent on Angles

    See 7 more of Susan’s quilts here >


    Are you a “Precut Princess,” a “Scrap Queen,” or “Stripless in Seattle” (or whatever town you live in)? Tell us in the comments!

    Save 20% + free shipping on select books

    *Free shipping to the US and Canada only. Must sign in or register first; free shipping will apply at checkout.


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  6. Choosing colors for quilts: advice from an expert

    Choosing colors for quiltsWhen you consider all the gorgeous quilts in the world, it’s surprising to learn that many quilters say choosing colors for quilts is one of their biggest challenges. You’d never guess it from the beautiful results.

    But I understand; I’m one who readily admits to a lack of confidence when it comes to color. That’s why I’m happy to find a book that can help me learn to pull fabrics together without always having to ask for a second opinion from my nearest fellow quilter. All About Strips by Susan Guzman is that sort of book.

    From All About Strips
    From
    All About Strips

    How to create a mood boardCan a book about quilting with strips teach you about color? Why, yes it can. Susan shares quilting tips she’s learned in her years of experience as a designer—plus her expertise as the Content Director of McCall’s Quilting magazine—from how to find quilt colors that work for you to how to discover your unique style. In the section titled “A Lesson in Color,” you’ll learn about colors and mood, where to look for color inspiration, and practical pointers for coloring a design.

    But that’s just the beginning. There’s also great advice on working with pattern and scale and on combining new fabric collections with your existing stash. And then there’s that clever exercise for creating a mood board to help you define your style (right). And we haven’t even gotten to the patterns yet!

    Here are a few examples of Susan’s color principles at work:

    Flair quilt
    Susan used a Jelly Roll for “Flair.” To make it your own, choose a Jelly Roll, then choose a solid color that appears consistently throughout the Jelly Roll collection. The solid will blend with all the prints.
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    Candy Bar Lane quilt
    “Candy Bar Lane” is feminine and pretty, offering subtle blends from one fabric to the next. For a high-impact version, add contrast by choosing an equal number of light, medium, and dark fabrics.
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    Drawers quilt
    Susan found the color cues for “Drawers” in a mural on the side of a building, demonstrating that inspiration can come from anywhere!

    See all 15 colorful quilts in All About Strips >
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    All About StripsBoost your color confidence and discover your unique style! Pick up your copy of All About Strips at your local quilt shop or at ShopMartingale.com.

    Print book: $24.99 (with FREE eBook!)
    eBook only: $16.99

    How do you rate your color confidence: I don’t know where to begin, I’m okay but I might ask your opinion, or I know just what I want? Tell us in the comments!
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    50 eBooks for $8.99 each!


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  7. Stitches to savor year-round: Sue Spargo calendar is here (+ giveaway!)

    Sneak peeking. Appetite whetting. Anticipation building!

    We’ve been talking up our first collaboration with fiber artist Sue Spargo since Spring Quilt Market. Now the time to celebrate is finally here!

    Martingale is delighted to bring you an all-new calendar in an all-new, at-a-glance format: the Stitches to Savor: 2016 Wall-Art Calendar of Designs by Sue Spargo.

    Stitches to Savor 2016 Wall-Art Calendar

    Inside you’ll find captivating displays of exquisite stitchery and folk-art whimsy. As you turn the page each month, you’ll discover how that pairing is a perfect match in Sue Spargo’s world.

    Stitches to Savor 2016 Wall-Art Calendar - September

    Explore vivid textures, fabrics, and embellishments as you enjoy Sue’s jaw-dropping, hand-sewn works in rich, close-up photography. The at-a-glance calendar format is specially designed to showcase Sue’s work even more. When the calendar hangs, it measures an impressive two feet long—it actually looks like a gorgeous quilt on the wall!

    Stitches to Savor 2016 Wall-Art Calendar

    Ring in the New Year and be inspired throughout 2016 by these stunning wool-and-cotton appliquéd, embroidered, and embellished pieces—as only Sue can stitch them. And if you’re already a fan of Sue Spargo’s work, you’ll love the chance to linger over each photo as you absorb inspiration and ideas for your own stitchery.

    Get a glimpse of each month in this flip-style video: you won’t see all 12 months anywhere else.


    Viewing this in email? See the video at the Stitch This! blog or watch it on YouTube.


    The calendar is available now—but limited quantities are selling fast. Get your copy before they’re gone and do your holiday shopping now.

    What’s your favorite month of the year? Tell us in the comments and you could win a copy of the Stitches to Savor: 2016 Wall-Art Calendar of Designs by Sue Spargo. We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.


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  8. Crochet blankets for baby’s 1st year

    Knit and Crochet at Stitch This!

    From Cuddly CrochetBinkie, blanky, lovey—whatever you call it, a baby blanket is a little one’s best friend!

    Even if you missed the shower or want to make a crochet blanket for your own tot, there are plenty of reasons to crochet a blanky during the first year (and beyond) of a child’s life. Check out these crochet baby blanket patterns for all of baby’s needs.
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    For baby’s trip home from the hospital:       

    From Blankets, Hats, and Booties
    Find this precious crocheted baby set and more in Blankets, Hats, and Booties
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    For commemorating baby’s baptism:

    From Sweet Baby Crochet
    Find this heirloom baby blanket and more special crocheted gifts in Sweet Baby Crochet
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    For baby’s nursery theme:

    From Boho Crochet
    Find this bright baby blanket and more quick and easy crochet projects in Boho Crochet
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    For baby’s bathtime:

    From Cuddly Crochet
    Find this baby hoodie towel and more sweet crocheted baby projects in Cuddly Crochet
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    For baby’s nap time:

    From Cuddly Crochet
    Find this baby blanket pattern and more adorable baby designs in Cuddly Crochet
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    For baby’s play dates:

    From Modern Baby Crochet
    Find this crochet baby blanket and more crocheted nursery patterns in Modern Baby Crochet
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    For baby’s stay at grandma and grandpa’s house:

    From Amigurumi at Home
    Find these toddler blankets and more cute crochet baby patterns in Amigurumi at Home
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    Which is it: blanky, binkie, lovey, or something else? Tell us in the comments!

    50 eBooks for $8.99 each!

     


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  9. Punch up that project with easy, creative appliqué (+ giveaway!)

    Raise your hand if you’ve finished a project, stood back to admire it, and realized that it turned out…okay.

    Not extraordinary, but ordinary. Not unusual, just the usual. Not impressive—more like hum-drum.

    Probably not your intention, right? Sigh.

    It’s happened to just about everyone who’s experimented with needle and thread.

    But what if there was a way to take any project from so-so to oh-so-special—even those disappointing, hum-drum items?

    Amy Struckmeyer is here to tell you it’s possible. And better yet, it’s easy. All you need is a bit of appliqué!

    From A Bit of Applique
    Different techniques, distinctive results: project details from
    A Bit of Appliqué

    In Amy’s new book A Bit of Appliqué, you can play with, test drive, and try out a variety of hand and machine techniques—from raw-edge to reverse appliqué—as you create small, practical projects with a modern aesthetic. Once you’ve got the hang of the methods, you can use them to elevate most any everyday item.

    Today Amy is our guest writer, here to tell you more about her “just-a-bit” approach to appliqué. Welcome, Amy!


    Amy StruckmeyerHi there, Stitch This! readers! I’m Amy, author of A Bit of Appliqué: Easy Projects with Modern Flair, and I’m so happy to be visiting here today.

    Appliqué is an enjoyable way to embellish sewing projects, making them distinctly one of a kind. I wrote A Bit of Appliqué to share ideas for modern, colorful, and whimsical everyday items, each featuring just “a bit” of one or more appliqué techniques.

    If you take on small projects and do a little at a time, it’s not difficult. I promise! The designs in the book aren’t complex. In fact, I find that simple, graphic drawings and images (children’s drawings and folk art, among them) translate quite well into amazing appliqué designs. Start with easier techniques, like raw-edge fusible appliqué, then move on to others, such as turned-edge, reverse, and bias-tape appliqué. If you’ve ever wanted to try appliqué but thought it might be too difficult, A Bit of Appliqué offers low-anxiety projects to get you started!

    For an easy first project, try the “Prairie Blooms Throw Pillow.” Simply lay out the no-fray wool felt “flowers,” topstitch the long, curvy stems, and then attach the felt shapes with a simple straight machine stitch.

    Prairie Blooms Throw Pillow
    “Prairie Blooms Throw Pillow”

    Or take raw-edge appliqué a step further with the “No. 2 Pencil Pouch,” which uses quilting cotton for the appliqué design. This is such an easy gift to make. And please don’t let the zipper intimidate you—you’ll find the instructions for inserting the zipper to be clear and well-illustrated.

    No. 2 Pencil Pouch
    “No. 2 Pencil Pouch”

    Here’s a quick tip from the book for that pesky fusible web that can be tricky to unpeel:

    Quick tip for fusible web
    Pin-It
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    Want to try turned-edge appliqué? The “Spot-On Coasters” use a simple method. Just gather the edges of a patchwork circle around a cardstock template to create a turned edge. After pressing, remove the template, and voila!, you have a finished shape to apply by hand or machine.

    Spot-On Coasters
    “Spot-On Coasters”

    A Bit of Appliqué also touches on other ways to embellish, such as adding hand embroidery, top stitching, and using handmade (or store-bought) bias tape and trim. One of my favorite projects is the “Garden Skirt” for girls, which features both bias tape and raw-edge appliqué. Not only is it embellished with embroidered details, but you also use embroidery floss to hand stitch the flower and leaf shapes in place, giving the design a delightfully whimsical look.

    Garden Skirt
    A drawing by Amy’s daughter inspired “Garden Skirt.”

    See a dozen more projects from A Bit of Appliqué >

    From bags and accessories to wearables and quilts, I hope each project in A Bit of Appliqué will inspire you to try these simple yet striking embellishment methods. Use the templates provided and try the techniques, then take it further and create your own one-of-a-kind appliqué designs.

    Thanks so much for having me here! I’d love for you to visit me on my blog. I’m also on Instagram and Pinterest.


    A Bit of AppliqueThanks for sharing your new book with us, Amy!

    What’s your favorite way to appliqué: hand or machine, turned-edge or raw-edge, fusible or felt? Tell us your preference in the comments and you could win a copy of the A Bit of Appliqué eBook! We’ll choose a random winner one week from today and let you know by email if you win.

    Can’t wait? Buy A Bit of Appliqué now and instantly download the eBook for free.


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  10. How to make a quilt pattern from a photo, step by step (video)

    50 eBooks for $8.99 each!


    Do you ever get that not-so-inspired feeling when you sit down to plan your next quilt? You’re not alone! Sometimes we all get a case of the design blahs. But learning how another quilter gets her inspiration can be a fantastic way to jolt yourself out of your stitching rut.

    Case in point: take a look at this photo.

    Photo inspiration for Lawn quilt
    Photo by Heather Scrimsher

    Do you see the makings of a quilt?

    Heather Scrimsher, author of Graphic Quilts from Everyday Images: 15 Patterns Inspired by Urban Life, Architecture, and Beyond, certainly did. She used this photo—with its strong vertical elements and the contrast between the dark tree bark and the bright green grass—to create “Lawn.”

    Lawn quilt
    “Lawn” from Graphic Quilts from Everyday Images

    Heather’s quilt-design technique is appealingly straightforward: she looks at photos of everyday objects, simplifies the messy details into just four basic shapes (squares, rectangles, circles, and triangles), and then starts stitching.

    Watch as Heather explains her design process, transforming this photo of tangled, thorny branches…

    Photo inspiration for Thorny quilt
    Photo by Heather Scrimsher

    Into a clean-lined, modern quilt.
    Thorny quilt
    “Thorny” from Graphic Quilts from Everyday Images
    spacer 10px deep


    Reading this in email? See the “Design your own quilt: from inspiration to design” video at the Stitch This! blog or watch it on YouTube.


    Now it’s your turn! You choose: make one of Heather’s photogenic quilts—she’s done all the work for you—or dig into your stash of photos for inspiration. Everything is fair game—from your vacation snapshots to family photos to pet portraits—and don’t be afraid to take some shots of the everyday objects that surround you. As Heather notes in Graphic Quilts from Everyday Images, “Sometimes even the mundane can become extraordinary when enlarged or colored in a different way.”

    Do you want your photo-inspired quilt to capture a single detail of the photo, or the entire scene?

    Masonry quilt
    Photo of an historic building by Heather Scrimsher and “Masonry” quilt from
    Graphic Quilts from Everyday Images

    Will your design be abstract or faithful to the photo?

    Falling Leaves quilt
    Photo of leaves by Heather Scrimsher and “Fall Leaves” from
    Graphic Quilts from Everyday Images

    Playfully colorful or dominated by calm neutrals?

    Interlinked quilt
    Photo of a chain link fence by Heather Scrimsher and “Interlinked” from
    Graphic Quilts from Everyday Images

    Inspiration is everywhere—you just have to “picture” it!

    Here’s a photo to get you started, taken a few miles up the road from Martingale headquarters.

    Katherine's photo
    Photo by Katherine Evans

    Share a photo you find personally inspiring with us on Facebook or Instagram, or tell us about it in the comments!

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